International Public Management Journal

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 10967494 / 15593169
Published by: Informa UK Limited
Total articles ≅ 676

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 19 January 2023
International Public Management Journal pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2155739

Abstract:
As society faces more crises, it is critical for leaders, especially at the local level, to make decisions and intervene before reaching the tipping point. This often requires collective sensemaking across boundaries, but most studies focus on the challenges. This article asks how decision makers make timely decisions. It presents an institutions-process framework and analyzes the process and mechanism in the case of the response of E-Zhong City—just over an hour’s drive from Wuhan City in Hubei Province—to COVID-19 in the “Golden Seven Days” of 2020. Decision makers achieved timely decisions by exploiting all possible political opportunities and institutional tools, maximizing the diversity of the information available, and using multiple discourses and frameworks to enhance personal crisis awareness and achieve collective sensemaking across boundaries. This article defines the mechanism as bricolage and defines these decision makers as institution-knowledge bricoleurs. The concept of institution-knowledge bricoleurs extends the study of crisis decision making and the relationship between institutions and sensemaking.
Published: 5 January 2023
International Public Management Journal pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2157917

Abstract:
Empirical research has identified a long list of antecedents that promote innovation in local government organizations. However, less is known about how and why diverse antecedents—as well as their interplay—stimulate local government organizations to innovate and create public value. We address this gap through a systematic and critical interpretive synthesis of the empirical literature on innovation and entrepreneurship in local government organizations. Our review advances theory development about public sector innovation processes by (1) showing how antecedents relate to each other across levels of analysis in a process model and (2) explicating why local government organizations generate/adopt innovation through innovation capability. Our emerging theory offers several contributions to the public sector innovation literature and a forward-looking research agenda.
, Rebecca Risbjerg Nørgaard, , Mathilde Andreassen Winsløw, Mathias Rask Østergaard-Nielsen
Published: 3 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-34; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2109787

Abstract:
What is the difference between public and private management? This contested question has implications for why and how to study public management and for how to manage public organizations. Therefore, we conduct the first systematic review of the empirical literature of perceptual and behavioral differences between public and private managers since Boyne (2002a). We review 41 studies related to five theoretical expectations: Public managers experience a more complex stakeholder environment, stricter accountability demands, more ambiguous goals, less autonomy, and different values than their private sector counterparts do. The findings from the reviewed studies provide evidence of differences related to all five themes. However, as a field, we need a more refined understanding and operationalization of what it means to be a public versus a private organization. Additionally, we argue it is time to move beyond the dichotomous difference/no-difference discussion and focus on substantive, contextual factors and behavioral effects.
Published: 3 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2138660

Abstract:
When facing a disobedient client, caseworkers are often required to impose sanctions. Even when sanctions are explicitly required by law, however, research shows that caseworkers may turn a blind eye. Why so? This study asks how certain clients can merit themselves to avoid sanctioning. Theorizing from the notion of client deservingness, we develop a theoretical account of how certain client attributes cause frontline workers to bend the rules. Drawing from a novel conjoint experiment among Danish unemployment caseworkers (n = 407 with 1,210 observations), we show how caseworkers tend to favor stronger clients when bending the rules in clients’ favor. Clients who appear motivated, who have not been sanctioned in the past, and who have more past job experience are all less likely to be sanctioned. Our findings reveal a paradox: Although welfare usually targets clients in need, avoiding welfare sanctions seems based on client resources. Consequently, caseworker rule-bending can have unintended distributional consequences since stronger clients are those who can get away with disobedience.
Published: 3 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-22; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2126043

Abstract:
Collaborative innovation has received substantial scholarly attention, but we still know little about its underlying mechanisms. Using qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), this study examines how four conditions, namely, network initiation by key stakeholders, high network diversity, extensive network prehistory, and highly engaged network process, combine with one another to lead to a high/low level of collaborative innovation. Our study contributes to the governance and policy literature through uncovering the mechanisms for collaborative innovation. Specifically, it has identified three generic mechanisms that lead to a high level of collaborative innovation: the urgency-based mechanism, the interdependence-based mechanism, and the trust-based mechanism.
, Julia Thaler
Published: 3 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-31; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2125603

