Arctic and North

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 22212698 / 22212698
Total articles ≅ 374

Latest articles in this journal

Anatoliy M. Vasilyev, Luzin Institute for Economic Studies — Subdivision of the Federal Research Centre “Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences”, Evgeniya A. Lisunova
Abstract:
The data on the growth of prices for Arctic fish species in 2015, 2018, compared to 2013, the period of the relatively “hard” ruble, are presented. The reasons for the price increase are shown. An important one is the replacement of the “historical” method of providing biological resources to fishermen with the “auction” one, since it is associated with payment for the right to harvest. This leads to an increase in production costs and prices for fish products, as well as to a decrease in fish consumption by the popula-tion. Objectives of the article: to develop proposals to increase the supply of products from Arctic fish to Russian markets (primarily to the markets of the North-West of the country) and to reduce their prices. The relevance of the article is due to the lack of practical measures to reduce the prices of Arctic fish products and increase consumption. The most important results: the author's proposals to stimulate increased sales of fish products in Russia provided by the fish products of the Northern basin are substantiated. Practical significance: it is shown that the use of the developed proposals will reduce consumer prices for fish products, an increase in visits of fishing vessels to Arctic ports and unloading of fish products will lead to a multiplier effect by improving the activities of fish processing enterprises and servicing the fishing fleet.
, , Valeriya A. Ushakova, Kola Science Centre of the Russian Acade-my of Sciences", Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov
Abstract:
The article analyzes the possibilities for prospecting, evaluation, exploration and extraction of zinc and lead deposits in the Arctic. The reserves and resources of zinc and lead deposits and ore occurrences on the Novaya Zemlya archipelago, on Vaygach Island, in the Polar Urals and in the Northern Timan are cal-culated on the territory of the Russian Arctic. The predominant reserves are represented by the Pavlovskoye deposit, which is being prepared for development by JSC First Mining Company of the Rosatom State Corporation. In 2019, the design of a mining enterprise was initiated, no lead and zinc mining has been carried out within the Arctic zone. A promising object is the Saureyskoye deposit in the Polar Urals. The problem is the remoteness of the site from transport highways. It is necessary to plan the construction of a dirt road from the deposit to the railway. Cargo can then be sent to the ports of the Gulf of Ob or to the port of Indiga when it is put into operation. Lead and zinc deposits on the island of Vaygach and on the Arctic coast near Amderma were previously developed. It is necessary to reassess their reserves and to determine possible development options. The extracted ore will be transported through the port of Amderma. In the Northern Timan, reassessment of non-ferrous metal ores should be carried out in a complex (lead, zinc, molybdenum, copper, nickel). Ore mining may be appropriate in connection with the construction of the deep-water seaport of Indiga. The purpose of this article is to study the mining, geological and economic characteristics of lead-zinc ore deposits and the spatial organization of marine communications for the development of the mineral resource complex of the Arctic zone of Russia. Mining facilities in the Arctic have an important strategic importance for strengthening national security of the country.
, Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov
Abstract:
The purpose of the review is to study the essence of the concept “Russian North” in the available written sources and in various branches of scientific knowledge. The historical process of the article is localized in a vast space from the Velikiy Novgorod, the Novgorod Veche Republic to Karelia, the coasts of the White and Barents Seas — the Arkhangelsk and Kola North, the NorthEast (Komi). The Russian North is un-derstood as a hybrid concept that requires interpretation of economics, politics, society, culture, archeology, history, geography, ethnology, ethnography, philosophy, philology and other branches of scientific knowledge. The conceptual content is associated with modern understanding of historical evolution from the past to the present as a result of the thesaurus of knowledge accumulated over centuries.
