South African Journal of Physiotherapy

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 03796175 / 24108219
Published by: AOSIS Open Journals
Total articles ≅ 1,511

Latest articles in this journal

Sahreen Anwar, Syed A. Arsalan, Hamayun Zafar, Ashfaq Ahmed, Syed A. Gillani, Asif Hanif
Published: 21 December 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1793

Abstract:
The South African Journal of Physiotherapy is the official scholarly refereed journal of the South African Society of Physiotherapy. It aims to publish original research and facilitate continuing professional development for physiotherapists and other health professions both nationally and internationally.
Natalie Benjamin-Damons, Naeema A.R. Hussein El Kout, Rogier Van Bever Donker, Tamsen Edwards, Gillian Ferguson
Published: 12 December 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1794

Abstract:
Background: The global estimate of shoulder pain is 67% and is often associated with subacromial impingement syndrome. Interventions include corticosteroid injection (CSI) therapy and physiotherapy. Further information is needed to compare the effect of these interventions on pain, joint range of motion (ROM) and shoulder function. Objectives: To summarise the best evidence comparing the effect of CSI versus physiotherapy on pain, shoulder ROM and shoulder function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Method: This evidence statement is based on a systematic review and meta-analysis of three randomised controlled trials (RCTs), namely, Rhon et al. (2014) (n = 136), Hay et al. (2003) (n = 207) and Van der Windt et al. (1998) (n = 109), with a total of 452 participants. A total of 14 studies were reviewed and only 3 studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: An improvement in shoulder function was found in favour of CSI at 6- to 7-week follow-up (p < 0.0001), but no evidence was found for the superiority of CSI compared to physiotherapy for pain and ROM over 4–12 weeks. In 24 and 48 weeks, no evidence was found for the superiority of CSI compared to physiotherapy for shoulder function, pain or ROM. Conclusion: No evidence was found for the superiority of CSI compared to physiotherapy for pain and ROM in the short term besides an improvement in shoulder function in favour of CSI at 6–7 weeks. There was a weak recommendation with moderate quality of evidence based on three RCTs (2B). Clinical implications: This evidence statement may inform clinical practice when determining which intervention is best suited to manage patients with shoulder pain.
Aimee V. Stewart
Published: 12 December 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1828

Abstract:
The South African Journal of Physiotherapy is the official scholarly refereed journal of the South African Society of Physiotherapy. It aims to publish original research and facilitate continuing professional development for physiotherapists and other health professions both nationally and internationally.
Hassan Beddaa, Bouchra Kably, Basma Marzouk, Ikrame Mouhi, Abdelghafour Marfak, Youness Azemmour, Ismail Bouzekraoui Alaoui, Nazha Birouk
Published: 30 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1823

Abstract:
Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most prevalent upper limb compression neuropathy. Surgical or nonsurgical treatment is recommended. Both mild and moderate CTS can be managed conservatively. Neurodynamic mobilisation techniques (NMTs) of the median nerve have not been widely studied, and conflicting findings exist. Methods/design: Sixty-two female patients with mild or moderate bilateral CTS were assigned one wrist to the treatment group (TG) and the other to the control group (CG). Both groups underwent carpal bone mobilisation. The TG underwent NMTs while the CG received a placebo elbow mobilisation not targeting the median nerve. The Numerical Rating Pain Scale, JAMAR Plus Digital Hand dynamometer and Functional Status Scale (FSS) were used to assess pain, grip strength and functional status. Discussion: Comparison of groups showed that NMTs at 5 weeks decreased pain intensity by 1.15 (p = 0.001) and by 2 (p ˂ 0.001) at 10 weeks. Difference in functional status was 0.45 at 5 weeks (p = 0.003) and 0.84 at 10 weeks (p = 0.003). The CG’s grip strength improved by 0.59 (p = 0.05) after 5 weeks and 0.61 (p = 0.028) at 10 weeks. Both groups improved in all parameters over time. Conclusion: When combined with carpal bone mobilisation, both NMTs and placebo elbow mobilisation seem to reduce pain intensity and improve grip strength and functional status. However, NMTs had better results in pain intensity and FSS. Clinical implications: Women with mild or moderate bilateral CTS may benefit from NMTs as a conservative treatment option. Trial registration: Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, PACTR202201807752672, https://pactr.samrc.ac.za/TrialDisplay.aspx?TrialID=19340.
Cassandra V. Rego, JoAnne L. Potterton
Published: 30 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1812

