Brazilian Review of Econometrics

Journal Information
ISSN : 19802447
Current Publisher: Fundacao Getulio Vargas (10.12660)
Total articles ≅ 400
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Margaret Leighton, Priscila Souza, Straub Stephane
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.78513

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Caio Almeida, Diego Brandao
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.77132

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Carlos Eduardo De Freitas, Nelson Leitão Paes
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.75504

Cezar Santos, Mariana Weiss, Guilherme Zimmermann
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.76943

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Bruno Cesar Aurichio Ledo, Caio Matteucci De Andrade Lopes
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.73975

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Caio Almeida, Fernando Cordeiro
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 39; doi:10.12660/bre.v39n12019.76365

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Caio Almeida, Pedro Engel, Joao Paulo Valente
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 38, pp 321-355; doi:10.12660/bre.v38n22018.76136

Abstract:By analyzing a panel of macro data including both Emerging Markets (EM) and Advanced Economies (AE), we identify that an acceptable level of model uncertainty helps to explain the equity premium existing in all these markets. Model uncertainty aversion is in general higher for EMs than for AEs. In addition, the degree of cross-sectional heterogeneity across countries' estimates of model uncertainty aversion is smaller than the corresponding heterogeneity of the risk aversion estimates in a traditional CRRA preference. We also compute separate costs of model risk and uncertainty for these economies in terms of present consumption, and conclude that the most significant effects come from uncertainty.
Marcus Gerardus Lavagnole Nascimento, Carlos Antonio Abanto-Valle, Mario Jorge Mendonça
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 38, pp 357-373; doi:10.12660/bre.v38n22018.74235

Abstract:In this paper, a Multivariate Spatial Regression model with Endogenous Variables is proposed. In order to deal with endogeneity and spatial dependence, the instrumental variables (IV) methodology and an autoregressive spatial structure, frequently used in econometric applications, are implemented. A Bayesian inference procedure based on simulation schemes designed to obtain samples from the posterior distribution of model parameters is developed. Finally, the methodology is illustrated through an application to the impact of broadband access on the economic sectors.
Priscilla Tavares, Vladimir Ponczek
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 38, pp 197-219; doi:10.12660/bre.v38n22018.73437

Abstract:In this paper, we provide evidence of the effects of teacher’s pay increases on students’ learning in the context of developing countries (São Paulo state public education). We explore the variation in teachers' pay, given by the rule of additional salaries by length of service (quinquennium rule). We observed each teacher's eligibility for salary increases and explored the differences in the teachers’ admission date throughout the year to calculate the exposure time of teachers treated at higher salaries. We employ a difference-in-differences strategy to control for unobserved characteristics of teachers belonging to different admission cohorts. Our results are in line with what is found in the international empirical literature: salary increases for incumbent teachers do not seem to affect their productivity and, therefore, are not capable of impacting student learning in basic education.
Andrea Lepine
Brazilian Review of Econometrics, Volume 38, pp 221-261; doi:10.12660/bre.v38n22018.75505

Abstract:This paper studies the effects of a government scholarship program for low-income college students in Brazil, the Prouni. In order to deal with selection effects, I use propensity score matching based on observable student characteristics and a proxy for previous student performance. The results are robust across different specifications, and suggest that students who received a scholarship perform better than comparable students and take less time to reach the final year of college. These effects are higher for students with full scholarships than for students with partial scholarships, and seem to be partially driven by a decrease in the proportion of students who work and an increase in time spent studying.