Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology

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ISSN / EISSN : 0013-4694 / 0013-4694
Published by: Elsevier BV (10.1016)
Total articles ≅ 18,513
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Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology/Electromyography and Motor Control, Volume 109, pp 508-514; https://doi.org/10.1016/s1388-2457(98)00007-8

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, L.F. Quesney
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 434-438; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00103-5

Abstract:
Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges have been recognized for 33 years; however, little is known about the underlying mechanism causing periodic discharges. The following case provides an opportunity to study PLEDs in a patient with precisely localized subcortical grey matter lesions. Routine EEGs and overnight polysomnography were performed on the study patient. Standard 10-20 electrode positions were used, as well as EOG and chin EMG for polysomnography. The study patient was a 39-year-old woman with severe left caudate nucleus atrophy and right hemi-dystonia. She had left ventral-lateral (VL) thalamotomies in 1989 and 1991, pallidotomy in 1992, and centromedian thalamic stimulator implantation in 1997. EEGs prior to surgical intervention demonstrated left hemisphere PLEDs during sleep. Following CM nucleus stimulatory implantation, the patient had overnight polsomnography. EEG during wakefulness and REM sleep was normal. With stages I-IV sleep left hemisphere PLEDs at 1-2 Hz were seen with fronto-temporal predominance. Sleep spindles were present bilaterally. There was no history of seizures, before or after surgery. The finding of PLEDs confined to synchronized sleep which were not affected by surgical manipulation of the motor basal ganglia circuit suggests a role of the associative basal ganglia circuit in the generation of periodic phenomenon.
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 462-464; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00127-8

, Mirella Boselli, Maria Cristina Spaggiari, Arianna Smerieri, Mario Giovanni Terzano
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 439-450; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00108-4

Abstract:
Objectives: The present study aimed at offering a standardized database for cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) parameters across representative ages of life.
Rodney J. Croft,
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 387-394; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00086-8

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N. Badinand-Hubert, M. Bureau, E. Hirsch, P. Masnou, L. Nahum, D. Parain,
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 422-427; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00101-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, M. Matoušek
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 415-421; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00090-x

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, Ruth O'Hara, , Mark Mandelkern, Andrew F. Leuchter
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 408-414; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00092-3

Abstract:
Objective: There has been considerable discussion regarding the accuracy of topographic electroencephalographic (EEG) maps for assessing local cerebral function. We performed this study to test the accuracy of EEG mapping by examining the association between electrical activity and the perfusion under each electrode as another measure of local cerebral function.
, Erika Scheidl, Imre Szirmai
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 402-407; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00089-3

Abstract:
We demonstrate clinical data and findings of MRI, transcranial Doppler (TCD), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and electroencephalography (EEG) in an 8 month follow-up study of a 15 year old girl who developed focal status epilepticus with sensory and visual illusions. EEG showed right temporal and occipital seizure activity and attenuation of the alpha activity with right predominance. MRI showed a right temporo-parietal hyper signal on the T2 weighted images involving the cortex with sulcal effacement. MRI-angiography suggested insufficient flow in the right transverse sinus. TCD detected an elevated flow velocity in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery during status epilepticus, corresponding to an increased perfusion of the epileptic area revealed by SPECT. After normalization of the TCD finding, the MRI detected persistent cortical abnormality beyond the 70th day after admission. MRI normalized on the 103rd day of follow-up. Serial EEG frequency analysis demonstrated the recovery of alpha peak frequency on the left side, but the attenuation of rhythmic signals remained persistent on the right. In our case, the restitution of postictal EEG lag behind the consolidation of MRI signal abnormality.
Rodney J Croft,
Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology, Volume 107, pp 395-401; https://doi.org/10.1016/s0013-4694(98)00087-x

Abstract:
Objective: In the field of EOG correction, discrepancies have been found between the propagation rates for different types and frequencies of eye movement. However, Croft and Barry demonstrated that these differences can be explained by the affect of EOG magnitude on the correction procedure (Croft, R.J. and Barry, R.J. EOG correction: a new perspective. Electroenceph. clin. Neurophysiol., 1998, 107: 387–394). This study utilized a new `aligned-artifact average' technique (AAA) to examine whether propagation is constant across eye movement types and frequencies, and tested the AAA as an EOG correction tool.
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