African Diaspora

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1872-5457 / 1872-5465
Published by: Brill Academic Publishers (10.1163)
Total articles ≅ 131
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ESCI
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Latest articles in this journal

Fortunat Miarintsoa Andrianimanana,
Published: 4 November 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10018

Abstract:
This article analyses the political blogging of the Malagasy diaspora as part of their transnational political participation. It focuses on three aspects of the blogs: the most frequent topics addressed, how are the topics addressed, and the political bloggers. To do this, a Thematic Content Analysis based on four categories (‘soapboxes’, ‘transmission belts’, ‘conversation starters’ and ‘mobilisers’) of four of their most active and influential political blogs was conducted. The analysis revealed that (i) the blogs are mostly “soapboxes” that consist of commenting the political issues in Madagascar, (ii) their contents were mostly focused on the coup d’ état in 2009, and (iii) the bloggers are involved in direct political participation in parallel offline. This paper shows the role of the studied blogs as tribunes of opinions that gather a partisan audience discussing the Malagasy political issues, and as judgment tools contributing to the braking or fuelling of Madagascar’s international relations.
Published: 4 November 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-24; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10019

Abstract:
Liberia is a state built on a history of migration. From the transatlantic slave trade to its contemporary generation of transnational citizens, images of elsewhere have always informed this West African country’s local and national discussions of integration and exclusion. This paper shows how historical imaginations and representations of ‘here’ and ‘there’, of ‘suffering’ and ‘escape’, inform contemporary discourses of belonging in Liberia. I argue that the imagination of civilisation – kwii – and distinction plays an important role in the ways distance and mobility are perceived and articulated, both from a physical point of view and a moral-social point of view, at transnational and local levels. Rather than being merely tied to a national elite, the imagination of mobility is, I demonstrate, linked to an ethos of suffering articulated at all levels of society, informed by the experience of structural violence and crises over time.
, Edmond Akwasi Agyeman
Published: 4 November 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10016

Abstract:
This paper interrogates an unexamined component of the religion-migration nexus in Ghana. Using African Traditional Religion as a case in point, the paper examines the function shrines play in sustaining youth migration to Libya and across the Mediterranean to Europe. The paper relies on interviews and fieldtrips to migrant sending communities in the Nkoranza area of the Bono East region of central Ghana. The paper gives an account of the daily realities of prospective migrants, returnees and their families. Among other key findings, it is shown that there is an intricate connection between youth migration, the family system and the deities in sustaining the trans-Saharan migration. This migration, we observe, has become a livelihood strategy, the perpetuation of which reassures the survival of not only the people, but their gods as well.
Published: 4 November 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10017

Abstract:
Amongst young people in Freetown, ‘Temple Run’, a mobile phone game that requires the player to run for their life across treacherous obstacles, is used as code for the perilous journey that an increasing number of young Sierra Leoneans made to Europe via Libya. Through ethnographic accounts, the article discusses the role of dreams of migration in Freetown youths’ articulations of a distinctive political imagination through which they at once critique and re-imagine their relation to the state and assert their identity and expectations as Sierra Leonean citizens. These narratives are rooted in everyday experiences of neglect and state violence but also embody a long history in the region of intersections between migration, insecurity, and contestations of power. Exploring migration as discourse, separate from practice, the paper shows how migration imageries become incorporated into expressions of presence rather than simply longings for absence and into normative ideas of citizenship.
Published: 4 November 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10015

Abstract:
This article analyses the ways in which young people with a migration background develop their own transnational engagement with their or their parents’ country of origin. Drawing on 17-months of multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in the Netherlands and Ghana, we add to the emerging literature on ‘return’ mobilities by analysing young people of Ghanaian background, irrespective of whether they or their parents migrated, and by looking at an under-researched form of mobility that they engage in: that of attending funerals in Ghana. Funerals occupy a central role in Ghanaian society, and thus allow young people to gain knowledge about cultural practices, both by observing and embodying them, and develop their relationships with people in Ghana. Rather than reproducing their parents’ transnational attachments, young people recreate these according to their own needs, which involves dealing with tensions. Peer relationships—which have largely gone unnoticed in transnational migration studies—play a significant role in this process.
Michael McEachrane
Published: 28 June 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-23; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10014

Abstract:
The article argues that there are three senses of the term African diaspora – a continental, a cultural and a racial sense – which need to be distinguished from each other when conceptualising Black African diasporas in Europe. Although African Diaspora Studies is occupied with African diasporas in a racial sense, usually it has conceptualised these in terms of racial and cultural identities. This is also true of the past decades of African Diaspora Studies on Europe. This article makes an argument for a socio-political conceptualisation of Black African diasporas in Europe that includes, but goes beyond, matters of identity and culture.
Célia Lamblin
Published: 4 March 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10012

Abstract:
In Egypt, the economic costs incurred by spouses to pay for a marriage are huge, going far beyond the parties’ regular income. Migration often appears to be the only possible way to amass the capital required to pay the expenses associated with their establishment as a couple and to support the household. This article is based on data collected in the course of several ethnographic surveys carried out between 2014 and 2017 in a village in the Nile Delta, and deals with the issue of establishing a family in the context of migration for men who have left for France, and for women who remain in the village. It presents the marriage of migrants in the village as an instrument which both guarantees the homecoming of the men who have emigrated and enables the upward social mobility of women without however challenging the patriarchal organisation of Egyptian society.
Célia Lamblin
Published: 4 March 2021
African Diaspora, Volume -1, pp 1-26; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10013

Abstract:
Résumé En Égypte, les coûts économiques engagés par les futurs époux pour le paiement du mariage sont colossaux, dépassant largement les revenus réguliers des contractants. La migration apparaît souvent comme une voie possible pour accumuler les capitaux économiques nécessaires au paiement des frais consécutifs à la mise en couple et à l’ entretien du ménage. Cet article s’ appuie sur des données récoltées lors de plusieurs enquêtes ethnographiques réalisées entre 2014 et 2017 dans un village du Delta du Nil. Cette contribution aborde la question du « faire famille » en situation migratoire pour des hommes partis en France, mais également pour des femmes restées au village. Elle présente le mariage des migrants au village comme un instrument qui assure à la fois le retour des hommes émigrés et permet l’ ascension sociale des femmes sans pour autant remettre en cause l’ organisation patriarcale de la société égyptienne.
Karel Arnaut, Jack Boulton
Published: 13 November 2020
African Diaspora, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-01201003

Reginold A. Royston
Published: 28 June 2020
African Diaspora, Volume 12, pp 11-37; https://doi.org/10.1163/18725465-bja10008

Abstract:
Digital media, diaspora and deterritorialisation have provided important ways to think about contemporary global flows and social ties. Digital diasporas as a unit of study have become especially relevant for social scientists, particularly anthropologists: In this paper, the author argues that digital diasporas represent both online communities and the ICT practices of those living abroad, which seemingly actualise the potential inherent in Castell’s notion of the Network Society. Examining the material and social dimensions of these ties, however, this paper moves to critique the notion of networks as stabilised representations of diaspora/homeland connections. Drawing from the author’s ethnographic research with tech professionals in Ghana, and with diaspora-based social media users in the U.S. and the Netherlands, the analysis posits that the asymmetry of Africa’s sociotechnical infrastructures is central to understanding the enduring disjunctive nature of these flows. Through interviews and analysis, the author illustrates how these sociotechnical systems configure Ghana’s global cyberculture.
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