Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2521-1870 / 2521-1889
Current Publisher: Virtus Interpress (10.22495)
Total articles ≅ 41
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SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

Lateef Oyinloye, Temitayo O. Olaniyan, Bamidele O. Agbadua
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 40-49; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i2p4

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Shirley Mo Ching Yeung
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 30-39; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i2p3

Abstract:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Abstract The purpose of this paper is to explore the key
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review; doi:10.22495/cgobr

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Moses Onyoin
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 18-29; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i2p2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Hugh Grove, Mac Clouse, Thomas King
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 8-17; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i2p1

Abstract:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. Abstract The key research question of this paper is to
Vikash Ramiah
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 4-6; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i1editorial

Abstract:
The publication of this issue during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has serious implications for businesses who are now struggling with their business continuation plans. The role of regulators, corporate governance, ethics, equity and equality, home entertainment, cost of debt and the banking industry plays an important role in costs optimization, competitiveness, profitability, corporate social responsibility, social welfare, employment, managing direct and indirect income losses, protecting physical assets and distribution facilities and maintaining price stability. In other words, businesses have to operate in a sustainable way to achieve the United Nations SDGs (good health, zero hunger, no poverty, decent work, industry innovation, clean sanitation, and responsible consumption and production). Although the published papers do not specifically address the pandemic, they touch on the key aspects that the business community is currently trying to solve provide a sufficient scholarly contribution to the previous fundamental papers by Megginson, de Andres, Brogi, and Govorun (2019), Kostyuk and Barros (2018), Guerra, Fischmann, and Machado Filho (2008), Del Brio, Maia-Ramires, and Perote (2006).
Gardachew Worku Fekadu
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 54-60; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i1p5

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Abdelkader Derbali, Lamia Jamel, Mohamed Bechir Chenguel, Ali Lamouchi, Ahmed K Elnagar, Monia Ben Ltaifa
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 41-53; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i1p4

Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to examine if creditors take account of the firm’s governance attributes to decide the cost of debt. Using a sample of 486 US firms over the period 1998-2017, we synthesized governance in six factorial axes. We have demonstrated that the quality audit (independence, frequency of meetings, auditor’s reputation, there is a charter) and financial expertise (percentage of financial experts and ownership of institutional investors) are informative tools creditors that provide information on the quality and reliability of financial reporting. They affect negatively and significantly the cost of debt. Moreover, creditors appreciate the presence of independent directors on the board and reduce the cost of debt required. Furthermore, the independence of the nomination and compensation committees prove irrelevant attributes of governance perspective because creditors do not reduce their risk of the agency. However, the attributes of the board (the size, the number of meetings, the existence of specialized committees, and meetings) are misunderstood by creditors that will increase the interest rate. In addition, the cost of debt increases with the concentration of managerial ownership and majority shareholders. Similarly, attributes reflecting the managerial entrenchment (duality of CEO tenure) are positively correlated to the cost of debt.
Jahidur Rahman, Siyan Ding
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 30-40; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i1p3

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to examine the intellectual capital efficiency of football clubs in the UEFA Champion League between 2010 and 2019. We measure the intellectual capital efficiency of each football club through Value Added Intellectual Coefficient (VAIC) method developed by Pulic (1998, 2004), Ghosh and Mondal (2009), Yalama (2013), Ozkan, Cakan, and Kayacan (2017). Using a sample of 10 football clubs from 7 countries, we find that almost all clubs use their intellectual capital efficiently with great coefficients. We also document that human capital, as the core of intellectual capital, has a positive impact on structural capital. Our finding is significant for sports managers to make strategic management of intellectual sources to create value in the football industry. It suggests that football clubs should pay more attention to intellectual capital like fan loyalty and talented players. Meanwhile, it helps the sports industry to play a great role of human capital in intellectual capital and to increase the competitive advantage of the enterprise.
Vinay Kandpal
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review, Volume 4, pp 8-14; doi:10.22495/cgobrv4i1p1

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