Abstract:
Scholars and practitioners agree that networking is a necessity in managers’ daily work, particularly in the domain of public and nonprofit management, in which service provision through networks has become the rule rather than the exception. However, the plethora of studies published on this topic has resulted in a highly fragmented body of literature. Such fragmentation calls for a systematic review that consolidates extant insights. This review structures findings from 63 studies on managerial networking published in leading public and nonprofit management journals and thereby provides an overview of constructs and measures used in networking research, as well as an integrated framework of the antecedents and consequences of managerial networking. A proposed research agenda calls, among other things, for the use of more sophisticated networking measures, a focus on the psychological antecedents of networking, as well as examinations of the dark side of networking and replication studies.
, Eva Sørensen, Janne Paulsen Breimo
Published: 3 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2128127

Abstract:
Transformations of public governance, organization, and leadership are often propelled by the import, diffusion, and onboarding of new magic concepts promising to cure existing problems and to pave the way for a golden future. This article shows how the magic concept of “co-creation” entered the public sector in Norway, was spread across public organizations at different levels, and finally was given concrete meaning in local public service organizations. Based on a tailor-made theoretical framework and a mixed-methods, multi-level study, it presents empirical findings that shed light on how a national public sector is swept by new governance ideas. The discussion reflects on the impact of the swift introduction of co-creation in a Norwegian context. It ponders the risk that the new ideas and practices might clash with existing modes of governance and insists on the need to cope with emerging dilemmas and paradoxes. The conclusion summarizes the argument and calls for further research investigating the role of magic concepts as drivers of change in public administration.
Published: 1 November 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-21; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2123874

Abstract:
The study of representative bureaucracy traces out multiple organizational and individual-level pathways through which identity-based representation contributes to improvements in bureaucratic processes, outcomes, and legitimacy. Leveraging a multi-level dataset of Florida emergency room visits, we simultaneously model aggregate (indirect) and individual (direct) forms of representation to shed light on what we term “contagion effects” in representative bureaucracy. Our theory of contagion argues that the presence of under-represented bureaucrats (in the aggregate) can change the behavior of other existing bureaucrats. An empirical test of physician-patient sex matching in heart attack outcomes finds that male physicians get better results for female patients when they work alongside more female physicians in their unit, that contagion effects are indicative of men changing their behavior to be more receptive to women’s symptoms, and that the quality of medical school is related to men’s susceptibility to contagion influences.
, Ellen V. Rubin
Published: 3 October 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2124336

Abstract:
Over five decades, US civil service laws institutionalized federal employees’ whistleblower rights through a series of reforms since 1978. In 2012, the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act extended statutory protections to employees of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) for the first time. This quasi-experimental study evaluates whether these legal protections changed the perceptions of TSA employees by enhancing their behavioral control over the opportunity to blow the whistle. Changes in TSA employee perceptions of behavioral control are compared to changes in perceptions in three control agencies, using a difference-in-differences estimation. We further consider whether TSA managers’ perceptions change in unique ways, in comparison to the control agencies. The results indicate that providing protection only changed TSA employees’ behavioral control over whistleblowing immediately after passage, but not over the long term. Further, the law did enhance TSA managers’ perceived behavioral control differentially. Policy implications for reconstructing the shield is provided.
, Can Chen, Yu Shi
Published: 27 September 2022
International Public Management Journal pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2022.2120938

Abstract:
The COVID-19 global pandemic has prompted a variety of fiscal policy responses from national governments around the world. This research constructs a panel data set of 170 countries to investigate the impact of fiscal capacity and COVID-19 crisis severity on government spending during the pandemic, after controlling for socio-economic, political, and institutional factors. Using cluster analysis and multivariate regression, the results show that COVID-19 fiscal spending increased with the expansion of the pandemic, although spending on COVID-19 tended to decrease somewhat over time. We also find that countries with stronger fiscal capacity were associated with higher fiscal spending during the pandemic. Thus, our study suggests that the severity of the pandemic combined with the fiscal capacity of countries shaped government spending on COVID-19.
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