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EISSN : 2673-6357
Published by: MDPI AG (10.3390)
Total articles ≅ 34
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Published: 26 July 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 477-495; doi:10.3390/hemato2030030

Abstract:
Ineffective hematopoiesis is the major characteristic of early myelodysplastic syndromes. Its pathophysiology relies on a diversity of mechanisms supported by genetic events that develop in aging hematopoietic stem cells. Deletion and mutations trigger epigenetic modifications, and co-transcriptional and post-transcriptional deregulations of gene expression. Epistatic interactions between mutants may aggravate the phenotype. Amplification of minor subclones containing mutations that promote their growth and suppress the others drives the clonal evolution. Aging also participates in reprogramming the immune microenvironment towards an inflammatory state, which precedes the expansion of immunosuppressive cells such as Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressive cells that alters the anti-tumor response of effector cells. Integrating biomarkers of transcription/translation deregulation and immune contexture will help the design of personalized treatments.
Published: 20 July 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 463-476; doi:10.3390/hemato2030029

Abstract:
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with a variety of clinical manifestations related to viral tissue damage, as well as a virally induced immune response. Hyperstimulation of the immune system can serve as a trigger for autoimmunity. Several immune-mediated manifestations have been described in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are the most common hematologic autoimmune disorders seen in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Vaccine-induced thrombocytopenia is a unique autoimmune hematologic cytopenia associated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. This paper will review the current literature on the association of SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination with autoimmune cytopenias and the clinical course of autoimmune cytopenias in patients with COVID-19.
Published: 18 July 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 441-462; doi:10.3390/hemato2030028

Abstract:
In this paper, we explore the application of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for the treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL) by means of in silico experimentation, mathematical modelling through first-order Ordinary Differential Equations and nonlinear systems theory. By combining the latter with systems biology on cancer evolution we were able to establish a sufficient condition on the therapy dose to ensure complete response. The latter is illustrated across multiple numerical simulations when comparing three mathematically formulated administration protocols with one of a phase 1 dose-escalation trial on CAR-T cells for the treatment of ALL on children and young adults. Therefore, both our analytical and in silico results are consistent with real-life scenarios. Finally, our research indicates that tumour cells growth rate and the killing efficacy of the therapy are key factors in the designing of personalised strategies for cancer treatment.
Published: 13 July 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 429-440; doi:10.3390/hemato2030027

Abstract:
We reviewed our studies on epidemiology and germline genetics of amyloidosis. In epidemiology, we considered both hereditary and non-hereditary amyloidosis. As the source of data, we used the nationwide Swedish hospital discharge register. We estimated the incidence of hereditary ATTR amyloidosis, for which Sweden is a global endemic area, at 2/million. Surprisingly, the disease was also endemic within Sweden; the incidence in the province with the highest incidence was 100 times higher than in the rest of Sweden. Risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma increased five-fold in the affected individuals. Among non-hereditary amyloidosis, the incidence for AL amyloidosis (abbreviated as AL) was estimated at 3.2/million, with a median survival time of 3 years. Secondary systemic amyloidosis (most likely AA amyloidosis) showed an incidence of 1.15/million for combined sexes. The female rate was two times higher than the male rate, probably relating to the higher female prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis. The median survival time was 4 years. We also identified patients who likely had familial autoinflammatory disease, characterized by early onset and immigrant background from the Eastern Mediterranean area. Young Syrian descendants had the highest incidence rate, which was over 500 times higher than that in individuals with Swedish parents. Germline genetics focused on AL on which we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in three AL cohorts (N = 1129) from Germany, UK, and Italy. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 10 loci showed evidence of an association at p< 10−5; some of these were previously documented to influence multiple myeloma (MM) risk, including the SNP at the IRF4 binding site. In AL, SNP rs9344 at the splice site of cyclin D1, influencing translocation (11;14), reached the highest significance, p = 7.80 × 10−11; the SNP was only marginally significant in MM. The locus close to gene SMARCD3, involved in chromatin remodeling, was also significant. These data provide evidence for common genetic susceptibility to AL and MM. We continued by analyzing genetic associations in nine clinical profiles, characterized by organ involvement or Ig profiles. The light chain only (LCO) profile associated with the SNP at the splice site of cyclin D1 with p = 1.99 × 10−12. Even for the other profiles, distinct genetic associations were found. It was concluded that the strong association of rs9344 with LCO and t(11;14) amyloidosis offer attractive mechanistic clues to AL causation. Mendelian randomization analysis identified associations of AL with increased blood monocyte counts and the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 17 (TNFRSF17 alias BCMA) gene. Two other associations with the TNFRSF members were found. We discuss the corollaries of the findings with the recent success of treating t(11;14) AL with a novel drug venetoclax, and the application of BCMA as the common target of plasma cell immunotherapies.
Published: 1 July 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 403-428; doi:10.3390/hemato2030026

