Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2155-6156 / 2155-6156
Published by: OMICS Publishing Group (10.4172)
Total articles ≅ 1,033
Current Coverage
ESCI
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

, Effendi Oulan Gustav Hakim Nata Buana
Published: 29 January 2020
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 11, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.20.11.840

Abstract:
Diabetes mellitus is the third largest cause of death in Indonesia and 90% of the cases are diabetes mellitus type 2. Diabetes mellitus type 2 can be prevented and controlled by healthy lifestyle, such as consumption of foods with low glycemic index. Indonesia has high dependence on white rice as staple food, while it is relatively high in glycemic index. One alternative to overcome this problem is analog rice from low glycemic index raw materials such as arrowroot and cowpea. The study was in vivo assay using nested design to examine the hypoglycemic properties of analog rice. The analog rice physical properties analysis results showed that all analog rice formulations were acceptable, therefore selected analog rice were the formulation with the highest and lowest arrowroot levels (A1B1C3 and A4B1C3 formulations). The chemical properties analysis results showed that the rice was high in dietary fiber, which are 17.33% (w/w) and 21.30% (w/w). The glycemic index value of analog rice is 39.40 and 37.12. Analog rice had hypoglycemic effect on rat blood sugar by significantly reducing blood sugar for 21 days, which were 18.97% and 25.50%. Analog rice supplementation for 21 days in rats could also improve the pancreatic beta cell profile.
Muhammad Asharib Arshad, Samia Arshad, Sohaib Arshad, Hina Abbas
Published: 1 January 2020
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 11, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.20.11.e101

Abstract:
Diabetes mellitus is one of the commonest chronic diseases, resulting in a lot of complications including a diabetic foot ulcer. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) including the risk to progress to amputation, also deteriorate the quality of life of the patients and their care givers. Diabetic foot ulcers not only affect the physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients but the social, psychological and economic aspects of the patient’s life are also affected. Research studies have shown that factors such as female gender, obesity, presence of Peripheral Vascular Disease and stressful life events further decrease the quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. This editorial advocates that diabetic foot ulcers being a huge burden on the healthcare system also deteriorate the quality of life of patients.
Brianna Twomey
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.4172/2155-6156-c1-103

Abstract:
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Bot Dy, Ahmed Km, Shindang J, Ekwempu A, Olaniru Ob, Chundusu D, Bot Sy, Mwantok Ea, Pwajok Pg, Ojo Eo, et al.
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10, pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.831

Abstract:
Background: Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of insulin-secreting islet cells of the pancreas by several islet cell-specific autoantibodies that can be detected many months or years before the onset of diabetes. The presence of these antibodies can be attributed largely to environmental agents and also genetic factors. Knowing the frequency of these autoantibodies in a population is an important step for a better understanding, diagnosis and management of Type 1 diabetes. The aim of the research was to screen and identify those at greatest risk of diabetes (relatives of diabetic patients) early in life, as a precautionary step with the hope to deliver care in order to avoid the disease and its complications later in life. Method: The study was conducted on eighty-eight apparently healthy young and adolescent first-degree relatives of diabetic patients in Jos metropolis. Blood samples were collected, centrifuged and serum was aseptically separated within two hours. A commercial ELISA test kit - Medizym® anti-IA2 was used to determine the presence of anti-IA-2 autoantibodies in serum obtained from participants enrolled in the study. Results: The results obtained showed twelve participants of both sexes (13.64%) having positive titers of the IA-2 antibodies which were statistically significant. Conclusion: From the results, we conclude that with significant titers of the IA-2 antibodies among young adolescents, there is the likelihood of them developing diabetes later in life depending on the period of exposure to the factors responsible for triggering the autoimmune process. The results are hereby discussed and recommendations made.
Yong-Fu Xiao, Yixin (Jim) Wang
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10, pp 1-11; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.832