Abstract:
Background: Gross motor delays are common in infants and preschool children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These delays persist in children of school-going age and may affect participation in classroom and playground activities; however, the extent of the problem is poorly understood in this age group. Objectives: Our study aimed to determine the motor function, muscle strength and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children aged 5–10 years who were perinatally infected with HIV. Methods: In our cross-sectional study, participants were recruited using convenience sampling from a Gauteng HIV clinic. Participants were assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (MABC-2), standing broad jump test (SBJT), Paediatric Quality of Life InventoryTM (PedsQL) and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results: Thirty children participated in our study. The MABC-2 showed 60% of the children assessed were either at risk of developmental delay or were already delayed, with the domain of manual dexterity being most affected. The SBJT showed female participants had weaker muscle strength than males. The mean total score on the PedsQL was 81%, with the subscales ranging from very high quality of life scores to moderately high quality of life scores, with emotional functioning having one of the lower overall scores. Conclusion: Children who have been perinatally infected with HIV are at significant risk of delayed motor function. Muscle strength is also an area of concern, as is emotional HRQoL. Further research and implementation of holistic rehabilitation programmes are needed. Clinical implications: Children with HIV need to be prioritised for developmental screening throughout childhood. Health promotion and early intervention need to be at the forefront of our fight against this pandemic.
Jibril M. Nuhu, Roline Barnes, Anke van der Merwe
Published: 29 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1819

Abstract:
Background: Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Exercise is crucial for ameliorating the burden associated with cancer and its management. A broad review of exercise interventions for cancer patients is not available. Objective: Our study aims to review the documented exercise interventions prescribed for adult cancer patients aimed at ameliorating cancer-related and cancer treatment-induced symptoms in patients along the continuum of care. Methods: A three-step search strategy will be used, the research question was developed; the first step in the research process was identified and the search strategy was developed using the Participants-Concept-Context framework. English language publications from 15 electronic databases from 2011 to 2021 will be searched. The Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for scoping reviews will be to guide the review and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for scoping reviews will be used for the report. The search strategy incorporated terms relevant to the research question. The reference lists of articles included in the review will be screened for additional papers. Searched articles will be screened to determine their eligibility for inclusion and a pretested data extraction form will be used to chart the extracted evidence. Results: This article presents a protocol for a scoping review on exercise interventions to affect symptoms in cancer patients from diagnosis to end-of-life care. Conclusion: A broad review of exercise interventions for cancer management in adult patients will elucidate the characteristics and context of exercises used along the cancer care continuum. Clinical implications: Exercise interventions used as part of cancer management will be mapped out to provide an overview of such exercise interventions. This could enhance knowledge among exercise oncology experts regarding exercise interventions for different cancer patient populations.
Abdulsalam M. Yakasai, Gordana Dermody, Sonill S. Maharaj, Auwal B. Hassan, Auwal Abdullahi, Jibrin S. Usman, Musa S. Danazumi
Published: 22 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1795

Abstract:
Background: Mental health in medical students is well researched, with physiotherapy students receiving less attention even though psychiatry is a recognised specialty within physiotherapy. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and correlates of depression, anxiety and stress among physiotherapy clinical students. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed on 402 physiotherapy clinical students aged 17–40 years using a convenience sampling method. The data were collected using the self-administered 42-items Depression, Anxiety and Stress scale (DASS) and the data were analysed using a Chi-square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among these students was 79.9%, 85.6% and 81.6%, respectively. The results indicate that financial status and social life influenced depression by 20.6% (odds ratio [OR] [95%] = 1.206 [1.110, 1.311]) and 36% (OR [95%] = 1.360 [1.050, 1.764]), respectively. Fear of repeating a class influenced anxiety by eight times (OR [95%] = 8.330 [6.643, 10.422]). Fear of repeating a class, financial status and academic performance influenced stress by eight times (OR [95%] = 8.360 [6.677, 10.470]), 17.5% (OR [95%] = 1.175 [1.083, 1.275]) and 18.1% (OR [95%] = 1.181 [1.083, 1.276]), respectively. Conclusion: Our study concluded that there was a high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among physiotherapy clinical students. These outcomes suggest that more attention needs to be given to improving physiotherapy clinical students’ mental health, which will ultimately improve learning outcomes. Clinical implications: The long-term effects of psychological distress could potentially impact students’ academic performance. It may also have long-lasting effects after graduation. Therefore, students who are at risk of developing psychological symptoms are needed to be thoroughly examined and then receive early required interventions.
Ronel Roos, Heleen van Aswegen, Daleen Casteleijn, Catherine H. Thurling
Published: 21 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1830