Abstract:
Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) was named 50 years ago to describe a myeloid malignancy whose onset is typically insidious. This disease is now classified by the World Health Organisation as a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) overlap disease. Observed mostly in ageing people, CMML is characterized by the expansion of monocytes and, in many cases, granulocytes. Abnormal repartition of circulating monocyte subsets, as identified by flow cytometry, facilitates disease recognition. CMML is driven by the accumulation, in the stem cell compartment, of somatic variants in epigenetic, splicing and signaling genes, leading to epigenetic reprogramming. Mature cells of the leukemic clone contribute to creating an inflammatory climate through the release of cytokines and chemokines. The suspected role of the bone marrow niche in driving CMML emergence and progression remains to be deciphered. The clinical expression of the disease is highly diverse. Time-dependent accumulation of symptoms eventually leads to patient death as a consequence of physical exhaustion, multiple cytopenias and acute leukemia transformation. Fifty years after its identification, CMML remains one of the most severe chronic myeloid malignancies, without disease-modifying therapy. The proliferative component of the disease that distinguishes CMML from severe MDS has been mostly neglected. This review summarizes the progresses made in disease understanding since its recognition and argues for more CMML-dedicated clinical trials.
Published: 30 June 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 392-402; doi:10.3390/hemato2030025

Abstract:
Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) are potentially facing diminished life expectancy and decreased quality of life, due to thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications, progression to myelofibrosis or acute leukemia with ensuing signs of hematopoietic insufficiency, and disturbing symptoms such as pruritus, night sweats, and bone pain. In patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or polycythemia vera (PV), current guidelines recommend both primary and secondary measures to prevent thrombosis. These include acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for patients with intermediate- or high-risk ET and all patients with PV, unless they have contraindications for ASA use, and phlebotomy for all PV patients. A target hematocrit level below 45% is demonstrated to be associated with decreased cardiovascular events in PV. In addition, cytoreductive therapy is shown to reduce the rate of thrombotic complications in high-risk ET and high-risk PV patients. In patients with prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (pre-PMF), similar measures are recommended as in those with ET. Patients with overt PMF may be at increased risk of bleeding and thus require a more individualized approach to thrombosis prevention. This review summarizes the thrombotic risk factors and primary and secondary preventive measures against thrombosis in MPN.
Published: 20 June 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 383-391; doi:10.3390/hemato2020024

Abstract:
Our aim was to investigate the usefulness of 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in the diagnosis, treatment response evaluation, and follow-up of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)-associated multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD). Fifteen patients with histologically diagnosis of HHV-8-associated MCD were retrospectively included. For all patients, a 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed before any treatment for diagnosis and PET/CT scans after Rituximab (4 cycles) for the evaluation of treatment response; moreover, 22 PET/CT were performed during the follow-up to check disease status. To evaluate treatment response, we applied Deauville criteria. PET/CT findings were compared with other conventional imaging (CI) findings. At diagnosis, 18F-FDG PET/CT showed an increased FDG-uptake in all cases corresponding to lymph nodes and confirming the MCD. The average SUVmax of the FDG avid lesions were 8.75, average lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio was 3.6, and average lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio was 3.9. After first-line therapy, 18F-FDG PET/CT resulted negative (Deauville score < 4) in seven patients and positive in the remaining eight (Deauville score 4–5). A negative restaging PET/CT was associated with a lower risk of relapse. During follow-up, PET/CT detected the presence of relapse or progression in 5 (23%) cases with an accuracy higher than CI. 18F-FDG PET/CT seems to be an useful tool in studying HHV-8-associated MCD both at diagnosis and during follow-up.
Published: 7 June 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 368-382; doi:10.3390/hemato2020023

