European Journal of Teaching and Education

Journal Information
EISSN : 2669-0667
Current Publisher: Mokslines leidybos deimantas, MB (10.33422)
Total articles ≅ 30
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Latest articles in this journal

Daniela Rosito Michella Munhoz, Luciane Maria Fadel, Carla Galvão Spinillo, Ana Emília Figueiredo de Oliveira, Katherine Marjorie Mendonça de Assis, Dilson José Lins Rabêlo Júnior
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 24-34; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.493

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Evariste Manirakiza, Innocent Hakizimana
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 35-49; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.361

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Fadoua Govaerts
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 59-64; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.495

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Isabel Cuadrado-Gordillo, Inmaculada Fernández-Antelo, Guadalupe Martín-Mora Parra
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 50-58; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.494

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Raluca Pop
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 65-78; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.496

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Sharon Rolé
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 1-11; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.492

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Ilona Petsch, Aglaé Velasco González, Boris Buerke
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 12-23; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i3.297

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Fatiha Sadouki
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 179-189; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i1.188

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Luka Pongračić
European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 169-178; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i1.187

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European Journal of Teaching and Education, Volume 2, pp 190-200; doi:10.33422/ejte.v2i1.189

Abstract:
Higher education is one of the great successes of the twenty-first century. Once the province of an elite few, a university degree is now commonplace as the industrial revolution transforms into the digital age. However, the process of teaching has not changed much since Aristotle taught at the Lyceum: students still meet their teachers to listen and ponder their words of wisdom. This process has become less desirable for some students who now learn entirely online, or those who cannot reconcile the cost of a degree with its overall employment benefits. Dystopian theories have criticized current online educational practice as leading to inadequate reading, poor recall and confused cognition. But technology is seen by others as a panacea for rising costs, massive class sizes and fully engaging digital native students. Universities and colleges need to make some mindful decisions to curtail decreasing interest, less funding and disruptive competition. Is technology a saviour or an impediment in this process?
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