Journal EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture

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Jockie Zudhy Fibrianto, Mochamad Hilmy
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 65-70; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.177

Abstract:The road corridor in Pontianak City has different shading output depending on the sun orientation. The difference has caused a temperature difference that affects the pedestrian thermal comfort along the corridor. Identification and measurement of shading temperatures that occur due to buildings and trees were carried out for three days in each afternoon with relatively similar weather conditions. The road corridor that becomes the research location was at A. Yani St.-Gajah Mada St.-Tanjung Pura St., which has a North-South orientation and Teuku Umar St.-Diponegoro St.-Sisingamangaraja St., who has an East-West direction. The analysis phase is done by comparing the effectiveness of imagery produced by buildings and trees. After that, the identification and measurement results are compared with Indonesian thermal comfort standards SNI T-14-1993-03 to obtain suitable thermal comfort in the road corridors in Pontianak City.
Efa Suriani
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 54-64; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.338

Abstract:Bamboo and wood are natural materials, each of which has a variety of uniqueness. Among its uniqueness is an irreplaceable building material between one another. However, weaknesses are also found in them especially related to termites or powder beetles. To be able to obtain maximum results in the use of these two materials, the preservation process was needed as a special treatment. With a variety of Bamboo preservation techniques, this paper tries to identify and examine various studies and best practices related to the Bambu-kayu preservation method in Indonesia. A qualitative approach was used with literature study techniques, field observations and in-depth interviews with entrepreneurs in preserving bamboo. From the results of the study obtained an illustration that the preservation method carried out depends on the needs of the user. It is also known that 10% Borak Boric concentrate has been able to be a chemical preservative that can be trusted to maximize material age. There should also be research on other preservatives, both chemical ones such as pyrolysis oil from plastic waste, as well as natural ones such as coconut shell liquid smoke and tobacco. Further research can also be focused on the strength of bamboo preserved by the preservation / boiling method. In addition to optimal material service age, it is necessary to consider several other criteria such as the ability to be mass produced / according to industry needs and able to be implemented significantly. Thus, it is expected that preservatives will be obtained that are safe for humans, environmentally friendly, workable and economical.
Mega Ayundya Widiastuti
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 44-53; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.323

Abstract:Early childhood education is an essential stage for the development of children's ability to attend school. Early age is the best phase for children to receive stimulation as well as their character formation in the future. The physical environment plays a vital role in supporting the successful establishment of children's behavior. One of them is through the design of classrooms that are suitable for the child's world. This study attempted to evaluate the interior arrangement of the school in the formation of children's behavior along with its influence on children's behavior in the Sakha Islamic Play Group / Kindergarten. This study uses a descriptive method with a qualitative approach and observation techniques on various aspects of the class physical arrangement. The results of the study concluded that some elements of the interior provision of classes in the Sakha Islamic Play Group / Kindergarten, such as the visibility and comfort, were not in accordance with the standards, while the classroom interior arrangement had influenced the children's behavior with the barrier mechanism and invited some specific children behaviors to shape their personality.
Khilda Wildana Nur
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 37-43; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.173

Abstract:An early Tasawwuf has already existed since Islam religion was first brought to Indonesia in which Tariqa traditions contributed to the spread of the faith. The Tariqa of Khalwatiyah Samman is one of the Islamic mysticisms which has developed and been in existence until now. The number of the Tariqa’s followers reaches hundred thousand of people spread in various loci including Patte’ne village in Maros Regency, South Sulawesi. The strategic location becomes an urbanity anomaly toward the surrounding integrated area. The Patte’ne village promotes its existential identity as a consistent locus tied to Khalwatiyah Tariqa. The implementation of this can be seen in the spatial pattern of the area, in the cultural values reflecting the activities applied either in daily rituals or annually ceremonial agendas, and in the human resources acted as role models adopted from the Khalwatiyah teaching. The approach of this research uses both descriptive research and a historical approach. The methods of data collecting are surveys, visual materials, and observations. The result of this research indicates that a village will stand valuable if the concept of urbanity remains existent, in the form of both social and economic systems. The implication of those various sectors can create a condition and a balancing role for all the components creating the surrounding area. It demonstrates that the existence of Patte’ne village has become a locus which energizes an urbanity performance, which means that all the available resources have respectively participated so that it creates a mutually symbiotic relationship.
Muhammad Zakaria Umar, La Ode Abdul Rachmad Sabdin Andisiri
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 30-36; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.221

Abstract:Coexistence in architecture was considered as the process of cooperation between two or more different architectural styles and synergized each others. The Old Buton society consists of Kaomu, Walaka, Maradika, and Batua. The social stratification system in Buton society was reflected in its dwelling. In the architectural context, various attempts to rediscover the identity in each of his work were very pronounced, with varying results. The study was aimed to identified coexistence between Walaka’s house and parliament building using a comparative causal approach. The results concluded that the coexistence between the Walaka’s houses and parliament building could be found in the form of philosophical, meanings, symbols, function on the modified floor plan, view, and sections.The coexistence between the house of Walaka’s with govermental position and parliament building could not be found between under the Walaka’s house and the parliament building foundation, tangkebala sasambiri and overstek console at parliament building and the Walaka’s box-shaped pabate and the overstek console from parliament building. The philosophical coexistence was also not founded between wide large and latticed windows at Walaka’s house with ones at parliament building, the Walaka’s bosu bosu and the overstek console without ornament at parliament building, as well as the Walaka’s double-decker roof and the parliament’s double-decker roof.
Atthaillah Atthaillah, Suhartina Wijayanti, Soraya Masthura Hassan
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 21-29; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.228