Abstract:
The clinical and biological significance of programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression by B-lymphoma cells is largely unknown. Here, using multicolor immunofluorescent staining (MC-IF), we investigated PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in PAX5+ (B-lymphoma), CD68+ (macrophage), or CD3+ (T-cell) cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 32 consecutive patients with de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab plus chemotherapy. PD-1- and PD-L1-expressing PAX5+ cells were observed in 59% and 3% of the patients, respectively. PD-1-expressing CD3+ lymphocytes and PD-L1-expressing CD68+ macrophages were observed in 89% and 86% of the patients, respectively. PD-L1 expression on PAX5+ lymphoma cells or CD68+ macrophages and PD-1 expression on CD3+ lymphocytes were not correlated with prognosis. However, patients with PD-1 expression on lymphoma cells showed shorter progression-free survival than those lacking PD-1-expressing lymphoma cells (p = 0.033). Furthermore, genetically modified PD-1-knockout human B-lymphoma VAL cells showed reduced cell growth and migration, and decreased S6 kinase phosphorylation than VAL/mock cells. Our data suggest that PD-1 expression on DLBCL cells detected by MC-IF was associated with poor prognosis and cell-intrinsic PD-1 signaling was related with cell growth and migration in a subpopulation of B-cell lymphoma. These findings may allow the development of distinct DLBCL subtypes affecting prognosis.
Published: 4 June 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 358-367; doi:10.3390/hemato2020022

Abstract:
Parents’ attitudes and practices may support the children’s reactions to treatments for leukaemia and their general adjustment. This study has two aims: to explore parenting depending on the child’s age and to develop and test a model on how family processes influence the psycho-social development of children with leukaemia. Patients were 118 leukemic children and their parents recruited at the Haematology–Oncologic Clinic of the Department of Paediatrics, University of Padua. All parents were Caucasian with a mean age of 37.39 years (SD = 6.03). Children’s mean age was 5.89 years (SD = 4.21). After the signature of the informed consent, the parents were interviewed using the EFI-C from which we derived Parenting dimension and three parental perceptions on the child’s factors. One year later, the clinical psychologist interviewed again parents using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). The analyses revealed the presence of a significant difference in parenting by the child’s age: Infants required a higher and more intensive parenting. The child’s coping with medical procedures at the second week after the diagnosis, controlled for parenting effect, impacted upon the child’s adaptation one-year post diagnosis. Specific intervention programmes are proposed in order to help children more at risk just after the diagnosis of developmental delays.
Published: 1 June 2021
by MDPI
Hemato, Volume 2, pp 353-357; doi:10.3390/hemato2020021

Abstract:
Extranodal involvement of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has been reported in 20–40% of patients and has been typically observed in the skin, bones, gastrointestinal tract, liver and brain. Cardiac involvement has been reported in up to 20% of autopsy cases of patients with NHL and accounts for about 2% of all cardiac malignancies. Here, we report a peculiar case of a secondary cardiac diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), occurring with an abrupt hemodynamic instability, characterized by a sudden ventricular tachycardia and cardiogenic shock. The patient promptly started the first cycle of chemotherapy and was admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) of our institution to prevent potential cardiovascular complications during treatment. We applied a fractionated treatment approach, progressively reaching standard doses, to decrease the risk of early death and ensure a successful management.
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