Andrey G. Tutygin, Lyudmila A. Chizhova,
Abstract:
The article considers the state of industrial policy in the subjects of the Arctic zone of the Russian Federation both in terms of the status and dynamics of the regional consumer market and the mechanisms of state regulation and support. In the current situation of economic sanctions and external threats, the main problems of the consumer market are the following: rising prices, transformation of transport and logistics schemes, declining quality of goods and services, reduction of their assortment. Opportunities for solving them could include: location of production sites closer to the end consumer, inter-production and interregional cooperation and specialization, state regulation and compensation of fuel, energy and transport tariffs, infrastructure development. The article considers a number of generalized cases of consumer preferences formation depending on the goods belonging of local producers to this or that sector of the “Price x Quality” matrix. A number of systemic problems associated with the need for local producers to respond to the transformational changes to which the regional consumer market is exposed today has been identified. In order to create a set of support measures and effective tools, it is necessary to develop a system of long–term guidelines and strategizing in the field of regional industrial policy: on the one hand, it is integrated into the state vertical of industrial management, on the other hand, it takes into account territorial features, industrial potential and consumer expectations of the population in the regions. Based on the analysis, the authors propose to create a single document in each region of the Russian Federation with the working title “Fundamentals of regional industrial policy and consumer market development”.
Abstract:
The article examines the problem of intergenerational dynamics of the religiosity level in post-Soviet Russia in the context of cultural transformations, combining the movement towards postsecularity and the domination of secular values of late modern societies. The paper analyzes the all-Russian data, ob-tained within the framework of the project “World Values Survey”, as well as data on religiosity and value orientations of the population of some Russian Arctic regions, obtained with the direct participation of the author. As a result of the analysis, the author verifies several hypotheses and comes to certain qualitative results. Firstly, there is a generational shift from traditional values to secular-rational values in modern Russia (according to R. Inglehart). The beginning of this process falls on the period of the socialization of the Millennial generation, the context of which is the economic and political reforms of the 19902000s. Secondly, the process of the intergenerational transformation of values is organically associated with a decline in the level of religiosity, but it is “delayed” by one generation. The author offers an explanation for this desynchronisation. Thirdly, it is shown that the religiosity level of the population of the Arctic territories is lower (in general and by generations) in comparison with the all-Russian religiosity level. The factors contributing to these differences, according to the author, are the relatively low share of Muslim population in the Russian Arctic and its high level of urbanization.
, Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov
Abstract:
The author traces the evolution of military presence in the Arctic by Russia and NATO in the article. He analyses the impact of military posturing on Arctic geopolitics. The author advocates that while military capabilities are essential for deterrence, unnecessary military rhetoric by NATO and Russia is detrimental to peace and security in the Arctic. Arctic geopolitics is fraught with tensions due to regular highly publicized military exercises and posturing in the area. The new Arctic Cold War is likely to affect Russia more adversely due to Western sanctions post-2014 and the requirement to develop the NSR as an inter-nationally competitive transport corridor. Russia has a legitimate right to protect its security in the Arctic. However, the author argues it is unnecessary to highlight such events regularly, and it may be more useful to focus on the economy and rationalize military spending. Russia needs to focus on its relationship with the Nordic countries and reemphasize its peaceful and cooperative engagement in the Arctic. Its leadership of the Arctic Council is crucial to reducing tensions in the Arctic.
Abstract:
The paper describes the history of discovery and study of karst formations of the European North of Russia. More than 100 karst formations have been identified. The main periods in the history of exploration of caves and grottoes of the Pechora Urals are reflected. The first caves descriptions which were made by travellers and scientists in the 18th19th centuries are given. During that period the most famous caves were Uninskaya and Kaninskaya caves. The main karst formations were discovered and described at the beginning of the 20th century. Geologist V.N. Mamontov discovered 4 caves on the Pervokamennaya River. Systematic geological studies by V.A. Varsanofyeva in the Northern Urals allowed her to discover small karst formations in the upper reaches of the Pechora on the Ilych and Unya rivers. In 1960, B.I. Guslitzer discovered the largest cave in the Northern Urals — the Medvezhya Cave. Promising and little-studied areas of karst are the Bolshezemelskaya Tundra, the Polar and Nether-Polar Urals, Pai-Hoi and Timan. Only a few small caves and grottoes are known on these territories. Most of the karst is located in specially protected areas. The caves are unique paleontological monuments of nature. The funds of the A.A. Chernov Geological Museum of the Institute of Geology contain 12 monographic collections of paleofaunistic material with a volume of more than 30 thousand storage units. The remains of vertebrate caves consist of bones of mammoth fauna and small mammals.
