Identifying Information and Tenor in Texts

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 01425471 / 1569979X
Total articles ≅ 907

Latest articles in this journal

Will Stahl-Timmins
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22007.sta

Abstract:
Surprise Machines is a project of experimental museology that sets out to visualize the entire image collection of the Harvard Art Museums, intending to open up unexpected vistas on more than 200,000 objects usually inaccessible to visitors. Part of the exhibition Curatorial A(i)gents organized by metaLAB (at) Harvard, the project explores the limits of artificial intelligence to display a large set of images and create surprise among visitors. To achieve such a feeling of surprise, a choreographic interface was designed to connect the audience’s movement with several unique views of the collection.
Yuchan Zhang, Jeanne-Louise Moys
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.21008.zha

Abstract:
This study examined changes to typographic variables in Chinese-English traffic signs. Particularly, it considered the effect of connecting spacing – the vertical distance between a Chinese legend and its English translation – on reading performance for participants who read English but not Chinese. Participants were shown driving video simulations, featuring four connecting space measures (1/6H, 1/3H, 1/2H, 3/4H where H is the height of one Chinese character) and asked to indicate directions. A threshold method with an accuracy check was applied. The study demonstrated that connecting spacing affected participants’ reading performance and is an important consideration for dual-script sign legibility.
María Del Mar Navarro
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22012.nav

Abstract:
This article introduces the Codices of The School of Huejotzingo as early examples of data visualization from sixteenth-century colonial México. The glyphs in the Codices and the technique of repetition are used to represent quantities. A similar approach was introduced four hundred years later in 1930s Vienna that would become known as Isotype. Similar to the Codices, Isotype used pictograms and repetition to represent quantities. A set of principles were established to design Isotype charts that were engaging and memorable. The Codices are analyzed using the principles of Isotype to contextualize and introduce them into the data visualization timeline.
Andrew Richardson, Duncan Hay
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22010.ric

Abstract:
This paper presents research on creating interactive prototypes for visualizing temporal spatial relationships in fictional literary texts. Developed within the context of the Chronotopic Cartographies project, a practice-led inquiry yielded dynamic visualizations from literary texts, the research explores the development and application of interactive three-dimensional environments illustrating the ‘chronotopic’, time-space relationships across a series of fictional literary texts. Expert feedback highlights the potential of the interaction model as a useful visual paradigm for supporting methods of reflective inquiry hypothesis making. The work also represents a potential model for creating interactive temporal visualizations which support hypothesis making across a broader sphere of the humanities.
Nicole Hengesbach, Greg J. McInerny, João Porto de Albuquerque
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22006.hen

Abstract:
Critical studies of data visualization often highlight how the reductive nature of visualization methods excludes data limitations and qualities that are crucial to understanding those data. This case study explores how a data visualization could express contingent, situated, and contextual facets of data. We examine how such data limitations might be surfaced and represented within visualizations through an interplay between the critique of an existing data visualization and the development of alternative designs. Based on a case study of urban tree data, we interrogate data limitations in relation to four different types of missingness: Incompleteness, Emptiness, Absence, and Nothingness. Our study enables reflections on how data limitations can be investigated using visualizations and considers the development of a critical visualization practice.
, Josefina Bravo, Al Edwards, Julie Hart,
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22011.wal

Abstract:
This paper summarises a cross-disciplinary project that explored ways of making instructions, funded as part of the UK COVID-19 rapid-response initiative. The project explored ways of making instructions for COVID-19 Lateral Flow Tests easy for lay people to use. Our method comprised rapid design decision making, where we used existing research, good practice in information design and consultation with diagnostic experts as part of the design process. Iterative review by a panel of users informed the development of prototype instructions: small studies investigated user preference for diagrams, and gathered feedback on the graphic articulation of the procedural steps involved in carrying out the test.
Maggie Hendrie, Hillary Mushkin, Santiago Lombeyda, Scott Davidoff
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.22009.hen

Abstract:
Data visualization frequently provides audiences with novel semantic and computational presentations. How does a multifaceted team expand this scope by harnessing the power of visualization as a tool to think with? The NASA JPL/Caltech/ ArtCenter data visualization program demonstrates how scientific knowledge, shaped from data and theory, is equally co-constructed from diverse human perspectives. We will share case studies from Mars Rover Path planning and PIXLISE, a visual reasoning tool for understanding planetary geology. Working from source data through mixed media artifacts, these projects explore co-design methods for complex scientific domains with real-world applications. Our methodology emphasizes that all participants in the co-design process are both learners and experts. In this dynamic, the design and coding process are unique modes of critical discovery.
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.20026.ata

Abstract:
This article argues in favor of representing the spatial distribution of information within and between documents, by surveying a broad variety of potential applications, including the entire document lifecycle, multiple sensory modalities, and a large spectrum of tasks and users. The theoretical explanations of this richness are a further facet of the article, and can be summarized as follows: (1) insights emerge from focusing on information structure, rather than information meaning; (2) spatializing information creates new information; (3) simplification increases the polyvalence of representation models; (4) introducing mystery in communication channels motivates discovery and diversifies insights; (5) approaching information design as a Gesamtkunstwerk multiplies the applications; (6) information is a manifestation of a link between structures and the actions these enable, while information design is the art and science of creating such links. The argument is developed around the concrete example of a document structure visualization, the Document Towers, which uses the metaphor of architectural models to represent documents.
Jelle Strikwerda, ,
Identifying information and tenor in texts; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.21011.str

Abstract:
Pension participants face complex decisions which require them to choose between multiple alternatives that have different consequences, that vary in likelihood, and that often relate to different values. In the medical domain, ample research has been conducted on how to support patients in making such decisions, yielding three important lessons. First, by emphasizing the gist of information, the information becomes more meaningful to participants. Second, value clarification methods should be used to help participants retrieve or form their own values and compare those with the decision alternatives. Third, simple static visual aids facilitate the comprehension of statistics and probabilities.
Guillermina Noël, Janet Joy, Carmen Dyck
Identifying information and tenor in texts, Volume 23, pp 104-122; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.23.1.11noe

Abstract:
Improving the quality of patient care, generally referred to as Quality Improvement (QI), is a constant mission of healthcare. Although QI initiatives take many forms, these typically involve collecting data to measure whether changes to procedures have been made as planned, and whether those changes have achieved the expected outcomes. In principle, such data are used to measure the success of a QI initiative and make further changes if needed. In practice, however, many QI data reports provide only limited insight into changes that could improve patient care. Redesigning standard approaches to QI data can help close the gap between current norms and the potential of QI data to improve patient care. This paper describes our study of QI data needs among healthcare providers and managers at Vancouver Coastal Health, a regional health system in Canada. We present an overview of challenges faced by healthcare providers around QI data collection and visualization, and illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of different visualizations. At present, user– centred and evidence–based design is practically unknown in healthcare QI, and thus offers an important new contribution.
Back to Top Top