Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2325-7776 / 2325-7792
Current Publisher: Scientific Research Publishing, Inc. (10.4236)
Former Publisher: Scientific Research Publishing, Inc. (10.4236)
Total articles ≅ 76
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Mathieu Hill, James L. Cox
Published: 1 January 2021
CellBio, Volume 10, pp 1-9; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2021.101001

Abstract:
Background: Metastasis is a major problem for effective therapy of cancer. Small cysteine protease inhibitors, cystatins have been shown to be anti-metastatic for a number of different cancers. We have identified a small peptide of cystatin which exhibits anti-cancer properties for B16 melanoma cells in vitro. Methods: B16 melanoma cells were measured for growth, proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in the presence and absence of cystatin peptide. Results: The cystatin peptide reduced melanoma cell growth, proliferation, migration, and increased apoptosis in melanoma cells in culture. Conclusion: Cystatin peptide exhibits anti-cancer effects on highly metastatic B16 melanoma cells in culture.
Henriette Poaty, Franck Arnaud Moukobolo Kinsangou, Alexis F. Bolenga Liboko, Judith Nsonde Malanda, Michel Geffard
Published: 1 January 2021
CellBio, Volume 10, pp 11-21; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2021.102002

Abstract:
Background: Many literature reviews report vitamin E supplementation as a benefit chemopreventive and adjuvant therapy in breast and prostate cancers. We investigated in the present work, alpha-tocopherol (α-T) expression (the current active form of vitamin E) from tissues of Congolese patients neither smokers nor alcohol drinkers and without intake antioxidant vitamins supplement. Methods: α-T was analysed in one normal placenta of nine weeks of gestation and in nineteen cancerous tissues, including seven breast cancers, six prostate cancers, and six gestational choriocarcinomas. The study was performed by immunohistochemistry method after diagnosis confirmation by histological analysis. Results: α-T staining in membrane cells and collagen fibers presented a moderate expression in healthy sections of tissues (positive control), but the labelling was strong in breast, prostate adenocarcinomas, and in choriocarcinomas. Conclusion: Tumors immunohistochemistry of α-tocopherol in breast, prostate cancers and in choriocarcinoma show elevated immunostaining suggesting a probable oncogenic effect of the micronutrient.
Swati Sharma, Gurudutta U. Gangenahalli, Upma Singh
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 123-141; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.93007

Abstract:
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are tissue-specific cells giving rise to all mature blood cell types regulated by a diverse group of hematopoietic cytokines and growth factors that influences the survival & proliferation of early progenitors and differentiation mechanisms by modulating the functional activities of HSCs. In this study, the functional yet distinctive role of three novel combinations of gene pairs RRAGC & PSMC2; CKAP4 & MANF; and CTR9 & CNTNAP2 have been newly identified. These novel combinations of genes were confirmed and expressed in K562 human leukemic cell line in the presence of cytokine combination (IL-3, FLT-3 and SCF) using RT-PCR and siRNA-mediated gene knock down strategy. This study signifies the synergistic role of gene pairs in different molecular activities like ubiquitination or proteasomal degradation, calcium mobilization, dopamine signaling.
Gamarra Manrique Renzo Reynaldo
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 100-108; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.92005

Abstract:
The expression of cancer is similar to processes that in unicellular organisms grant convenient properties, such as immortality. The presence of oncogenes and proteins in viruses, protozoa and invertebrates is recognized. The study of these characters, at each biological level, represents the way to establish phylogenetic relationships. In unicellular and colonial organisms these characters provide the courage to face a threat. In humans they are inactive and return to express themselves only if there is potential chronic damage. Then they modulate other genes that will respond to the cellular aggressor, leading to unicellular immortality (cancer). It is relevant to evaluate the final or teleological origin of the cancer, which is not currently known. This review provides a theory that would explain why a normal cell becomes neoplastic. Molecular Phylogeny is the final teleological mechanism, whereby transformed cells recapitulate the expression of genes and their products, through molecular maneuvers that assist in responding to adverse factors, referred to as epidemiological levels as risk factors. Self-replication remains the first objective of life on earth. The teleological cause of cancer encompasses this phylogenetic mechanism of damage response. Therefore, I conclude that the final origin of cancer may be a biological adaptation mechanism, called molecular phylogeny. If this theory is verified, it could fill the gap that currently persists on the teleological origin of cancer.
Mahmoud Saad Mohamed El-Khodary
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 1-13; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.91001

Abstract:
Cell fleeing from death phenomenon occurs as either complete or incomplete; the phenomenon is incomplete fleeing from death when cell blocks intrinsic death program only. But, it becomes complete fleeing from death if the cell successfully blocks the pathway of intrinsic and extrinsic programs of cell death. This phenomenon is induced by the formation of hydrogen peroxide which activates nuclear factor kappa B. The nuclear factor-kappa B stimulates the expression of several genes, to produces 6 factors (BcL-2, Muc-1, MMPs, DcR3, Muc-4, muc-16, and TNF-α). Such factors act as blockers of the pathway of intrinsic and extrinsic programs of cell death. These blockers convert normal cell to a cancer cell. If these blockers are removed, the death programs of cancer cells will run again and cancer will disappear.
Kohei Miyazaki, Yuichi Ichikawa, Noriko Saitoh, Hisato Saitoh
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 14-28; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.91002