Abstract:
Diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia and polyuria, results from the body either producing insufficient insulin or using the produced insulin inefficiently to metabolize glucose. Type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is recognized as reduction of beta-cell mass mostly due to autoimmune destruction. However, insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction or loss are potentially the main causes of Type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Due to long-term hyperglycemia and microvascular impairment, complications are common, including heart, kidney, liver and other organs. Therefore, diabetic patients have the overall high risk of dying prematurely by heart attack, stroke, liver dysfunction and kidney failure. Diabetes has become one of the major global threats to human health. Development of safe and potent therapeutics is thus urgently needed. Animal models remain irreplaceable for discovering, validating and optimizing novel therapeutics for their safe use in clinics. Selection of appropriate animal models is critical for obtaining crucial data to translate preclinical research to clinical trial. It has been recognized that the pancreas structure and pathophysiology in rodents greatly differ from those in humans, but in nonhuman primates (NHPs) are more similar to humans. Many researchers have used spontaneously developed or drug-induced diabetic NHPs as the models to investigate diabetes progression and novel therapies. This article summarized some characteristics of the disease progression in a large pool of diabetic NHPs.
Muna Alshammari, Gary Adams, Richard Windle, Dianne Bowskill
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.821

, Nurani Istiqamah, Annisa Maryani, Madihah
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10, pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.835

Abstract:
Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. rhizomes and Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruits have been potential as anti-diabetic herbs. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose levels or hyperglycemia due to deficiency or ineffectiveness of insulin. The combined use of natural herb (polyherb) is expected to produce a holistic effect in maintaining health and treating disease. This study aims to determine the effectiveness and optimum dosage combination C. xanthorrhiza rhizomes and A. blimbi fruit extract as anti-diabetic herbs in decreasing blood glucose levels, improve pancreas histopathology and the liver structure repair of diabetic male Wistar rats induced by streptozotocin. Twenty-one rats were divided into eighteen diabetic and three nondiabetic rats. The diabetic rats were divided equally into six groups; treated with CMC 0.5% (diabetic control), glibenclamide dosage 0.45 mg/kg bw (reference), extract of C. xanthorrhiza dosage 17.5 mg/kg bw, extract of A. blimbi dosage 750 mg/kg bw, combined extract dosages 767.5 and 383.75 mg/kg bw for 21 constitutive days. The results showed that a higher dosage of combination extract (767.5 mg/kg bw) that significantly lowered blood glucose levels (54.86 ± 34.61%) and improved the pancreas histopathology characterized by increasing number (9.33 ± 0.58) and diameter (53.34 ± 8.82) of Langerhans islet as well as decreasing insulitis degree compared to diabetic rats (p<0.05) and from treatment dosage 383.75 mg/kg bw could decrease the diameter of central vein and percentage necrotized cells of hepatocytes which significantly different with reference and diabetic control (p<0.05), and comparable with nondiabetic rats. In conclusion, the combined extracts were more effective than single extract to treat diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin.
, Laila El-Morsi Aboul-Fotoh, Aliaa Monir Higazi
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10, pp 1-7; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.830

Abstract:
Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia and accompanied by long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs. Several studies have shown that Glycated Albumin (GA) is more reliable DM monitor and a better marker of glycemic control in patients with fluctuating and poorly controlled type 2 DM. Moreover, serum GA is not affected by factors that affect hemoglobin metabolism. The aim of the study: To study the value of serum glycated albumin as a new marker for glycemic control in diabetic children. Methods: 30 diabetic children were included in the study in addition to 20, sex and age matched apparently healthy children as a control group. The associations among HbA1c, GA, and GA/HbA1c ratio were examined, referred and managed in Children’s Hospital, Minia University. The results: Plasma glucose, GA and HbA1c measurements were done at baseline, after the 1st and after the 3rd months for all the subjects. GA levels strongly correlated with HbA1c% in the diabetic group. The mean GA and HbA1c values were significantly lower in control group than in diabetic group (p<0.001). GA, HbA1c and the ratio decreased significantly within 4 weeks, but GA showed a significantly larger decrease than HbA1c. Conclusion: GA seems to be more accurately reflect short term glycemic control than HbA1c.
Asmaa M Soliman, Elham T Awad, Abdelrahman B Abdelghffar, Ibrahim A Emara, Eman M Abd El Azeem
Published: 1 January 2019
Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.35248/2155-6156.19.10.826

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