Abstract:
Background: Physiotherapy skills such as suction and manual hyperinflation (MHI) are used to manage patients in intensive care. Performing these skills effectively and safely requires a level of expertise. It is unknown whether a once-off preclinical high-fidelity simulation activity incorporating these skills would translate to clinical practice inclusion. Objectives: To determine students’ perceptions of a simulation-based education (SBE) activity and clinical educators’ opinions of students’ implementation of skills into practice. Method: Our study consisted of two parts: a retrospective record review of students’ feedback with the Simulation Effectiveness Tool – Modified (SET-M) and the Simulation Laboratory Questionnaire. A nominal group technique (NGT) with clinical educators provided information on students’ skills implementation. Descriptive data analysis was undertaken. Results: Six SBE sessions, lasting 3 hours each, with 49 students (n = 8–9 students per session) were undertaken. Students perceived the teaching activity positively. Five (33.33%) of 15 clinical educators participated in the NGT. Participants had a mean age of 35.8 (± 8.9) years, were qualified for 13.9 (± 8.9) years and had been supervising students for 7.8 (± 6.7) years. The clinical educators’ top five opinions regarding students’ implementation of the intensive care unit (ICU) skills were: handling skills improved, students had greater confidence performing these skills, students were more observant of a patient’s response to the skill being performed, students had better theoretical knowledge and students had more accurate recall for precautions. Conclusion: Clinical educators reported a change in students’ clinical practice with regard to skills implementation. Clinical implications: A once-off preclinical SBE activity influences students’ ICU practice.
Yollande S. Djivoh, Toussaint Kpadonou, Thierry Puttemans, Dominique De Jaeger
Published: 15 November 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1776

Abstract:
Background: Diastasis recti is diagnosed when the interrecti distance (IRD) is larger than a threshold value. Published thresholds were measured at rest with ultrasound while in Benin physiotherapists use calipers during abdominal contraction. Objectives: The aim was to define IRD threshold values measured with calipers in Beninese participants in order to diagnose diastasis recti in a clinical environment and identify women needing abdominal rehabilitation. Method: Interrecti distance was measured using ultrasound and calipers. Linea alba stiffness was assessed by palpation, abdominal strength and endurance by manual testing. In men and nulliparous women, IRD threshold values were defined as IRD P90. In postpartum women, IRD P80 and a threshold defined with a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve based on linea alba stiffness were used. In these women, abdominal strength and endurance were compared depending on IRD threshold and linea alba stiffness with a Mann Whitney test. Results: In 391 Beninese participants, the IRD threshold measured with calipers was 17 mm in men, 15 mm in nulliparous and 18 mm (15 mm with ROC curve) in postpartum women. Postpartum women with an IRD above 18 mm had significantly lower abdominal strength. Those with a slack linea alba had significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance. Conclusion: The defined IRD threshold values can be used in a Beninese clinical environment. Future studies should confirm whether they can be applied to other African populations. Clinical implications: Abdominal rehabilitation should be recommended to postpartum women whose IRD is above the threshold values but also in cases of slack linea alba and poor abdominal function.
Loveness A. Nkhata, Yolandi Brink, Dawn Ernstzen, Diribsa Tsegaye, Quinnette Louw
Published: 20 October 2022
South African Journal of Physiotherapy, Volume 78; https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1622

Abstract:
The South African Journal of Physiotherapy is the official scholarly refereed journal of the South African Society of Physiotherapy. It aims to publish original research and facilitate continuing professional development for physiotherapists and other health professions both nationally and internationally.
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