Journal of Management and Sustainability

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ISSN / EISSN : 1925-4725 / 1925-4733
Total articles ≅ 508
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Edwin Ochieng Okul, Raphael O. Nyonje
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p151

Abstract:
The greatest concern in programme management, given the potential of programme or project evaluations to inform decision-making, remains how to ensure the results of an evaluation are used for the intended purpose and how information from an evaluation process and/or the products are applied to practices and decision-making processes. This article presents a research that sought to explore the degree to which organizational leadership style impacts the use of evaluation findings for programme improvement. Based on the pragmatic paradigm and informed by the Utilization Focused Evaluation Model and Knowledge Use Theory, the research adopted a descriptive and correlational design using mixed methods. The study’s sample comprised of 232 project staff from Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) based in Kisumu Central Sub-County, Kenya. Content analysis method that involved coding and identifying themes from respondents’ responses was used to analyse the qualitative data obtained from key informant interviews. Both percentages and frequencies were used to summarize the quantitative data. The instrument reliability was assessed through pilot testing and Cronbach alpha of 0.908 attained. A hypotheses H01: Leadership style does not significantly influence utilization of evaluation results was tested at α = .05 level of significance, but it was rejected because P = 0.000 < 0.05. The study established a statistically significant relationship between organizational leadership style and the utilization of evaluation results. In so doing, it reinforces the existing literature by helping to understand the way organizational leadership style influences the utilization of evaluation results. It fills a gap in the literature, thereby contributes to the appreciation of the factors that enhance and predict the utilization of evaluation results.
Jonas A. S. Schwartzman, Paola Zucchi
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p141

Abstract:
In 2015, about 190 United Nations Member States proposed an ambitious agenda, to be worked on by different actors in society, which was entitled 2030 Agenda. The document was divided into 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are broken down into 169 targets aiming to eradicate poverty and promote a decent life for all. This study aimed to evaluate the perception of healthcare managers about SDGs, especially SDG 3, which addresses Good Health and Well-Being. This cross-sectional observational study identified and analyzed the participants’ profiles through online forms with questions about the general perception of the SDGs, and questions related to SDG 3. The quantitative analysis of the results was performed, in percentage terms, and the qualitative analysis was performed using the five-point Likert scale. Twenty-one technical directors of healthcare services participated in the survey. According to the results, 14 (66.6) of the participants presented medium to high knowledge regarding SDG. In addition, 18 (85.7%) of these professionals understand that the SDGs are of high/very high importance to guide public policies. In general, there is a low expectation for the achievement of the 17 SDGs in Brazil, but it was highlighted that it should be a priority, which SDG could contribute to the achievement of SDG 3: Good Health and well-being as well as the vision of policy recommendations to achieve the SDG 3 targets. This analysis allows contact with SDG and enables a deeper discussion on the topic in healthcare services.
Alexei Pérez-Velázquez, Jorge Laureano Moya-Rodríguez
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p123

Abstract:
The direction for the construction of a sustainable supply chain concept has an evolution and contribution of multiple disciplines that have been elaborated by academic and business bias. From this point on, defining a concept of this subject represents an issue that demands an interpretative effort, since several factors and theoretical approaches influence this category. The objective of this article is to demarcate a theoretical framework on sustainable supply chains and relate it to the barriers present in the measurement of sustainable performance. The method applied in this assessment combines systematic literature review, qualitative analysis of content and bibliometrics, through interconnected steps, which allow a detailing of the dimensions and under dimensions of the sustainability in the supply chain and the identification of the barriers that are associated with the measurement of performance. The material considered is supported through theoretical and empirical studies, which approached the formulation of the concepts and their applicability at different levels of the supply chain. This allows the content analysis to demarcate certain stages of development and the different theoretical approaches that respond and assist the concept. The results contribute to the definition of a roadmap to measure of sustainable performance, an issue that is the basis of future studies over this theme.
Serena Santis, Alberto Incollingo, Francesca Citro
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p111

Abstract:
This study aims to evaluate three dimensions proposed by the IFAC (International Federation of Accountants) in relation to impact financial sustainability. These dimensions are service, revenue, and debt. In 2017 and 2018, a regression analysis was conducted for Italian local governments on the different components of financial sustainability. Based on goal-setting theory, and in combination with the ambition to pursue adequate good financial sustainability, significant results were demonstrated. It was seen that these local governments would have to maintain a good level of autonomy with current revenue. They would also need to control the quantity and quality of service in order to pursue financial sustainability. This study suggests practical implications for policymakers and the managerial class, and it seeks to identify methods to drive and keep financial sustainability under control. It also seeks to define current and future management strategies that focus on pursuing intergenerational equity in local governments.
Maria Carolina Garcia Peixoto Sacchi, João Paulo Pereira Marcicano, Fernando Barros de Vasconcelos
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p100

