Journal Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology

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Gautam Ray
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5, pp 1-20; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2017.00024

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Wen-Tao Bo Jun Yin
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2016.00071

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Alessandro Mantovani
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5, pp 1-8; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2017.00005

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Robert S. Rahimi Saleh Elwir
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5, pp 1-10; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2016.00069

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Manoj Kumar Suman Lata Nayak
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5, pp 1-9; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2016.00063

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Arthur J McCullough Mark CC Cheah
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 5, pp 1-11; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2017.00009

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Haleh Vaziri Richa Bhardwaj
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 6, pp 1-9; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2017.00035

Abstract:Chylous ascites (CA) is a rare form of ascites that results from the leakage of lipid-rich lymph into the peritoneal cavity. This usually occurs due to trauma and rupture of the lymphatics or increased peritoneal lymphatic pressure secondary to obstruction. The underlying etiologies for CA have been classified as traumatic, congenital, infectious, neoplastic, postoperative, cirrhotic or cardiogenic. Since malignancy and cirrhosis account for about two-thirds of all the cases of CA in Western countries, in this article we have attempted to reclassify CA based on portal and non-portal etiologies. The diagnosis of CA is based on the distinct characteristic of the ascitic fluid which includes a milky appearance and a triglyceride level of >200 mg/dL. The management consists of identifying and treating the underlying disease process, dietary modification, and diuretics. Some studies have also supported the use of agents such as orlistat, somatostatin, octreotide and etilefrine. Paracentesis and surgical interventions in the form of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (commonly known as TIPS), peritoneal shunt, angiography with embolization of a leaking vessel, and laparotomy remain as treatment options for cases refractory to medical management.
Jordan M. Cloyd Amir A. Rahnemai-Azar
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 6, pp 1-8; doi:10.14218/JCTH.2017.00060

Abstract:Liver resection is increasingly used for a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Despite advances in preoperative selection, surgical technique and perioperative management, posthepatectomy liver failure (PHLF) is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following liver resection. Given the devastating physiological consequences of PHLF and the lack of effective treatment options, identifying risk factors and preventative strategies for PHLF is paramount. In the past, a major limitation to conducting high quality research on risk factors and prevention strategies for PHLF has been the absence of a standardized definition. In this article, we describe relevant definitions for PHLF, discuss risk factors and prediction models, and review advances in liver assessment tools and PHLF prevention strategies.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology; doi:10.14218/jcth

Sammy Saab, Peter G. Konyn, Matthew R. Viramontes, Melissa A. Jimenez, Jonathan F. Grotts, Wally Hamidzadah, Veronica P. Dang, Negin L. Esmailzadeh, Gina Choi, Francisco A. Durazo, et al.
Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, Volume 4, pp 281-287; doi:10.14218/jcth.2016.00049

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