Research Ideas and Outcomes

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EISSN : 2367-7163
Published by: Pensoft Publishers (10.3897)
Total articles ≅ 343
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, Szilárd-Lehel Bücs, , , Pierrette Nyssen, Kaloust Paragamian, Axel Ssymank, Hannah Weigand, Valerija Zakšek, Maja Zagmajster, et al.
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e85859

Abstract:
This manuscript summarizes the outcomes of the 6th EuroSpeleo Protection Symposium. Special emphasis was laid on presenting and discussing monitoring activities under the umbrella of the Habitats Directive (EU Council Directive 92/43/EEC) for habitat type 8310 "Caves not open to the public" and the Emerald Network. The discussions revealed a high level of variation in the currently conducted underground monitoring activities: there is no uniform definition of what kind of underground environments the "cave" habitat should cover, how often a specific cave has to be monitored, and what parameters should be measured to evaluate the conservation status. The variation in spatial dimensions in national definitions of caves further affects the number of catalogued caves in a country and the number of caves to be monitored. Not always participants are aware of the complete national monitoring process and that data sets should be freely available or easily accessible. The discussions further showed an inherent dilemma between an anticipated uniform monitoring approach with a coherent assessment methodology and, on the contrary, the uniqueness of caves and subterranean biota to be assessed – combined with profound knowledge gaps and a lack of resources. Nevertheless, some good practices for future cave monitoring activities have been identified by the participants: (1) Cave monitoring should focus on bio- and geodiversity elements alike; (2) Local communities should be involved, and formal agreements envisaged; (3) Caves must be understood as windows into the subterranean realm; (4) Touristic caves should not be excluded ad-hoc from regular monitoring; (5) New digital tools and open FAIR data infrastructures should be implemented; (6) Cave biomonitoring should focus on a large(r) biological diversity; and (7) DNA-based tools should be integrated. Finally, the importance of the 'forgotten' Recommendation No. 36 from the Bern Convention as a guiding legal European document was highlighted.
Radia Belkeziz
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e82995

Abstract:
Smart Farming is a concept developing rapidly and gaining momentum. The management of livestock and farm products is done in an automated way thanks to IoT technology. The large field of data at hand offers the possibility of analysis for a better understanding of issues and more efficient decision-making. The management of water consumption is one of the most relevent Smart Farming use cases. In the event of drought, the pressure on water resources becomes increasingly strong. What if we produced water then? The idea of not worrying about the consequence of drought on agricultural production would be interesting. One of the first experiences you learn in a chemistry class is that the combustion of dihydrogen produces water. However, it is necessary to follow this experience closely because of the risk of explosion. Dihydrogen can be produced by the gasification of (agricultural) biomass. Here, the technology takes over, by the means of a supervising IoT system. This system will manage the overall process from biomass production, then dihydrogen production (biomass-to-hydrogen), to water production (dihydrogen-to-water). If the idea proves to be viable on a large scale, the result would be valuable in reducing the issue of water scarcity, in times of drought, in agricultural areas, and even in allowing energy autonomy on farms.
, Anna Beer, Ina Blümel, Carsten Elsner, , Dagmar Holste, Benjamin Kampe, Micky Lindlar, Gelareh Mofakhamsanie, Andreas Noback, et al.
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e82563

Abstract:
University Library Braunschweig (UB Braunschweig), University and State Library Darmstadt (ULB Darmstadt), TIB – Leibniz Information Centre for Technology and Natural Sciences and the Fraunhofer Information Centre for Planning and Building (Fraunhofer IRB) are jointly establishing a specialised information service (FID, "Fachinformationsdienst") for the disciplines of civil engineering, architecture and urbanism. The FID BAUdigital, which is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG, "Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft"), will provide researchers working on digital design, planning and production methods in construction engineering with a joint information, networking and data exchange platform and support them with innovative services for documentation, archiving and publication in their data-based research.
Alessandra Pugnetti, Elisabetta Manea, Ivica Vilibić, , , Bruno Cataletto, Elisabeth De Maio, Carlo Franzosini, Ivana Golec, Marco Gottardi, et al.
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e82597

Abstract:
This Policy Brief succinctly presents the Ecological Observing System of the Adriatic Sea (ECOAdS), aimed at integrating the ecological and oceanographic dimensions within the conservation strategy of the Natura 2000 network, and to propose a way to go for its future development and maintenance. After a definition of marine ecological observatories, we describe the current structure of ECOAdS, its key components and potential relevance in relation to the main European strategies for biodiversity and marine observation for the next decade. Finally, we suggest some actions that could be undertaken for the future development of ECOAdS, targeting possible perspectives in different regional, macro-regional, national and European strategic contexts. This Policy Brief is one of the outcomes of the Interreg Italy-Croatia Project ECOSS (ECological Observing System in the Adriatic Sea: oceanographic observations for biodiversity; https://www.italy-croatia.eu/web/ecoss), which had the main purpose to design and carry out the first steps for the establishment of ECOAdS.
, Martin Bencsik, Lina De Smet, , Marten Schoonman, José Paulo Sousa, , Wim Verbeke, , Coby van Dooremalen
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e84129

