Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2158-3595 / 2158-3595
Published by: North American Business Press (10.33423)
Total articles ≅ 605
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Edward E. Scott, S. Cathy McCrary
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4631

Abstract:
In recent years, there has been concern surrounding the future supply of accounting graduates due to declining accounting program enrollment. This exploratory study investigates which undergraduate class year is likely better suited for increased efforts by accounting faculty to influence students’ decisions to major in accounting, particularly students who studied accounting in high school. Using variables from a prior study that conceptualized an integrative theoretical model based on social cognitive career theory and the theory of reasoned action, we examine the potential effect that precollege coursework in accounting might have on students’ personal interest, accounting technical skills self-efficacy, image of the accounting profession, and intent to major in accounting. Undergraduate business students enrolled in core business courses were surveyed and high school students participated in focus group discussions. Study results indicate differences between groups of students who did (did not) study accounting in high school and suggest freshmen year is influential towards intent to major in accounting.
Lin Li, Robert S. Keyser, Raven Pierson
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4636

Abstract:
Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG) is an initiative that began in 2014, which supported faculty when transforming their previously required textbooks to low-cost, no-cost textbooks. The goal was to help reduce the financial burden on students in their pursuit of a college education. In this study, the researchers developed no-cost textbooks for two undergraduate industrial and systems engineering courses. Both quantitative and qualitative measures are used to assess the effectiveness of the textbook transformation and students’ experience of no-cost learning material in the Industrial and Systems Engineering program. The responses were overwhelmingly positive with respect to the no-cost textbooks in both courses.
Laura May Pipe, Jennifer T. Stephens
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4628

Abstract:
With shifting societal and learner needs, expectations, and experiences, course design must evolve to best support students in both adapting to and creating change. By incorporating the Toward a Liberated Learning Spirit (TALLS) model into backward course design, courses can be designed to encourage intellectual risk-taking and attend to diverse knowledge and ways of knowing that disrupt oppressive and colonizing practices in both content and structure. This article outlines the use of the TALLS model in the backward design of a Native Movement undergraduate course to showcase how courses can be developed for engagement, inclusivity, and active and justice-forward learning.
Bing Li, Zheng Li
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4632

Abstract:
Teacher identity provides a critical analytical lens for the field of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) research in the last decade. However, the complicatedness of identity leaves room for disputes over conceptualizations and components of EFL teacher identity, while at the same allowing for multiple theoretical approaches. This paper reviewed three major challenges facing the EFL teacher identity research field: conceptualization, components, and analytical approaches. Two recent endeavours were synthesized that have stood out among research attempts in this field: a situated learning perspective and a developmental lens. Implications are suggested for EFL research in the future.
Hyun Jung Kang, Matthew Farber, Kimberly A. Mahovsky
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4640

Abstract:
At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, K-5 teachers were forced to shift their teaching practices from in-person instruction to an emergency remote teaching (ERT) format. Using the TPACK framework (Koehler et al., 2014), this study explores how teachers’ pedagogical practices for STEM instruction may have changed during and after ERT. The results indicate no significant differences in terms of direct instruction. Still, there were noticeable changes with collaborative learning and teachers’ use of technological tools in STEM classrooms. Teachers’ self-reporting of their pedagogical practices shift highlights the need for further professional development in the practical use of technological tools to meet current needs.
David M. March, Darren Perrett, Christopher Hubbard
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4638

Abstract:
The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of a new approach for producing evidence-based distractor sets. We use Common Wrong Answers (CWAs), and the associated performance data, generated by candidate responses to open gap-fill tasks, to produce distractor sets for multiple-choice gap-fill tasks based on the same texts. We then investigate whether these distractor sets are effective for use in language tests, in terms of empirical and qualitative review, and consider potential impacts on the production process for test material. This project explores a new and innovative method of content development, and raises the possibility of a new approach to item production that can semi-autogenerate test items in shorter periods of time without affecting quality or reliability. Although the approach is specific to one task type, it is hoped that further research will expand on the applications of the approach to deliver a version that may be operationalised for use across different task types in the development of language assessments.
M. Jayne Fleener
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4622

Abstract:
This paper explores higher education futures post the Corona virus pandemic. It uses futures and social inquiry approaches to explore how post-pandemic times will impact higher education. As a research method, social inquiry connects across social systems to explore complex relationships and impacts, providing a broader perspective of potential influences and synergies of social phenomenon. Social inquiry research shifts focus away from causal affects to explore patterns of connectivity and is therefore an appropriate methodology for futures inquiry. An examination of 141 trends associated with COVID-19 impacts provided the data for futures analyses through a Causal Layered Analysis approach. Three guiding questions including how we can address the challenges and embrace the opportunities of post-pandemic times to create more equitable, inclusive and sustainable higher education futures were explored. Results point to the need to rethink our social metaphors for more equitable and desirable higher education futures. Implications of this research suggest the need to examine and revision the purpose and values of higher education to meet the needs of individuals and society.
Aaron N. Taylor, Jason M. Scott, Joshua L. Jackson
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4629

Abstract:
In this study, we examine the extent to which academic and student engagement factors explain law school grades and first-time bar exam performance. Applying fixed effects linear and logit modeling, our analysis leverages law student transcript data and responses to the Law School Survey of Student Engagement (LSSSE) among students from a diverse group of 20 law schools to estimate academic performance and odds of bar passage. Most notably, we find that GPA improvement during law school is associated with greater odds of passing the bar exam, particularly among students who struggle the most during the first semester. Furthermore, while we find that LSAT scores and undergraduate GPA are predictive (p < 0.05) of both law school performance and bar success (as in previous research), these effects are quite modest. Based on these findings, we propose and discuss several recommendations. These should be helpful to higher education scholars and practitioners, particularly law school deans, administrators, faculty, and academic support staff.
Cecelia M. Wigal
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4637

Abstract:
This paper addresses how one instructor redesigned a face-to-face design course - Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) - known for its collaborative and experiential learning focus to accommodate a synchronous hybrid flexible (HyFlex) delivery. In semesters prior to spring 2020, students in IED learned the design process by practicing it using a project supported by clients and customers in the local community. Due to Covid19, however, students during the 2020 spring and fall semesters and the 2021 spring semester could not physically meet with traditional clients, which is integral to the experiential aspect of the course. It was also difficult for students to physically meet consistently in teams. These alterations had the ability to negatively affect the learning experience. Thus, the collaborative nature of the class and the client identification and interaction structure was revised. This paper describes the course design process focus, project and client identification, and team collaboration process used in the HyFlex delivery to aid learning of the design process.
Elizabeth Keida, Jessica Harris, Barry A. Friedman
Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, Volume 21; https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v21i10.4635

Abstract:
Sixty percent of adults in the United States suffer from chronic disease. Worksite wellness programs that target at-risk populations have positive health benefits. Discover Wellness: Find a Healthier You (DW) is a worksite wellness program intended to improve the higher education employee health by providing an opportunity for participants to learn and practice healthy behaviors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate DW program impact on employee behavior change to reduce chronic disease risk. This study employed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design that assessed self-efficacy and health behaviors of employees of a state university in the northeast United States. Participants experienced significant improvement in stress (t23 = -31.602, p < 0.001), nutrition (t21 = -36.313, p < 0.001), physical activity (t22 = -34.380, p < 0.001), and sleep (t23 = -18.450, p < 0.001). Additionally, anecdotes from participants revealed themes of comradery and reflection on health behaviors.
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