Advanced Healthcare Materials

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ISSN / EISSN : 2192-2640 / 2192-2659
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1002)
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Total articles ≅ 3,573
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Published: 4 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100125

Abstract:
The protein corona can significantly modulate the physicochemical properties and gene delivery of polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA complexes (polyplexes). The effects of the protein corona on the transfection have been well studied in terms of averaged gene expression in a whole cell population. Such evaluation methods give excellent and reliable statistics, but they in general provide the final transfection efficiency without reflecting the dynamic process of gene expression. In this regard the influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the gene expression of PEI polyplexes also on a single cell level via live imaging is analyzed. The results reveal that although the BSA corona causes difference in the overall gene expression and mRNA transcription, the gene expression behavior on the level of individual cell is similar, including the mitosis-dependent expression, distributions of onset time, expression pattern in two daughter cells, and expression kinetics in successfully transfected cells. Comparison of single cell and ensemble data on whole cell cultures indicate that the protein corona does not alter the transfection process after nuclear entry, including cell division, polyplex dissociation, and protein expression. Its influence on other steps of in vitro gene delivery before nuclear entry shall render the difference in the overall transfection.
, Davide Maria Donati, Peter Choong, Enrico Lucarelli, Gordon Wallace
Published: 4 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100041

Abstract:
The inability to replace human muscle in surgical practice is a significant challenge. An artificial muscle controlled by the nervous system is considered a potential solution for this. Here, this is defined as a neuromuscular prosthesis. Muscle loss and dysfunction related to musculoskeletal oncological impairments, neuromuscular diseases, trauma or spinal cord injuries can be treated through artificial muscle implantation. At present, the use of dielectric elastomer actuators working as capacitors appears a promising option. Acrylic or silicone elastomers with carbon nanotubes functioning as the electrode achieve mechanical performances similar to human muscle in vitro. However, mechanical, electrical, and biological issues have prevented clinical application to date. Here materials and mechatronic solutions are presented which can tackle current clinical problems associated with implanting an artificial muscle controlled by the nervous system. Progress depends on the improvement of the actuation properties of the elastomer, seamless or wireless integration between the nervous system and the artificial muscle, and on reducing the foreign body response. It is believed that by combining the mechanical, electrical, and biological solutions proposed here, an artificial neuromuscular prosthesis may be a reality in surgical practice in the near future.
Luyao Shen, Pengfei Wang,
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202002205

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Irene C. Jenkins, Joshua J. Milligan,
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100209

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Neta Shimony, Alona Shagan, Bat‐Hen Eylon, Abraham Nyska, Adi Gross,
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100803

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Xinyu Sun, Lihua Li, Hui Zhang, Mengna Dong, Jiao Wang, Pei Jia, Tong Bu, Xin Wang,
Published: 3 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100546

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Jeong‐Kee Yoon, Jaehoon Kim, Zachary Shah, Ashi Awasthi, Advay Mahajan,
Published: 2 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202002285

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Runxiao Zheng, , Fan Qi, Yunyun Wu, Xiaoqing Han, Jiao Yan,
Published: 2 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100412

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Yi Wang, Avani V. Pisapati, X. Frank Zhang,
Published: 2 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202002196

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kathleen Marulanda, Alexandra Mercel, David C. Gillis, Kui Sun, Maria Gambarian, Joshua Roark, Jenna Weiss, , , S. Ruben Centeno, et al.
Published: 1 June 2021
by Wiley
Advanced Healthcare Materials; doi:10.1002/adhm.202100302

Abstract:
Pulmonary hypertension is a highly morbid disease with no cure. Available treatments are limited by systemic adverse effects due to non-specific biodistribution. Self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers are biocompatible nanomaterials that can be modified to recognize specific biological markers to provide targeted drug delivery and reduce off-target toxicity. Here, PA nanofibers that target the angiotensin I-converting enzyme and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) are developed, as both proteins are overexpressed in the lung with pulmonary hypertension. It is demonstrated that intravenous delivery of RAGE-targeted nanofibers containing the targeting epitope LVFFAED (LVFF) significantly accumulated within the lung in a chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension mouse model. Using 3D light sheet fluorescence microscopy, it is shown that LVFF nanofiber localization is specific to the diseased pulmonary tissue with immunofluorescence analysis demonstrating colocalization of the targeted nanofiber to RAGE in the hypoxic lung. Furthermore, biodistribution studies show that significantly more LVFF nanofibers localized to the lung compared to major off-target organs. Targeted nanofibers are retained within the pulmonary tissue for 24 h after injection. Collectively, these data demonstrate the potential of a RAGE-targeted nanomaterial as a drug delivery platform to treat pulmonary hypertension.
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