Abstract:The department of architecture’s building of Malikussaleh University was found problematic with its daylighting distribution through out the spaces. Also, earlier research had acknowledged the situation. However, the previous research did not offer an appropriate solution particularly regarding its optimum façade design. This research attempted to optimize the daylight harvest into the spaces by comparing its façade design for daylighting. There were three types of façade designs, perforated, vertical and horizontal screens, examined fot its most optimum daylight harvest. This study utilized digital simulation using Grasshopper and Ladybug Tools to calculate Annual daylight condition within the building. Within the tools this study integrated Climate Based Daylight Modeling (CBDM), which was Useful Daylight Illuminance (UDI) for the condition of Lhokseumawe. Next, it compared and suggested the result for the three types of façade design for optimum daylight distribution. Based on UDI, the targetted optimum daylight was in the range of 100-2000 lux. It was discovered that horizontal screen work best to almost entire building façades which covered 13 out of 15 examined-spaces within the building.
Mochamad Hilmy, Dewi Ria Indriana
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 13-20; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.222

Abstract:The purpose of this study was to obtained recommendations on the use of innovative building materials from the development of existing lightweight concrete designs, to decrease the building interior temperature. The research used an engineering experimental method on lightweight concrete as material tested. A profile was attached on the outer side of lightweight concrete in order to formed a shadowed effect and expected to make the building indoor temperature go lower. The result indicated that the shadows shaped by profile attached on the outer side of lightweight concrete not fully effectively in decreasing building indoor temperature. The lightweight concrete thickness affected the velocity of solar thermal radiation impact movement that goes into the buildings interior. The formation of profiles on lightweight concrete surfaces can be decrease the room temperature in at least more than 2°C. The shading was more effective if the profile form in vertical formation. The research output was a lightweight concrete prototype that was able to contribute to decrease the building indoor temperature.
Muhammad Nelza Mulki Iqbal
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 4, pp 1-12; doi:10.29080/emara.v4i1.174

Abstract:Social capital discourse has come to be the foremost and essential aspects in achieving sustainable development, participatory democracy and just cities. Indonesia is like most Asian countries where people spatially and socially co-live in a community that is related to a network of small clusters. However, the formal study related to social capital is hardly founded. Based on its characters, Gotong Royong which is a socio-cultural ethic of the togetherness philosophy in Indonesia can be perceived as an Indonesian social capital practice. Advancing social capital through participatory approaches will need a deep consideration about the role of professional and community engagement. Successful collaborations between wider actors in participatory approaches could lead to a fundamental transformation that can both preserve and nurture social capital values. High level of social capital within communities can potentially underpin the successful community participation towards communal goals.
Arina Hayati, Kirami Bararatin, Iwan Adi Indrawan, Nurfahmi Muchlis
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 3, pp 91-97; doi:10.29080/emara.2017.3.2.91-97

Abstract:The provision of an inclusive environment was one of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 11 targets that was also listed in the declaration document of the 2016 NUA (New Urban Agenda) Habitat III. This was no exception for the public buildings and transport facilities provision that should meet and accommodate the needs of all users including persons with disabilities, the elderly, children, and women. Currently, Indonesia has committed to ratify and implement the CRPD, including the enactment of several regulations and the provision of access environment in public buildings. However, such implementation has not been maximized and complies with standards based on inclusion design. This paper is part of a Research-Based-Community Service to observe and evaluate bus stop and the pedestrian way in Surabaya. Yet, the discussion only highlights the result of pre-eliminary study of accessibility condition at bus stop based user paricpation. Methods of observation and environmental simulation were used to obtain research data. The results show various problems caused by lack of user participation and understanding and information on the design of accessible environment. This led to many application designs on the environment not in accordance with existing regulations and the needs of users especially those with special needs.
Arina Hayati, Kirami Bararatin, Iwan Adi Indrawan, Nurfahmi Muchlis
EMARA: Indonesian Journal of Architecture, Volume 3, pp 91-97; doi:10.29080/emara.v3i2.175

Abstract:The provision of an inclusive environment was one of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 11 targets that was also listed in the declaration document of the 2016 NUA (New Urban Agenda) Habitat III. This was no exception for the public buildings and transport facilities provision that should meet and accommodate the needs of all users including persons with disabilities, the elderly, children, and women. Currently, Indonesia has committed to ratify and implement the CRPD, including the enactment of several regulations and the provision of access environment in public buildings. However, such implementation has not been maximized and complies with standards based on inclusion design. This paper is part of a Research-Based-Community Service to observe and evaluate bus stop and the pedestrian way in Surabaya. Yet, the discussion only highlights the result of pre-eliminary study of accessibility condition at bus stop based user paricpation. Methods of observation and environmental simulation were used to obtain research data. The results show various problems caused by lack of user participation and understanding and information on the design of accessible environment. This led to many application designs on the environment not in accordance with existing regulations and the needs of users especially those with special needs.
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