Abstract:
The study evaluates comparatively some physical and chemical properties of polyamide 6.6 standard and biodegradable. It also evaluates the period of biodegradation of the biodegradable yarn sample and standard sample. The physical properties analyzed were tensile strength, elongation, and tenacity. The chemical properties were related to the behavior of the samples in dyeing and the evaluation of subsequent strength dyeing. The evaluated samples were taken from knitwear produced with polyamide textured filament yarn 80 dtex f 68x1, standard and biodegradable, being purged, bleached, and dyed. The results of the physical tests, although statistically different, have values ​​very near the average, which in practice represent acceptable values ​​within the statistical control process. Both standard and biodegradable samples had the same chemical behavior and there is no difference. Concerning to biodegradation time under laboratory conditions, the carbon dioxide produced by the samples was monitored and measured to determine the percentage of biodegradation according to ASTM D 5511. After 735 days the percentage of biodegradation of the biodegradable yarn was 81.7% and of the normal yarn was 5.2%. This is an expressive gain in ecological terms for synthetic fiber.
Khadija Ajmal, Nallan C. Suresh, Charles X. Wang
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p77

Abstract:
This study examines the relationship between disruptive technologies and their potential impacts on sustainable supply chain management (SSCM), with a focus on the following technologies: Big Data Analytics / Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning, Blockchain, Industry 4.0 / Internet of Things (IoT), 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing, and P2P / Sharing Economy. Based on a comprehensive literature review on both theoretical and practical roles of these disruptive technologies in SSCM, we conduct a cross-case study to analyze the impacts of disruptive technologies on sustainability performance. From 100 application cases of 41 companies in key supply chain management and sustainability journals, we develop a classification scheme based on implementation complexity and sustainability performance of disruptive technologies. The implementation complexity and sustainability performance matrix show that all the cases examined have a positive overall sustainability performance score which indicates that investment in disruptive technologies improves the sustainability performance of firms. However, the impact of each disruptive technology on sustainability performance varies with the types of technology and sustainability dimensions. We also utilize the cases to illustrate how disruptive technologies are applied to key areas of SSCM and identify opportunities for future research.
Sumas Wongsnuopparat, Wei Chunyang
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p56

Abstract:
Sustainability has always run through social and economic activities. As significant economies have competed for their interests in the past few years, this situation has caused a global economic depression. Additionally, this situation worsened due to the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic around the world. The international politics, economy, and Culture are undergoing unprecedented destruction and challenges from the COVID-19 pandemic that has caused businesses in many countries and regions to close or are about to face bankruptcy. More and more employees are getting laid off every day since the COVID-19 began. Even employees who are employed are feeling unsecured. So, in the face of uncertainties and difficulties facing corporations worldwide, we need to find a better way to extend the company's life cycle in a more structured and sustainable manner. The main research question for this study is "What are the factors that have significant effects on organizational sustainability?" In this study, twelve independent variables including Leadership (L.S.), Management (M.N.), Culture (C.T.), Structure (S.T.), Workforce diversity (W.D.), Organizational age (O.A.), Staff age (S.A.), Mindset (M.S.), Technology (T.N.), Organizational dimension (O.D.), Group structure (G.S.), Business locations (B.L.) and one dependent variable called Sustainability (SUS) is the studied. This study aims to understand the structural relationships among these potential variables that could influence corporate sustainability. The dataset utilized to test the hypothesis postulated in this study using Structural Equation Models (SEM). This study suggested that the Leadership, Management, and Staffing Age significantly affects organizations towards organizational sustainability. Considering the different politics, economy, and cultural backgrounds in countries and industries, the study also found that some irreconcilable factors affect the performance of leadership, management, and staff ages. Thus, this study identified effective leadership, management, and staff age as strategies to lead organizations further towards organizational sustainability. The results of this study provide some valuable suggestions for all companies facing the COVID-19 threats right now to bring back to life and become more sustainable in the years to come and provide some evidence for future researchers to explore this field further.
Evelyn Xiao
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n1p232

Abstract:
Reviewer Acknowledgements for Journal of Management and Sustainability, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2021.
Fenjie Qi, Yaxin Zhou, Shuo Feng
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p43

Abstract:
Climate change has brought people’s attention in recent decades, which demonstrates a critical phenomenon of increased natural disaster risks. The consequences of natural hazards are highly potential to bring significant economic, reputational, social, and environmental impacts on Australia’s tourism industry. Considering the close relationship between the unique natural environment and the local tourism industry, natural disasters always play critical roles in terms of the destinations’ resilience. This paper aims to examine the cause-and-effect of natural disaster resilience for the tourism industry in Eastern Australia with the particular concern of bushfire. Representative bushfire events will be studied to locate the industry’s preparedness and the existed action gaps mainly with the focus on government and destination management organizations, as well as discuss the disaster prevention implications, direct/indirect impacts and tourism-related issues. Also, a natural disaster resilience assessment framework for the industry will be developed with the key indicators from multiple aspects. A couple of future directions will be proposed regarding recovery methods, including the needs of destination image recovery, supportive policies for small businesses and cross-functional partnership.
Peter King
Journal of Management and Sustainability, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v11n2p15

Abstract:
Much has been written about trust and trust-building, but no consensual definition of trust has been developed. In this article, the definition of trust as a catalyst is proposed based on a deduction from an aggregation of peer-reviewed articles from across several disciplines and hermeneutic examination of the contents. The paper suggests that discipline-related points of view and common usage of trust as a noun and or a verb leads to confusion in trying to develop a consensual definition. Given the accepted universality of trust, a consensual definition would help achieve a further understanding of both trust and trust-building. The proposed definition permits recognition of discipline-related definitions and suggests the focus of trust should be directed to establishing the conditions under which trust enables successful exchange interactions (i.e., trust-building). The separation of trust and trust-building has implications for management and other relationships. Suggestions for further research are included.
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