International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity

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Published by: Springer Nature (10.1038)
Total articles ≅ 7
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Erratum
, G Clemente, L Busiello, G Lasorella, A M Rivieccio, A A Rivellese,
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 28, pp 342-348; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802589

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Comment
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 27, pp 1297-1299; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802417

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International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 27, pp 287-288; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802255

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, L Lipps Birch
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 26, pp 1186-1193; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802071

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether obesigenic families can be identified based on mothers' and fathers' dietary and activity patterns. METHODS: A total of 197 girls and their parents were assessed when girls were 5 y old; 192 families were reassessed when girls were 7 y old. Measures of parents' physical activity and dietary intake were obtained and entered into a cluster analysis to assess whether distinct family clusters could be identified. Girls' skinfold thickness and body mass index (BMI) were also assessed and were used to examine the predictive validity of the clusters. RESULTS: Obesigenic and a non-obesigenic family clusters were identified. Mothers and fathers in the obesigenic cluster reported high levels of dietary intake and low levels of physical activity, while mothers and fathers in the non-obesigenic cluster reported low levels of dietary intake and high levels of activity. Girls from families in the obesigenic cluster had significantly higher BMI and skinfold thickness values at age 7 and showed significantly greater increases in BMI and skinfold thickness from ages 5 to 7 y than girls from non-obesigenic families; differences were reduced but not eliminated after controlling for parents' BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Obesigenic families, defined in terms of parents' activity and dietary patterns, can be used predict children's risk of obesity.
, L L Birch
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 25, pp 1834-1842; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0801835

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: This study assessed predictors of change in girls' body mass index (BMI) between ages 5 and 7 y and familial aggregation of risk factors associated with childhood overweight. METHOD: Participants included 197 5-y-old girls and their parents, of whom 192 were reassessed when girls were 7-y-old. Three classes of predictors of girls' change in BMI were assessed including girls' and parents' weight status, dietary intake and physical activity. Girls' and parents' BMI and change in BMI were calculated based on height and weight measurements. Girls' dietary intake was assessed using three 24 h recalls; parents' intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Girls and mothers provided reports of girls' physical activity; parents' frequency and enjoyment of activity were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. RESULTS: The most effective model predicting girls' change in BMI between ages 5 and 7 included both child and parent characteristics, specifically girls' BMI at age 5, mothers' change in BMI, fathers' energy intake, fathers' enjoyment of activity, and girls' percentage of energy from fat. In addition, results showed substantial intra-familial associations in weight status and dietary intake and to a lesser extent physical activity, and the presence of multiple risk factors within families. Associations were also noted between girls' and parents' change in BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study highlight the centrality of the family in the etiology of childhood overweight and the necessity of incorporating parents in the treatment of childhood overweight.
Comment
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 25, pp 1405-1406; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0801791

Teruo Nagaya, Hideyo Yoshida, Hidekatsu Takahashi, Yoshihiro Matsuda, Makoto Kawai
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 23, pp 771-4; https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0800961

Abstract:
We present population data on percentage body fat (%BF) by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in 12,287 men and 6657 women aged 30-69 y. In addition, we examined relationships among BMI, %BF and serum lipids (total-cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDLC), TC/HDLC ratio, LDL-cholesterol (LDLC) and triglycerides (TG)) in order to determine whether body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) or %BF by BIA better reflected lipid metabolism. Women had larger %BF than men in all age groups. On the other hand, women aged < 60 y had smaller BMI than corresponding men. Regardless of age, BMI was obviously correlated with %BF (r = 0.743-0.924). As previously reported, high BMI and high %BF were strongly associated with high serum TC/HDLC ratio and TG, and low serum HDLC rather than high serum TC and LDLC. Compared with BMI, %BF by BIA was better correlated with the serum indices except for serum HDLC. These results were found in both sexes, and there was a trend in which younger subjects had stronger correlations among BMI, %BF and serum lipids. Consequently, %BF by BIA (an index of body composition) better reflects serum lipid profile than BMI.
Retraction
International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, Volume 22

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