Journal of Marine Science

Journal Information
EISSN : 2661-3239
Published by: Bilingual Publishing Co. (10.30564)
Total articles ≅ 40
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B. K Purandara, Sudhir Kumar, N Varadarajan, Sumit Kant, J V Tyagi
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i3.3476

Abstract:
Submarine groundwater discharges to the coastal ecosystems have been recognised as a source of dissolved chemical substances that cause chemical and ecological effects on sea waters. Groundwater, in many coastal areas, becomes contaminated or at least enriched with a variety of chemical substances and can have higher concentrations of dissolved solids than river water. As a result SGD makes a larger contribution to the flux of dissolved chemical compounds than river run-off. Therefore, the present investigation has been carried out to understand the process of submarine groundwater discharge based on hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical components. Accordingly water balance components were evaluated based on hydrological and hydrogeological investigations. Hydrochemical parameters were also evaluated to understand the impact of seawater intrusion during both pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons of 2019. Study revealed that, there are signatures of considerable quantity of submarine groundwater discharge in parts of Honnavara, Kumta, Ankola and Karwar talukas. The influence of seawater in coastal aquifers is quite rare all along the coast of Uttara kannada district which is attributed to high groundwater recharge(15-20%) occurring in catchment areas.
Patrícia Pinheiro Beck Eichler, Christofer Paul Barker, Moab Praxedes Gomes, Helenice Vital
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i3.3516

Abstract:
We use the excellent sediment recovery of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Exp. 363, in the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) to assess down-core variations in the abundance of warm versus cool benthic foraminiferal species through a warm benthic foraminifers (WBF) curve. The total percentage of the “warm” shallower species group (Laticarinina pauperata, Cibicidoides kullenbergi, C. robertsonianus, Cibicidoides sp., Hoeglundina elegans, and Bulimina aculeata) and of the “cool” species group from deep waters (Pyrgo murrhina, Planulina wuellerstorfi, Uvigerina peregrina, and Globobulimina hoeglundi, Hopkinsina pacifica) at all sites is used to assess paleo temporal and spatial variations in preservation and marine temperature. Our study sites span water depths ranging from 875 m to 3421 m and our results indicate that well-preserved living and fossil foraminifera characterize mudline and core sediments at all water depths attesting the wide environmental tolerance of these species to temperature and pressure. Using magneto-and biostratigraphy datum, these sediments are of Oligocene age. Our low-resolution study showed that with the exception of core 1486B which the linear tendency of warmer species is toward cool sediments in old times, all of them show that older sediments indicate warmer periods than today, which is expected from Miocene to Recent. Our results provide evidence for the preservation potential of deeply buried sediments, which has implications on climate reconstructions based on the population dynamics of calcareous benthic foraminifera.
Eugen Rusu
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i3.3511

Abstract:
Marine environment represents a very important and actual topic. Water bodies cover more than two thirds of the earth’s surface and even after thousands of years, scientists have yet to fully uncover their mysteries. At the same time climate, change has visible effects with a growing dynamics in the last decades and the marine environment is very sensitive to these changes. In order to mitigate the effects of the climate change there is an increasing need of reducing the CO2 emissions and from this perspective the marine environment represents an important source of clean renewable energy. In this respect, the Journal of Marine Science represented even from the beginning an open framework dedicated to the presentation of the discoveries and insights in marine science research.
Hassan Vatandoost
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i3.3121

Abstract:
Mosquitoes belong to order of Diptera. The main important vectors are genus Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. They transmit different agents such bacteria, viruses, and parasites. According to the latest information around 7 hundred million people around the world are suffering from mosquitoborne illness resulting over one million deaths. The main important disease transmitted by Anopheles is malaria. Other genus of mosquitoes including Aedes and Culex species transmit different arboviral disease to human. According to guideline of World Health Organization, the mina control of disease is vectors control. The main important vector control is using different insecticides. Using chemical insecticides for controlling mosquitoes is limited because they develop resistance against these insecticides. So, efforts have been made to control the mosquito vectors by eco-friendly techniques. In this research all, the relevant information regarding the topic of research is research through the internet and used in this paper. An intensive search of scientific literature was done in “PubMed”, “Web of Knowledge”, “Scopus”, “Google Scholar”, “SID”, etc Results shows that one of important environmental friendly vector control is biological control, using different predators and other microorganisms for vector and pest control. Dragonflies do eat mosquitos and serve as mosquito predators. They feed on mosquitos and reduce their number in outdoor areas. The dragonflies are scary biters, but they are dangerous to mosquitos. Worldwide results showed that dragonflies are able to control Aedes, Culex and Anopheles mosquito species. The artificial rearing of these predators and releasing for biological control is an appropriate measure for vector control worldwide.
Samia S. Abouelkheir, Eman A. Abdelghany, Soraya A. Sabry, Hanan A. Ghozlan
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i3.3397

Abstract:
Surfaces submerged in seawater are colonized by various microorganisms, resulting in the formation of heterogenic marine biofilms. This work aims to evaluate the biofilm formation by Cobetia marina alex and doing a comparative study between this promising strain with the two bacterial strains isolated previously from the Mediterranean seawater, Alexandria, Egypt. Three strains; Cobetia marina alex, Pseudoalteromonas sp. alex, and Pseudoalteromonas prydzensis alex were screened for biofilm formation using the crystal violet (CV) quantification method in a single culture. The values of biofilm formed were OD600= 3.0, 2.7, and 2.6, respectively leading to their selection for further evaluation. However, factors affecting biofilm formation by C. marina alex were investigated. Biofilm formation was evaluated in single and multispecies consortia. Synergistic and antagonistic interactions proved in this work lead to the belief that these bacteria have the capability to produce some interesting signal molecules N-acyl Homoserine Lactones (AHLs)
Achmad Fachruddin Syah, Siti Sholehah
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i2.2741