Abstract:
While micronuclei (MN) store extranuclear DNA and cause genome instability, the effects of nuclear envelope (NE) assembly defects associated with MN on genome instability remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the NE protein distribution in MN using HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Under the standard condition and two pharmacological culture conditions, we found that three types of NE protein assemblies were associated with MN: 1) intact NE assembly, in which both core and non-core NE proteins were evenly present; 2) type I assembly, in which only core NE proteins were detectable; and 3) type II assembly in which a region deficient for both core and non-core NE proteins existed and a pattern recognition receptor, cyclic guanosine monophos-phate-adenosine monophosphate synthase, was frequently detected. Our findings provide experimental settings and a method of grouping MN-associated NE defects, which may be helpful for researchers who are interested in regulation of genome and nuclear organization relevant to cancer development.
Mahmoud Saad Mohamed Elkhodary
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 109-121; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.92006

Abstract:
Heavy infection of the virus leads to overproduction of cytokines. The overproduction of cytokine (cytokines storms) is responsible for the critical cases and deaths of COVID-19. The nuclear factor kappa-B stimulates the expression of the genes, which is responsible for cytokines storm and RNA transcription. The COVID-19 virus can be controlled by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-B. Nuclear factor kappa-B is controlled by inhibition of hydrogen peroxide and inhibitor kappa-B kinase enzyme.
Qinglin Dong, Xiangying Xing, Yang Han, Xiaolin Wei, Shuo Zhang
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 29-84; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.91003

Abstract:
It is believed that eukaryotes arise from prokaryotes, which means that organelles can form de novo in prokaryotes. Such events, however, had not been observed previously. Here, we report the biogenesis of orga-nelles in the endosymbiotic cyanobacterium TDX16 (prokaryote) that was released from its senescent/necrotic host cell of green alga Haema-tococcus pluvialis (eukaryote). Microscopic observations showed that organelle biogenesis in TDX16 initiated with cytoplasm compartmental-ization, followed by de-compartmentalization, DNA allocation, and re-compartmentalization, as such two composite organelles-the primi-tive chloroplast and primitive nucleus sequestering minor and major fractions of cellular DNA respectively were formed. Thereafter, the eu-karyotic cytoplasmic matrix was built up from the matrix extruded from the primitive nucleus; mitochondria were assembled in and segregated from the primitive chloroplast, whereby the primitive nucleus and primi-tive chloroplast matured into the nucleus and chloroplast respectively. While mitochondria subsequently turned into double-membraned vacu-oles after matrix degradation. Results of pigment analyses, 16S rRNA and genome sequencing revealed that TDX16 is a phycocyanin-containing cyanobacterium resembling Chroococcidiopsis thermalis, which had ac-quired 9,017,401 bp DNAs with 10,301 genes from its host. Accordingly, we conclude that organelle biogenesis in TDX16 is achieved by hybridiz-ing the acquired eukaryotic DNAs with its own one and expressing the hybrid genome. The formation of organelles in cyanobacterium TDX16 is the first case of organelle biogenesis in prokaryotes observed so far, which sheds an unprecedented light on eukaryotes and their connections with prokaryotes, and thus has broad implications on biology.
Fangfang He, Huize Chen, Rong Han
Published: 1 January 2020
CellBio, Volume 9, pp 85-99; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2020.92004

Abstract:
Cytoskeleton exists in all eukaryotes and is involved in many significant cytobiological processes, especially the movements and developmental changes of plant cells. The cytoskeleton consists of microtubule (MT), microfilament (MF), and intermediate filament (IF). MT and MF are vital components of plant cytoskeleton. Crosslinking factor acts as a bridge between MF and MT. They play an important role in cellular life process and have always been a hot topic and key point in plant cytobiology, and the IF is a difficult point in this field. In this paper, the latest research on the cytoskeleton of plants is introduced, which focuses on the structure and dynamics of MT, MF, and IF, and summarizes the crosslinking factors between MT and MF. Also, the paper prospects the future research direction of plant cytoskeleton and the possible research hotspot, which provides a certain reference for people to continue to explore the function of plant cytoskeleton in the future.
Eun Jeoung Lee, Sung Hwa Shin, Sang Sun Kang
Published: 1 January 2019
CellBio, Volume 8, pp 1-16; doi:10.4236/cellbio.2019.81001

Abstract:
Tip60 is a specific member of MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of nuclear histone acetyltransferases (HAT). It is essential for cellular survival, differentiation, and metabolism. A putative canonical NLS motif between the chromo domain and the zinc finger of Tip60 was identified. Here we show evidence that Tip60 is associated with importin α as its substrate and transported from cytoplasm to the nucleus. Pull down assay revealed that Tip60 was physically associated with importin α both in vivo and in vitro. Confocal microscopic observation showed that Tip60 and importin α were co-localized with each other. The localization of Tip60 to the nuclear and its interaction with importin α was disrupted when its putative NLS motif for binding to importin α was mutated (219RKRK222 → 219AAAA222). However, attachment of this putative NLS motif to a cytoplasmic protein (YAP 1-210 fragment) promoted its nuclear localization. Based on transient transfection, Tip60 NLS motif mutant showed a substantial reduction in self-acetylation, HAT activity, and apoptotic ability whereas wild type Tip60 did not show such reduction. Taken together, our results demonstrate that importin α transports Tip60 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus through binding to the putative NLS motif of Tip60 for its tumor suppressing function.
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