South Atlantic Quarterly

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0038-2876 / 1527-8026
Current Publisher: Duke University Press (10.1215)
Former Publisher:
Total articles ≅ 1,222
Current Coverage
SCOPUS
AHCI
SSCI
LOCKSS
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SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

Ellen Samuels, Elizabeth Freeman
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 245-254; doi:10.1215/00382876-8915937

Abstract:
This introduction connects the temporal regimes that disabled people and communities negotiate with the universalization of “crip time” during the COVID-19 pandemic, in full swing at the time of this writing. It discusses the articles and artwork in this special issue in terms of how they express the temporalities lived by disabled subjects both as confining and, potentially, as means of critiquing and transforming the time discipline of late-stage capitalism.
Christine Sun Kim, Amanda Cachia
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 279-283; doi:10.1215/00382876-8915980

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Jake Pyne
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 343-361; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916088

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Eli Clare
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 255-256; doi:10.1215/00382876-8915952

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María Elena Cepeda
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 301-320; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916046

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Jina B. Kim, Sami Schalk
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 325-342; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916074

Abstract:
Since 2016, searches for and discussions of self-care in the United States have increased significantly. While authors who identify as people of color and/or queer critique the capitalist co-optation of this term by linking it conceptually to the work of Audre Lorde, engagement with disability remains conspicuously absent all around, given that Lorde’s use of this concept comes from her 1988 essay on cancer, “A Burst of Light.” This article proposes a reclamation of the radical crip, feminist, queer, and racialized roots of self-care offered by Lorde. Using crip-of-color critique, this article argues that a radical politics of self-care is inextricably tied to the lived experiences and temporalities of multiply marginalized disabled people. It attempts to hold the complexity of claiming time for ourselves to slow down, to take care, while also understanding the real urgency of our contemporary moment. This piece thus proposes that, while crip time is often about slowing and adapting models of time and productivity, crip time as a concept is also urgently needed to understand self-care outside of capitalist imperatives.
Mimi Khúc
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 369-388; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916116

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Finn Enke
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 363-367; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916102

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Margaret Price
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 257-277; doi:10.1215/00382876-8915966

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Matt Hyunh, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Curated By Mimi Khúc
South Atlantic Quarterly, Volume 120, pp 389-391; doi:10.1215/00382876-8916130

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