Culture, Health & Sexuality

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN: 13691058 / 14645351
Published by: Informa UK Limited
Total articles ≅ 2,036

Latest articles in this journal

Published: 13 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2161638

Abstract:
For people living with HIV, decisions about when, how and who to tell about their HIV status can involve navigating complex social, legal and health domains. With a focus on disclosure to broader social and familial networks, we explored the experiences of, and motivations for, HIV (non-)disclosure among recently diagnosed people living with HIV in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 people diagnosed with HIV from 2016 onwards, of whom 25 completed follow-up interviews. Participants commonly reported anticipating negative responses and rejection from others when considering whether to disclose their HIV status. Some participants also took on the role of ensuring others’ wellbeing when disclosing (or not), even as they themselves needed emotional support. Finally, some participants felt it important to be open about their HIV status to raise awareness of HIV and challenge HIV-related stigma. Our findings highlight the complex relational and social contexts that shape HIV disclosure. In addition to supporting individual people living with HIV when disclosing, we argue that educational programmes that target the broader, HIV-negative population are needed to shift the social landscape in which people living with HIV disclose.
Published: 12 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2164799

Abstract:
Using data from the 2017 Chinese General Social Survey, this study is one of the first to directly compare the effect of reciprocal versus authoritarian filial piety on the Chinese public attitudes towards same-sex sexual behaviour using a nationally representative sample. Consistent with previous research, the findings from this study reveal that endorsing reciprocal and authoritarian filial piety exert qualitatively different influences on public attitudes towards same-sex sexual behaviour. While reciprocal filial piety was not linked to disapproval of same-sex sexual behaviour in the current study, authoritarian filial piety was found to significantly predict a disproving attitude. This effect remained statistically significant even after controlling for other demographic and social-psychological variables commonly identified to predict homophobia. Findings from this study further our knowledge of the critical yet nuanced role of filial piety in shaping public attitudes towards same-sex sexual behaviour in China. In terms of implications for policy and practice, organised efforts should aim to steer public interpretations of filial piety away from its authoritarian dimension through education, advocacy and activism.
Nompumelelo Doyisa, Pranitha Maharaj,
Published: 12 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2164065

Abstract:
In sub-Saharan Africa, sexual relationships between younger women and older men have been shown to pose a risk of HIV transmission. In South Africa, there has been growing interest in blesser–blessee relationships. This study explores perceptions of these relationships among university students in Durban, South Africa. The study draws on 15 in-depth interviews with students. Participants suggest that older men engage in these relationships for sexual gratification and younger women do so for monetary or material gain. Interviews revealed that participants believed that these relationships are common with both men and women engaging in them and putting themselves at risk of HIV infection. It is imperative to explore the context and motivation for these relationships because of their broader social and health implications. In addition, greater effort should be geared towards addressing the underlying factors that facilitate blesser–blessee relationships.
, Avery Veldhouse, Shahin Payam
Published: 12 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2164064

Abstract:
In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, some US state governments banned abortion due to its allegedly ‘elective’ nature. While these actions were successfully challenged in courts, discussion about the topic may have shaped personal and public opinion. This study aimed to explore the framing of abortion in local newspapers during the onset of the pandemic. Articles regarding abortion were collected from three top circulated local online news publications from three southern US states. Of the states that attempted to block abortions, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi were selected for their high non-White populations. Using critical thematic analysis, 77 articles were analysed, and four themes were identified: individual-centric, public health risk, interplay with inequalities, and hierarchical health care. Existing abortion narratives were taken up by different sides of the debate to push political agendas. However, new pro-/anti-abortion justifications were observed, specifically regarding public health concerns during COVID-19. Anti-abortion activists framed abortion provision as a health risk and employed other narratives that likely reinforced gendered, ethnic and socioeconomic power disparities by shifting blame onto abortion seekers and providers. However, pro-choice supporters framed abortion as essential health care and as a structural issue, which may have bolstered awareness for structural change.
Published: 6 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2155707

Abstract:
Women are often portrayed as the victims of pornography. Their active consumption and the ways in which pornography shapes their sexuality are still under-researched. This article has three goals: to explore how and why young women watch pornography; to analyse how they perceive the influence of pornography on their sexual scripts; and to determine related positive and negative factors. Guided by sexual script theory, I thematically analysed responses from an open-ended form completed by 80 young Czech women (18-30 years old). The analysis resulted in six themes related to cultural, interpersonal and intrapsychic sexual scripts – in other words, the domains of what is societally appropriate, interpersonal relationships, and inner desires. These findings have important implications: pornography simultaneously influences several domains of sexuality. Findings show that under certain conditions, pornography may be beneficial for sexual empowerment and sexual satisfaction, but at the same time, it may also produce negative effects – providing a complex and often contradictory experience for the individual.
, Valerie L. Graveline, Alicia M. Murphy, Elizabeth S. Rodericks
Published: 5 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2162972