Abstract:
A key to healthy beekeeping is the Health Status Index (HIS) inspired by EFSA’s Healthy-B toolbox which we will make fully operational, with the active collaboration of beekeepers, by facilitating the coordinated and harmonised flow of data from various sources and by testing and validating each component thoroughly. We envisage a stepby-step expansion of participating apiaries, and will eventually cover all EU biogeographic regions. The key to a sustainable beekeeping is a better understanding of its socio-economics, particularly within local value chains, its relationship with bee health and the human-ecosystem equilibrium of the beekeeping sector and to implement these insights into the data processing and decision making. We will fully integrate socio-economic analyses, identify viable business models tailored to different contexts for European beekeeping and determine the carrying capacity of the landscape. In close cooperation with the EU Bee Partnership, an EU-wide bee health and management data platform and affiliated project website will be created to enable sharing of knowledge and learning between scientists and stakeholders within and outside the consortium. We will utilise and further expand the classification of the open source IT-application for digital beekeeping, BEEP, to streamline the flow of data related to beekeeping management, the beehive and its environment (landscape, agricultural practices, weather and climate) from various sources. The dynamic bee health and management data platform will allow us to identify correlative relationships among factors impacting the HSI, assess the risk of emerging pests and predators, and enable beekeepers to develop adaptive management strategies that account for local and EU-wide issues. Reinforcing and establishing, where necessary, new multi-actor networks of collaboration will engender a lasting learning and innovation system to ensure socialecological resilient and sustainable beekeeping.
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e83789

Abstract:
In the age of advanced information systems powering fast-paced knowledge economies that face global societal challenges, it is no longer adequate to express scholarly information - an essential resource for modern economies - primarily as article narratives in document form. Despite being a well-established tradition in scholarly communication, PDF-based text publishing is hindering scientific progress as it buries scholarly information into non-machine-readable formats. The key objective of SKG4EOSC is to improve science productivity through development and implementation of services for text and data conversion, and production, curation, and re-use of FAIR scholarly information. This will be achieved by (1) establishing the Open Research Knowledge Graph (ORKG, orkg.org), a service operated by the SKG4EOSC coordinator, as a Hub for access to FAIR scholarly information in the EOSC; (2) lifting to EOSC of numerous and heterogeneous domain-specific research infrastructures through the ORKG Hub’s harmonized access facilities; and (3) leverage the Hub to support cross-disciplinary research and policy decisions addressing societal challenges. SKG4EOSC will pilot the devised approaches and technologies in four research domains: biodiversity crisis, precision oncology, circular processes, and human cooperation. With the aim to improve machine-based scholarly information use, SKG4EOSC addresses an important current and future need of researchers. It extends the application of the FAIR data principles to scholarly communication practices, hence a more comprehensive coverage of the entire research lifecycle. Through explicit, machine actionable provenance links between FAIR scholarly information, primary data and contextual entities, it will substantially contribute to reproducibility, validation and trust in science. The resulting advanced machine support will catalyse new discoveries in basic research and solutions in key application areas.
Tanya Haupt, Jamie Ceasar, , Charles von der Meden, Robyn Payne, Luther Adams, Darrell Anders, Anthony Bernard, , Wayne Florence, et al.
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e81563

Abstract:
Originating from the Second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2), the main goal of the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) Regional Benthic Imagery Workshop, was to provide information and training on the use of various underwater imagery platforms in benthic research. To date, attempts made to explore the bottom of the ocean range from simple diving bells to more advanced camera systems, and the rapidly expanding field of underwater image-based research has supported marine exploration in many forms, from biodiversity surveys, spatial analyses and temporal studies, to monitoring schemes. Alongside the increasing use of underwater camera systems worldwide, there is an evident need to improve training and access to these techniques for students and researchers from institutes within the WIO. The week-long virtual event was conducted between 30 August and 3 September 2021 with 266 participants. Sessions consisted of lessons, practical demonstrations and interactive discussions which covered the steps required to conduct underwater imagery surveys, taking participants through elements of sampling design, data acquisition and processing, considerations for statistical analysis and, effective managment of data. The session recordings from the workshop are available online as a teaching aid which has the potential to reach marine researchers both regionally and globally. It is crucial that we build on this momentum by continuing to develop and strengthen the network established through this initiative for standardised benthic-image-based research within the WIO.
, Martina Kutmon, , Denise Slenter
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e83031

Abstract:
Like humans have a unique social security number and different phone numbers from various providers, so do proteins and metabolites have a unique structure but different identifiers from various databases. BridgeDb is an interoperability platform that allows combining these databases, by matching database-specific identifiers. These matches are called identifier mappings, and they are indispensable when combining experimental (omics) data with knowledge in reference databases. BridgeDb takes care of this interoperability between gene, protein, metabolite, and other databases, thus enabling seamless integration of many knowledge bases and wet-lab results. Since databases get updated continuously, so should the Open Science BridgeDb project.
Michael Greeff, Max Caspers, Vincent Kalkman, , Barry Sunderland, , Laurens Hogeweg
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e79187

Abstract:
Natural history collections play a vital role in biodiversity research and conservation by providing a window to the past. The usefulness of the vast amount of historical data depends on their quality, with correct taxonomic identifications being the most critical. The identification of many of the objects of natural history collections, however, is wanting, doubtful or outdated. Providing correct identifications is difficult given the sheer number of objects and the scarcity of expertise. Here we outline the construction of an ecosystem for the collaborative development and exchange of image recognition algorithms designed to support the identification of objects. Such an ecosystem will facilitate sharing taxonomic expertise among institutions by offering image datasets that are correctly identified by their in-house taxonomic experts. Together with openly accessible machine learning algorithms and easy to use workbenches, this will allow other institutes to train image recognition algorithms and thereby compensate for the lacking expertise.
Prasanth Sambaraju
Published: 25 February 2022
Research Ideas and Outcomes, Volume 8; https://doi.org/10.3897/rio.8.e79006

Abstract:
Solver is a Microsoft Excel add-in program which is used to find an optimal value for a formula in the objective cell. Solver accomplishes this either by maximizing, minimizing or setting the objective cell value to a specific value. The article presents the utility of in built worksheet events in Excel VBA to save the value of objective cell from each iteration when solver is used for optimization.
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