International Nursing Review

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ISSN / EISSN : 0020-8132 / 1466-7657
Current Publisher: Wiley (10.1111)
Former Publisher:
Total articles ≅ 1,742
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H. Alabdulaziz, , N.A. Alasmee,
Published: 26 April 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12677

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Mijung Cho, , , , Hyunseon Jeong, , , Sun Young Jeong, , Hansol Choi, et al.
Published: 24 April 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12679

Abstract:
Aim To identify the factors affecting fear, anxiety and depressive symptoms among frontline nurses working with COVID‐19 patients or are in charge of COVID‐19 screening in Korea. Background Nurses are at a higher risk of COVID‐19 infection because they are in closer, longer‐duration contact with patients. These situations can negatively affect the mental health of nurses. Methods This study analysed data from COVID‐19 module in the Korean Nurses’ Health Study. Data from 906 participants were analysed. To identify the factors influencing mental health, descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed. Results Caring for patients who are COVID‐19‐positive increased levels of fear, anxiety and depressive symptoms of nurses. The hospital safety climate influenced mental well‐being among nurses. Conclusion Caring for patients with COVID‐19 had a negative impact on fear, anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, the higher was the perceived hospital safety climate, the lower were the nurses’ psychological symptoms. Further research on the mental health of nurses is warranted. Implications for nursing and health policy Institutions should manage human resources to enable periodic rotation of nurses’ work and working periods related to COVID‐19. In addition, hospital managers should provide sufficient personal protective equipment, related education, and safety climate.
Z. Gao, F. P. L. Tan
Published: 24 April 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12680

Abstract:
Aim To understand nurses’ responses to COVID‐19 and identify their uptake of changes in the procedure required for the management of COVID‐19 in an inpatient psychiatric ward. Background The infection risk for COVID‐19 in an enclosed inpatient psychiatric ward is high due to living arrangements in the ward and the nature of the infectious disease. Introduction This paper describes inpatient nurses’ experiences, challenges and strategies deployed at the institutional and national levels to contain the spread of infection. Methods Written feedback was collected to understand nurses’ responses and identify their uptake of changes in procedure following the COVID‐19 outbreak in the ward. Findings Nurses felt shocked, worried, isolated, expressed a lack of confidence, and experienced physical exhaustion. COVID‐19 specific challenges were highlighted in the delivery of safe and quality nursing care. Nurses were satisfied with the hospital policy and strategies implemented during the outbreak, acknowledging the importance of support from nursing leaders. Discussion Practical support and strong nursing leadership have been imperative in the battle against the COVID‐19 outbreak in the psychiatric hospital. Psychiatric nursing care was maintained with a modified management and treatment approach. Implications for Nursing practice Nurses' willingness to adjust to the reconfiguration of operations to accommodate changes has been crucial for the healthcare system to run effectively. Good practices and policies established during this crisis should be developed and established permanently in nursing practice. Implications for Health Policy Prompt and effective contingency planning and policymaking at the national and institutional level, targeting human resource management and infection control, can introduce changes and alternative options for nursing care in a pandemic. Conclusion With support from influential nursing leaders, strategies and policies are imperative in ensuring the successful management of COVID situations in an inpatient psychiatric setting.
A. Różyk‐Myrta, , E. Kołat
Published: 24 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12676

Abstract:
Background Difficult times of epidemics, wars and an ageing population have made humanity aware of the important role to be played by those who, at the risk of their own health and lives, help and care for others, are the new superheroes of modern reality. Nurses are the foundation of any healthcare system. Today, many of them are on the front line in the fight against COVID‐19. Without nurses and other health professionals, the world will not win the fight against epidemics or pandemics or achieve the health potential of populations. Aim The main purpose of this article is to draw attention to the heroic work of nurses and the role they have to fulfil in society. Their daily work, hardship and courage can be called heroism, especially when in times of epidemics or pandemics they risk their own lives to care for and support those most in need. Conclusion The greatest heroes of today are health professionals, among whom nurses play a key role. The new superheroes can be a symbol of hope, tenacity, courage and persistence of humanity, no matter how difficult a challenge fate presents. Implications for nursing, and Social Policy.
Gal Furman, I. Bluvstein,
Published: 18 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12672

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Roberta Fontanini, Erica Visintini, Giacomo Rossettini, Davide Caruzzo, Jessica Longhini,
Published: 17 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12669

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Elena Paraíso Pueyo, Ana Victoria González Alonso, , Olga Masot, Miguel Ángel Escobar‐Bravo, Ana Lavedán Santamaría
Published: 9 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review, Volume 68, pp 122-137; doi:10.1111/inr.12659

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 9 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12668

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
X. Zhu, , S. Sirakamon, K. Abhicharttibutra, S. Turale
Published: 8 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review; doi:10.1111/inr.12671

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sue Turale,
Published: 1 March 2021
by Wiley
International Nursing Review, Volume 68, pp 12-14; doi:10.1111/inr.12674

Abstract:
Around the world, nurses are working under enormous pressure providing care to sick and dying patients during the pandemic. Many are faced with increased stress, and other negative effects on their mental health. They are also faced with the possibility of infection and death from COVID‐19. Before the pandemic there was a global shortage of nurses, but this is likely to be exacerbated by the increased demands of caring during COVID‐19 as well as the usual care of non‐COVID patients. One serious concern is that the pandemic and multitudinous effects on the nursing profession will exacerbate nursing attrition and their poor mental health into the future. Another serious concern is whether the profession will be able to attract sufficient numbers of nurses to care for populations into the future. Governments and health policymakers everywhere need to invest in nursing and health care and pay attention to the needs of health systems to ensure a healthy population. It is argued that without this, economies will not recover and prosper, and health systems will not be able to provide quality care.
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