Adultspan Journal

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1524-6817 / 2161-0029
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell (10.1002)
Total articles ≅ 248
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
ESCI
Archived in
EBSCO
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

, Jamie Wood
Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 47-60; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12105

Abstract:
We explored the most important sources of meaning among emerging adults and whether time spent on social media had an effect on life meaning dimensions. Results showed that the majority of emerging adults mentioned family and friends when asked in an open‐ended question about things that make their life meaningful.
, Christian D. Chan, Justin Jordan, Robert A. Dobmeier, Sean Gorby
Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 3-16; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12102

Abstract:
Using quantitative content analysis, we categorized 76 out of 154 articles (49.35%) published in Adultspan Journal from 1999 to 2019 as focused on gerontological counseling. This study explored publication trends for these articles and compared results with a larger study (Fullen et al., 2019) on publication trends for gerontological counseling across all counseling‐related journals.
, Swaroop Kumar Korni, Claudette Brown‐Smythe, Rafael L. Outland, Patricia Williams‐McGahee, Anna N. LaDelfa, Joanna White
Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 29-46; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12104

Abstract:
We conducted a phenomenological study with 35 women in a substance abuse treatment jail program about their lived experiences in preparing for reentry. The women addressed their past, the needs of their families, and education of criminal justice personnel, providers, and the whole citizenry. The women advocated for effective reentry practices.
Suzanne Degges‐White
Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 2-2; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12101

Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12069

Margaret Rippeto, Elizabeth Stewart, Michelle Chowning, Sailee Karkhanis, , Leah Kepley
Published: 3 April 2021
Adultspan Journal, Volume 20, pp 17-28; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12103

Abstract:
Articles published in Adultspan Journal from 1999 to 2019 were analyzed for trends over time in author characteristics (e.g., leading contributors and institutions, work setting, gender, domicile) and article characteristics (e.g., reporting standards, topics, research design, participant characteristics, and statistical sophistication).
, Phyllis B. Post
Published: 11 October 2020
Adultspan Journal, Volume 19, pp 107-117; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12099

Abstract:
Counselors have the ethical responsibility to meet the mental health needs of refugees who are forced to leave their home countries. This study examined factors influencing the self‐efficacy of counselors (N = 98) working with refugees. The results revealed a relationship between trauma training and secondary traumatic stress and counselor self‐efficacy. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.
, Natoya Haskins, Cheryl Neale‐McFall, Jolie Ziomek‐Daigle, Emeline Eckart
Published: 11 October 2020
Adultspan Journal, Volume 19, pp 77-93; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12097

Abstract:
We examined factors that affected the work‐life enrichment and occupational satisfaction of 107 counselor educator mothers. Data were analyzed through content analysis. Results highlight various initiatives that could increase academic mothers' job satisfaction. Implications include the importance of providing policies and encouraging cultural norms that support working mothers.
, Rebecca G. Cowan
Published: 11 October 2020
Adultspan Journal, Volume 19, pp 67-76; https://doi.org/10.1002/adsp.12096

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between the attachment style, self‐esteem, and psychological well‐being of women ages 25–55 whose fathers were absent during childhood. Results indicated a statistically significant correlation between attachment style and self‐esteem. Implications for practice are provided.
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