Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0229-5113 / 1920-7336
Current Publisher: York University Libraries (10.25071)
Former Publisher: Consortium Erudit (10.7202)
Total articles ≅ 102
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ESCI
DOAJ
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Latest articles in this journal

Maha Shuayb, Maurice Crul
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 1-80; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40843

Kyle Reissner, Gül Çalışkan
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 73-74; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40834

Kathryn Tomko Dennler
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 71-72; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40833

Julia Morris
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 75-76; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40835

Natasha Saunders
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 77-78; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40836

Lama Mourad
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 69-70; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40832

Maha Shuayb, Maurice Crul
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 3-8; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40831

Annette Korntheuer, Ann-Christin Damm
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 31-44; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40719

Abstract:
Enabling the successful integration of refugee students into the German schooling system poses a crucial challenge for the coming years. Drawing from the human rights frame- work of the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies standards, we applied a rights-based approach to policy analysis on educational provisions for refugee students from 2012 to 2018. According to international and European law, Germany is obliged to grant similar access to education for nationals as well as refugee children and youth. In reality, the realization of educational rights varies from state to state. This will be highlighted and discussed in this article, using the example of two very different German states, Hamburg and Saxony. The sudden rise of numbers of refugees led only slowly to an increase in educational policy density and intensity on federal state and national levels in 2016 and 2017. We find that the differences in compulsory schooling, models of integration into schooling, and the asylum and settlement policies in both states shape the educational participation of refugee children and youths. Both states implemented parallel integration models that might bear risks of stigmatization and limit educational possibilities. However, transition and language support concepts in both contexts contain integrative phases offer- ing language supports in the regular classrooms. Asylum policies and state-specific settlement policies have profound implications for the rights and access to education. Further, vocational education and training programs play a crucial role, especially in Saxony, to tackle demographic challenges.
Rachel Burke, Caroline Fleay, Sally Baker, Lisa Hartley, Rebecca Field
Refuge: Canada's Journal on Refugees, Volume 36, pp 58-68; doi:10.25071/1920-7336.40658

Abstract:
Higher education remains unattainable for many people seeking asylum in Australia, where temporary visa status renders individuals ineligible for a range of government services including assistance with financing tertiary study. Many universities have responded by offering scholarships and other essential supports; however, our research indi- cates the challenges associated with studying while living on a temporary visa can affect the success of educational assistance. Here we highlight the importance of scholarships and other supports for facilitating access to tertiary study, particularly given the continuation of restrictive government policies, and identify the need for people seeking asylum to inform institutional and community responses.
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