European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

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ISSN / EISSN : 0934-9723 / 1435-4373
Published by: Springer Nature (10.1007)
Total articles ≅ 9,629
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, Augustinas Slucka, Evangelos I Kritsotakis
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-9; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04455-y

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Xiaoxiao Guo, Qiaoling Ruan, Jialin Jin, Jianming Zheng, Lingyun Shao, Ning Li, Liping Zhu, Wenhong Zhang, ,
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04447-y

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, Didrik F. Vestrheim, Torbjørn Bruvik, Ragnhild B. Roness, Martha L. Bjørnstad, Margrethe Greve-Isdahl, Anneke Steens, Ola B. Brynildsrud
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04453-0

Abstract:
We described the population structure of Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) in Norway from 1996 to 2019 and determined if there were evolutionary shifts and whether these correlated with changes in the childhood immunization program. We selected 180 B. pertussis isolates, 22 from the whole cell vaccine (WCV) era (1996–1997) and 158 from the acellular vaccine (ACV) era (1998–2019). We conducted whole genome sequencing and determined the distribution and frequency of allelic variants and temporal changes of ACV genes. Norwegian B. pertussis isolates were evenly distributed across a phylogenetic tree that included global strains. We identified seven different allelic profiles of ACV genes (A–F), in which profiles A1, A2, and B dominated (89%), all having pertussis toxin (ptxA) allele 1, pertussis toxin promoter (ptxP) allele 3, and pertactin (prn) allele 2 present. Isolates with ptxP1 and prn1 were not detected after 2007, whereas the prn2 allele likely emerged prior to 1972, and ptxP3 before the early 1980s. Allele conversions of ACV genes all occurred prior to the introduction of ACV. Sixteen percent of our isolates showed mutations within the prn gene. ACV and its booster doses (implemented for children in 2007 and adolescents in 2013) might have contributed to evolvement of a more uniform B. pertussis population, with recent circulating strains having ptxA1, ptxP3, and prn2 present, and an increasing number of prn mutations. These strains clearly deviate from ACV strains (ptxA1, ptxP1, prn1), and this could have implications for vaccine efficiency and, therefore, prevention and control of pertussis.
, Nalia López, Joan Grifols, Laia Egea, Belén Rivaya, Jun Hao Wang Wang, Jordi Casabona, Pere Joan Cardona
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04450-3

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Correction
Pauline Hilda Herroelen, Robbe Heestermans, Kristof Emmerechts, Kristof Vandoorslaer, Ingrid Wybo, Denis Piérard,
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-1; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04451-2

Vishal Sharma, Anoop Singh, Mohita Gaur, Deepti Rawat, Anjali Yadav, Rajan, Chanchal Kumar, Mandira Varma-Basil, Sheelu Lohiya, Vishal Khanna, et al.
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04449-w

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, Mathias Hetzmannseder, Birgit Willinger, Peter Starzengruber, Claudia Mikula-Pratschke, Andrea Kormann-Klement, Michael Weber, Angelika Berger, Agnes Grill
European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-022-04446-z

Abstract:
Streptococcus pneumoniae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. In certain cases, it can lead to serious invasive infections peaking in very young children and the elderly. Especially young children are frequent carriers and are thus regarded as the reservoir for horizontal transmission of pneumococci. This is the first study evaluating pneumococcal colonization patterns in healthcare professionals working in a tertiary care pediatric hospital, including carriage prevalence, serotype distribution, and risk factors for carriage. One oropharyngeal and one nasal swab per individual were directly plated onto appropriate agar plates and conventional culture was used for bacterial identification. Pneumococcal isolates underwent serotyping using Neufeld’s Quellung reaction with type-specific antisera. Additional nasal and oropharyngeal swabs were taken for qPCR analysis targeting lytA. In total, 437 individuals were enrolled. S. pneumoniae was isolated in 4.8% (21/437) of the study cohort using conventional culture and in 20.1% (88/437) of subjects using qPCR. Independent risk factors for pneumococcal carriage were living in the same household with children under 8 years of age and being aged 36–45 years with a carriage prevalence reaching 11.6% (vs. 2.9%, p = 0.002) and 6.7% (vs. 4.3%, p = 0.029), respectively. The most common serotypes were 6C and 3. A total of 71.4% (15/21) of the detected serotypes are not included in any currently available pneumococcal vaccine; 28.6% (6/21) of the carried serotypes are included in the PCV13 vaccine. We found a relevant amount of pneumococcal carriage bearing the potential risk of horizontal in-hospital transmission.
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