Medical Education

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 03080110 / 13652923
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1111)
Former Publisher: Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health) (10.1097) , Wiley (10.1046)
Total articles ≅ 10,109
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MEDICUS
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Latest articles in this journal

G. Bourgeois‐Law, G. Regehr, P.W. Teunissen, Lara Varpio
Published: 27 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14285

Teerapat Ungtrakul, Wisut Lamlertthon, Burapen Boonchoo, Chirayu Auewarakul
Published: 26 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14207

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Matt Brunner, Bennett Vogelman, Jeremy Smith
Published: 25 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14244

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Anna Torres, Ewa Domańska‐Glonek, Wojciech Dzikowski, Jan Korulczyk, Kamil Torres
Published: 25 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14245

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Amir H. Sam, Michael D. Reid, Anjali Amin
Published: 25 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14247

Abstract:
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unprecedented challenges in medical school assessments. Final year high-stakes assessments have classically used closed book examinations (CBEs). Alternative methods of assessment such as open book examinations (OBEs) are emerging but are not routinely used in final year medical school exams. OBEs encourage the use of problem-solving skills more akin to those used in real-life. There is currently limited data comparing OBEs with CBEs. A systematic review showed there was insufficient evidence to support the exclusive use of either CBEs or OBEs in assessment, however the studies conducted to date have rarely looked at high-stakes assessments due to concerns about the validity of OBEs1 .
David S. Edelman, Urmi A. Desai, Sarah Soo-Hoo, Marina Catallozzi
Published: 25 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14243

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Prashanti Eachempati, Komattil Ramnarayan, Eachempati Prashanti
Published: 24 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14257

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Maria Weurlander
Published: 24 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14255

Abstract:
It is well known that medical practice involves uncertainty and that medical students and junior doctors need to learn how to tolerate uncertainty and cope with the fear of making mistakes. Becoming a physician also involves learning how to manage uncertainty regarding one's own competence and capability. The authors of 'Journey into uncertainty: Medical students' experiences and perceptions of failure' raise an important and interesting topic that has largely been unexplored.1 In their study, medical students from all four years of training were interviewed to explore experiences of failure from both pre-clinical and clinical settings. The title of the paper is elegantly illustrated by two quotes (p. x), demonstrating that medical students, who are often used to academic success, develop their thinking regarding professional judgments and medical decisions from getting the correct answer on tests.
James Brown, Helen Reid, Tim Dornan, Debra Nestel
Published: 24 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14203

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Chantal Liu, Eri Aung
Published: 23 June 2020
by Wiley
Medical Education; doi:10.1111/medu.14256

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
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