Abstract:
The article summarizes the results of the 25th St. Petersburg International Economic Forum (SPIEF-2022), which was held in St. Petersburg from June 15 to 18, 2022. As a participant of the forum, the author focuses on the analysis of Arctic issues, which were considered at the last event. They include current problems in the Arctic Council's activities, issues of the development of the Northern Sea Route, ship-building and ship repair in the Arctic, ensuring security in the region by the forces and means of the Russian EMERCOM, the state and prospects of building the international Arctic station Snezhinka, and problems of education and personnel training. Particular attention is paid to increasing the role of science, scientific and educational centers in making strategic decisions on the development of the economy, social and spiritual spheres of the Arctic territories. It is noted that, for the first time, heads of Arctic regions of the Russian Federation successfully presented investment projects in their regions at the Forum.
, Institute of Regional Consulting, , Lomonosov Moscow State University, National Research University Higher School of Economics
Abstract:
The aim (research question) of the paper is to theoretically comprehend and empirically generalize the phenomenon of governance of Russia's Arctic cities in the context of their resilience (resistance to shocks and crises). The main tasks to be solved are: 1) searching for specific indicators to characterize the administrative and managerial system of a sample of Arctic cities; 2) distinguishing the types (groups) of Arctic cities according to the selected indicators of administrative and management system; 3) characterizing the local government structure of the three Arctic cities in the context of the previously conducted typology of Arctic cities according to the parameters of administrative and management system. The main results of the work: 1) determination of the range of indicators (six) for assessing the quality of management of the 29 largest Arctic cities in terms of strengthening their resilience: these are indicators of openness to the outside world (“basicness” of the city); governance efficiency, degree of independence of decisions of city authorities; 2) identification of five clusters of cities with similar properties of the administrative and managerial subsystem: compact high-quality management, “low-cost” municipal management, “strong average” cities, significant reserves for improving management efficiency, case-anomaly; 3) institutional and geographic factors, acting together, determine the appearance of the administrative and managerial subsystem of the Arctic city. Among geographical factors, it is not latitude but longitude that is the location of the city in the European or Asian Arctic that is of primary importance; 4) For Arctic cities, where frequent natural and social force majeure demands a super-operational response to external threats, the model of power with a strong mayor is in most cases preferable to the “consensus” model of collective leadership with a weak mayor; 5) the ideal administrative and management system of the city, which implements the imperatives of basicness/openness, efficiency and autonomy to the maximum extent, and guarantees the city resilience, should have nature-like properties of self-organization, plasticity, flexibility, mobility and diversity. Their strengthening is provided by rejection of unification, including the ultimate consideration of specific features of a particular type and exploitation phase of the main natural asset nearest to the city.
, Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov,
Abstract:
India released its Arctic Policy in March 2022, a long awaited document by one of the four Observer countries to the Arctic Council indicating India's realisation of the significance of the Arctic. This article examines the evolution of India's Arctic engagement through a historical analysis of India's Arctic dis-course. Apart from enunciating the scientific and political endeavours to date, the article traces the historical evolution of India's Arctic dialogue by political, strategic and academic experts and the process of India's engagement in the region. The objective of the article is to trace the historical context of India's Arctic policy. The article's analysis of India's recently published Arctic policy suggests that India's cooperation with Arctic council countries needs to be expanded, and it also must build up on its Arctic expertise by forging links with scientific institutions and universities across the Arctic. The practical significance of the article is in its use by policy makers and researchers interested in cooperation with India in the Arctic and for academic use at universities.
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