Abstract:
The Banda Sea is one of the routes of global ocean currents that move from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean. This flow is known as Indonesian Through Flow (ITF). The Banda Sea is an area where warm and cold water masses meet, so it has the potential for a thermal front. This study aims to understand the variability of thermal front in the Banda Sea during the El Nino Southern Oscillation period. Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and sea surface temperature (SST) data in 2010, 2012 and 2015 were used in this study. SOI data was obtained from http://www.bom.gov.au and SST data was obtained from http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov. The data were processed using ArcGIS 10.4 software and Ms. Office 2013. The results showed the La Nina period occurs in July - December 2010, the Normal period occurs in July - December 2012, and the El Nino period occurs in May - October 2015. In general, during La Nina, the mean SST has higher values than the other periods. On the other hand, the highest thermal front occurs during the El Niño period (10584), followed by the Normal period (7544) and the lowest during the La Niña period (5961), respectively.
Guangjian Zhong, Renqi Jiang, Hai Yi, Jincai Wu, Changmao Feng, Gang Zhou, Kun Wang, Lina Liu, Ming Sun
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i2.3063

Abstract:
Located in northern South China Sea, Chaoshan Depression is mainly a residual Mesozoic depression, with a construction of Meso-Cenozoic strata over 7000m thick and good hydrocarbon accumulation conditions. Amplitude attribute of -90°phase component derived by phase decomposition is employed to detect Hydrocarbon in the zone of interest (ZOI) in Chaoshan Depression. And it is found that there are evident amplitude anomalies occurring around ZOI. Phase decomposition is applied to forward modeling results of the ZOI, and high amplitudes occur on the -90°phase component more or less when ZOI is charged with hydrocarbon, which shows that the amplitude abnormality in ZOI is probably caused by oil and gas accumulation.
Waluyo Waluyo, Amelia Fitrina Devi, Taslim Arifin
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i2.2859

Abstract:
Coastal vulnerability is a condition of a coastal community or society that leads to or causes an inability to face the threat of danger. The level of vulnerability can be viewed from the physical (infrastructure), social, demographic, and economic vulnerabilities. Physical vulnerability (infrastructure) describes a physical condition (infrastructure) that is prone to certain hazard factors. The coastal vulnerability areas can also be interpreted as a condition where there is an increase in the process of damage in the coastal area which is caused by various factors such as human activities and factors from the nature. This research aims to determine the level of coastal vulnerability in Indramayu coastal Regency with a Coastal Vulnerability Assessment (CVA) analysis approach and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Mapping the status of the vulnerability level of the Indramayu coastal area using the CVA method where the index range generated from the calculation of the four physical parameters mentioned above is between 2.887 – 3.651 or are in moderate vulnerability. A higher vulnerability value is found in several locations such as Juntikedokan and Benda villages. It is necessary to develop coastal protection in this area to prevent damage to the coastal area.
Gongxing Wu, Xiaolong Zhao, Linling Wang
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i2.2962

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to meet the maneuverability requirements of the Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) in different conditions by the effective use of the bow and stern thruster, thus completing the automatic berthing task. Based on the MMG model, the maneuverability mathematical model of the USV with bow and stern thruster was established. And the motion simulation of USV maneuvering was carried out through the numerical simulation calculation. Then the berthing plan was designed basedon the maneuverability analysis of the USV low-speed motion, and the simulation of automatic berthing for USV was carried out. The research results of this paper can be of certain practical significance for the USV based on the support of the bow and stern thruster in the berthing. At the same time, it also provides a certain theoretical reference for the handling of the USV automatic berthing.
J. Swain, P. A. Umesh, M. Baba, A. S. N. Murty
Journal of Marine Science, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.30564/jms.v3i2.3126

Abstract:
The ocean wave climate has a variety of applications in Naval defence. However, a long-term and reliable wave climate for the Indian Seas (The Arabian Sea and The Bay of Bengal) over a desired grid resolution could not be established so far due to several constraints. In this study, an attempt was made for the simulation of wave climate for the Indian Seas using the third-generation wave model (3g-WAM) developed by WAMDI group. The 3g-WAM as such was implemented at NPOL for research applications. The specific importance of this investigation was that, the model utilized a “mean climatic year of winds” estimated using historical wind measurements following statistical and probabilistic approaches as the winds which were considered for this purpose were widely scattered in space and time. Model computations were carried out only for the deep waters with current refraction. The gridded outputs of various wave parameters were stored at each grid point and the spectral outputs were stored at selected locations. Monthly, seasonal and annual distributions of significant wave parameters were obtained by post-processing some of the model outputs. A qualitative validation of simulated wave height and period parameters were also carried out by comparing with the observed data. The study revealed that the results of the wave climate simulation were quite promising and they can be utilized for various operational and ocean engineering applications. Therefore, this study will be a useful reference/demonstration for conducting such experiments in the areas where wind as well as wave measurements are insufficient.
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