Abstract:
Contraceptive responsibility has historically fallen on women in the context of heterosexual relationships, often resulting in a perceived burden on their emotional and reproductive health. We conducted in-depth, individual interviews with women and men in college to investigate factors influencing the choices they make regarding contraceptive use and more specifically their perceptions and willingness to try new sperm-targeting contraceptives. Thematic analysis revealed factors at a societal, interpersonal, and individual level affecting participants’ perceptions and imagined decisions. Societally, a perceived gendered divide continues to exist placing primary responsibility for contraceptive use on women. Interpersonally, the context of a relationship increased partners’ feelings of empathy and willingness to try alternative contraceptive methods; and individually participants remained concerned about their own sexual and reproductive safety. Findings indicate that societal level norms need to be shifted towards the acceptability of sperm-targeting contraceptives or other versions of contraceptives that act on male bodies, in addition to a greater focus on their development. It is proposed that this would help to ease the continued undue burden placed on women for reproductive health.
, , Djordje X. Modrakovic, , John F. Dovidio, , Michael Kharfen, ,
Published: 4 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2157491

Abstract:
The high incidence of HIV among US Black sexual minority men is a public health crisis that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV can help address. Public health campaigns, which often include pictures of Black sexual minority men alongside PrEP-related messaging, have been developed to encourage PrEP awareness and uptake. However, the acceptability of the messaging within these campaigns among Black sexual minority men is unclear. We conducted four focus groups with 18 HIV-negative Black sexual minority men in Washington, DC to explore their perspectives regarding promotional messaging (textual elements) in PrEP visual advertisements, including their reactions to three large-scale public health campaigns. Primary themes included: (1) the need for additional information about PrEP, (2) preference for slogan simplicity, (3) the desire to normalise PrEP use, and (4) mixed views on the inclusion of condoms. Results indicated that the messaging in current PrEP visual advertisements may not sufficiently address Black sexual minority men’s questions about PrEP. Providing basic PrEP information and methods to access more information; using simple, unambiguous language; presenting PrEP use in a destigmatising, normalising fashion; and conveying the relevance of condoms if included in the advertisement could help increase the acceptability of future PrEP advertising among Black sexual minority men.
, Jennifer Cherry, Lauren Mizock, Anna DiStefano, Jenna Tosh, Cheri Gurse
Published: 2 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2159066

Abstract:
Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine individuals identifying as LGBTQ to identify recommendations for improving sexual and reproductive healthcare at a local clinic on the California Central Coast. Interviewees were recruited at local Pride events. Grounded theory methodology revealed several themes related to participants’ desires for a LGBTQ-affirmative sexual and reproductive healthcare setting. Themes identified included: Beyond Enacted Inclusivity (avoiding a performative demonstration of LGBTQ-affirming care); Anti-Institutional Care (a political and visual challenge to what the healthcare setting should look like), a One-Stop-Shop (encompassing several types of care under one roof); Constrained Visibility (where LGBTQ identities are reflected but not exposed); and Community and Social Wellness (to be in community with other LGBTQ-serving organisations and one another in mutual support and celebration). Research implications and clinical recommendations are described at the local and system levels.
, , , Khuthadzo Hlongwane, Naomi Hill, Venice Mbowane, Glenda Gray, Jenny Coetzee
Published: 2 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2160014

Abstract:
To deepen our understanding of sex work stigma, and to its drivers and their interrelation, we conducted an analysis using structural equation modelling of the South African National Sex Worker Survey. We enrolled 3005 women in sex work using multi-stage sampling across all South Africa’s provinces. Experience of external/enacted and internalised stigma was widespread. Non-partner rape, intimate partner violence and partner controlling behaviour (often expressions of external/enacted stigma) compounded internalised stigma. These experiences of violence, other manifestations of external/enacted stigma and food insecurity, were key drivers of internalised stigma, and often had an impact on mental health. We found that considerable protection against stigma emanated from viewing sex work positively. This resistance to stigma provided opportunities to shift the narrative. Reducing sex workers’ exposure to external/enacted stigmatising behaviour, including by enabling more to work indoors, and providing greater protection from partner violence and rape, are critical for better health and well-being. Ending the criminalisation of sex work is foundational for safer working conditions and better health outcomes for sex workers, similarly providing adequately funded mental and physical health and social care through sex work specific programmes.
, Danielle de Moissac, Ndeye Rokhaya Gueye, Stephan Hardy, Jacqueline Avanthay-Strus
Published: 2 January 2023
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2160016

Abstract:
The intersecting identities of those identifying with multiple minorities, such as 2SLGBTQ + and ethnolinguistic minorities, bring individuals to have unique experiences, especially concerning health and wellness. This topic is particularly poorly understood among French-speaking official language minority 2SLGBTQ + populations in Canada. Hence, this study was conducted to generate insights into their needs and experiences, through the lens of intersectionality. This quantitative community-based study, a first of its kind in Western Canada, describes the sociodemographic profile, experiences of discrimination and stigmatisation, and needs and challenges pertaining to mental health and social supports of this double minority group. Data were obtained by an online survey conducted in the Canadian province of Manitoba in June 2020. The participant sample was largely homogenous: most were under the age of 55 years, white, educated, and from urban areas. Many reported experiencing dual marginalisation, feeling unaccepted by both of their minority communities (Francophone and 2SLGBTQ+). A sense of isolation, as well as a lack of social connectedness and psychological support, were often reported. Social initiatives and mental health support within environments proactively affirming of the official language of the minority and inclusive of diverse 2SLGBTQ + identities are needed.
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