AFRYKA

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1234-0278 / 2449-822X
Published by: University of Warsaw (10.32690)
Total articles ≅ 6
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Articles in this journal

Izabela Cywa
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 65-80; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.3

Abstract:
The Siriri Military Group as an Example of Rebel Activities in the CAR Most military incidents in the Central African Republic that have been recorded since 2017 stem from confl icts over transportation trails, cattle (buffalo) grazing and mineral mines (gold and diamonds). The article aims to show the activities of military groups on the territories controlled by them through an analysis of tactics deployed by one of the rebel organisations. The activities of the Siriri group are typical of separatist groups in the Central African Republic (CAR).
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 99-116; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.5

Abstract:
The Socio-Cultural Context of Greetings in Swahili1 Today most linguists agree that language and culture are tightly connected. It is also argued that in order to communicate successfully, we need to achieve a level of socio-cultural competence along with an ability to use the grammar and the lexicon of a particular language. There are many kinds of cultural norms and values that one has to obey, as there may be fundamental communication and discourse differences between one language and another. This paper is primarily concerned with some issues of discourse strategies and pragmatics of African languages. While the study focuses on greeting practices among the Swahili, it also investigates how learners acquire the pragmatics of Swahili greetings in a foreign language context, and how Swahili, as a language of wider communication, is infl uenced by cultural norms and values of its speakers, for whom Swahili is not a primary language.
Ryszard Vorbrich
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 11-37; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.1

Abstract:
Searching for the “Authentic” African The concept of the “true”, authentic African, as a person fundamentally different from Western people, had been long present in European academic discourse (especially in anthropology), as well as popular culture. Its antithesis emerged as a concept of the detribalised African, largely deprived of the traits of the authentic African culture and adopting European cultural patterns. The concept of an “authentic” African as a static “specimen” sourced from old Africa, resistant to cultural change, was rejected by the new, educated African elites. In postcolonial Africa, one of their responses was the idea of Afrocentrism. The article is an essay, not aimed at an exhaustive analysis of the subject. It is rather intended to indicate selected areas of discourse, as well as to show how the concept of an “authentic” African functioned within the academic discourse, as well as how, depending on the context and colonial doctrines, the phenomenon of the interpenetration of cultures and the empowerment of Africans evolved.
Renata Díaz-Szmidt
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 81-98; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.4

Abstract:
Wounded Memory and Historical Trauma in the Literature of Equatorial Guinea. Donato Ndongo Bidyogo’s Works The article, based on the example of Donato Ndongo Bidyogo’s works, presents two aspects of Equatorial Guinean literature, namely memory and trauma. They are crucial for the understanding of this still young literature, written in Spanish. The consideration of selected issues developed by contemporary Equatoguinean writers gives the country’s literature a specifi c character. A refl ection on the dramatic past and the diffi cult present is its recurring motif. The article is divided into four parts. The fi rst part presents a theoretical refl ection on the concept of Paul Ricouer’s “wounded memory” used in the text. The second analyses the so-called traumatic discourse in literature, and attempts to fi nd the distinction between a traumatic event and a traumatising experience. The third part of the article presents the issues of Equatoguinean historical traumas and sketches the literary landscape of the country. The article focuses on literary strategies of collective projection, wounded memory of Equatorial Guineans and the issue of the (im)possibility of mapping trauma in literature. The last part of the text presents literary examples of the phenomena discussed in the literature of Donato Ndongo Bidyogo.
Marek Pawełczak
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 117-138; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.6

Abstract:
How Many Pounds per Fārsala? Measures and Weights used in Zanzibar Trade in the Period 1830–1888 The article concerns the system of measures and weights used in the Sultanate of Zanzibar, mainly in the international port of Zanzibar in the years 1830-1888. The system was used in the trade between local, Arab, Indian and Western merchants. It drew from various traditions. In a relatively short time, after a period of standard negotiation between merchants and state offi cials, this eclectic system was, to some extent, embedded in the English tradition based on an ounce, pound and yard. While the measures of volume have retained their local character and have not been converted into European units, they have also been globalised through their weight equivalents. The author considers the Zanzibar system of measures and weights in a political and economic context. At the same time, he believes that the key to understanding the process of creating the Zanzibar system of measures and weights is to understand how it was conceptualised by the Western, and also indirectly local recipients.
Lucjan Buchalik
Published: 20 February 2020
AFRYKA, Volume 50, pp 39-64; https://doi.org/10.32690/afr50.2

Abstract:
The Batwa – A Hundred Years of Transformation. Between Globalisation, State and Tourism The article is a deep refl ection on changes taking place in minority cultures, not only in contact with their larger neighbours, but also, and above all, under the infl uence of globalisation processes and the rapid development of tourism. The research is structured in order to present the Batwa people living in the African Great Lakes region from a broader time perspective. The juxtaposition of two research periods, one from the early 20th century (Jan Czekanowski) and the other from the 21st century (Lucjan Buchalik), made it possible to track the changes in the everyday life of this community. On the one hand, the Batwa are marginalised, and on the other hand, they are being absorbed by the surrounding, more dominant peoples. Studying the transformation process, one can notice that the Batwa accepted many changes resulting from their contacts with the outside world. It was the process of forcible displacement from their historical territories that threatened the existence of this community.
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