Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 0852-0089 / 2406-8098
Current Publisher: LPPM UNPAR (10.26593)
Total articles ≅ 78
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Latest articles in this journal

Konrad Kebung
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 108-121; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i2.4037.108-121

Abstract:
This article presents the thoughts of Michel Foucault, a cultural historian, philosopher, and intellectual, who brilliantly analyses the historical events of the past as creative criticisms for shaping human attitudes today. Through this historical analysis, Foucault examines the ways in which subjects were formed from classical times to the present. Foucault sees how this process takes a long time, starting from the subject as formed through various discourses to the subject as forming itself. To arrive at the latter, Foucault brings his readers to the classical Greco-Roman era to see how humans live their freedom and responsibilities. He also shows them various practices of the self through meditation and inner examination, as well as the practice of telling the truth (parrhesia) to oneself and to others. All this in the era was known as ethics and also seen as a practice of freedom. For Foucault, life must always be seen as a work of art that requires the attention of the artist from time to time in order to arrive at an art level considered useful and valuable to many people. Foucault calls this an aesthetic of existence, where life is not merely seen as something given, but also that must always be fought for creatively from day to day. Life must be seen as an unstable condition in which there are always cracks, therefore it has to be fixed from time to time. This is what Foucault calls a model of human existence.
Hadrianus Tedjoworo
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 95-107; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i1.4036.95-107

Abstract:
'Chronicles' is a journal column of "MELINTAS" which contains information about the various events, congresses, conferences, symposia, necrologies, publications, and periodicals in the fields of philosophy and theology.
Gerardette Philips
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 1-21; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i1.4031.1-21

Abstract:
The core feature of the spiritual life is human and divine desiring. Understanding and facing our desires as well as comprehending the desires of the Divine, remain a struggle for the human soul. Spiritual directors are likely to spend a considerable amount of time on this struggle and need to develop great skill in recognizing and responding to their directees’ desire for God and in helping them discern and unveil the illusory desires. This article explores the theories and insights of the spiritual stage theory from Islam through Sufism using the psychology of Al-Hakim al Tirmidhi and Christianity through Teresa of Avila, and the spiritual direction best suited for spiritual directees at the different stages. The exchange of both of these approaches presented here can perhaps enrich the spiritual directors’ style to travellers along the spiritual journey who come to them for direction. This mystical spirituality, articulated in Sufism from the Stations (maqamat) of Hakim Al-Tirmidhi and the mansions of Teresa of Avila, though experienced within different spiritual frameworks, brings a commonality in the exchange between them. Their experience of God both as directees and as Shaykh or Spiritual Director has much to offer to present day spiritual directors.
Staniselaus Eko Riyadi
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 22-39; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i1.4032.22-39

Abstract:
Violence is a crime condemned by religions, but religions in the world are apparently involved in some kind of violence. It has been considered problematic that some scriptural texts are showing violent acts that seem to be ‘authorised’ by God, even ‘allowed’ by God, or celebrated by the people. How should we understand such problematic texts? Is there any violence authorised by God? Christianity has been dealing with the interpretation of violent acts in biblical texts from the Old Testament as well as from the New Testament. This article suggests that violence in the biblical texts must be understood within the context of defining religious identity of Israel among the other nations that have their own gods. Scriptures do not promote violence, but has recorded the historical experiences of Israel in their confrontation with other nations. Therefore, violence in the biblical texts cannot be referred to as a sort of justification for any violent acts by religions in our multireligious and multiethnic society.
Yanuarius Muni
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 195-218; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i2.4041.195-218

Abstract:
Fake news spreads quickly and changes situations in the society. It has become a sort of linguistic violence circulating negative ideologies and perspectives that slowly destroy people both mentally and physically. The growing tendency of circulating fake news raises a serious problem in the society and moreover among Christians, for important human values, including religious values, are disregarded. Christian understanding of human beings as created in the image of God implies that they have the capacity to use good words to build a sacred society, that is, a society blessed by God. However, the tendency to retrieve and to disseminate information too quickly occurs almost automatically in this age of information, which ironically threatens every good intention of the self in building a trusting community. This article explores the elements of Christian communication based on the Church teachings on the subject matter, in order to counter the tendency of desacralisation of the self on social media and to promote truthful as well as deliberating communication in the society.
Andreas Doweng Bolo
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 159-173; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i2.4039.159-173

Abstract:
Tracing the history of philosophical thoughts in Indonesia might lead to the fact that they build up from the daily experiences of Indonesian people. Philosophical thoughts are born of real situations lived by the people responding to the challenges in their lives. In the effort of tracing the history, one may find the courageous leaders of colonial era and the thinkers emerging after the colonial era who speak against the suppression of humanity in any form, whether in the context of politics, religion, culture, or economy. Indonesian thinkers are people who are fearless and devoting their lives to humanity. This may remind one of the classic slogan sapere aude (dare to think for themselves). In this article, the author correlates experiences, theories, and possibilities towards the future concerning the emergence of philosophical thoughts in Indonesia from a hermeneutical viewpoint. This article walks through the course of outlining an understanding of philosophy, applying hermeneutics to correlate the philocophical outline with the thoughts of Indonesian thinkers, and showing new perspective in seeing the dynamics of philosophical thoughts in Indonesia.
R. F. Bhanu Viktorahadi
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 122-158; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i2.4038.122-158

Abstract:
Renouncing the reality of plurality and multiculturality can provoke religious violence and social conflicts. The emergence of violence might have been one of the consequences of the deteriorating role of education, particularly the religious education, in the society. As part of the national education system in Indonesia, religious education bears on its shoulders the responsibility to propagate the values of plurality and multiculturality. It also disseminates other related values such as inclusiveness and tolerance, which are of paramount significance in building a society characterised by peace, harmony, solidarity, and respect to people of different cultures and religions. It is therefore an important role of Islamic Religious Education and Catholic Religious Education in Indonesia to cultivate ways of thinking that support plurality and multiculturality. This article analyses degrees of integration of plurality and multiculturality understanding in the 2013 curricula of Islamic Religious Education and Catholic Religious Education in high schools. The students’ better understanding of plurality and multiculturality can help them promote the above mentioned values as part of God-given reality in the society.
Edy Syahputra Sihombing
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 40-56; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i1.4033.40-56

Abstract:
The Holy Spirit in Christianity is portrayed as God who exists actively through human experiences. The presence of the Holy Spirit who dwells in human’s heart is a unique presence of one of the Persons of the Trinity. However, the Holy Spirit’s presence in human experiences is not always identified as the ‘Person’ of God. Here the language of dogmatic theology might not be clear and inspiring to Christians to recognise the unique presence of the Holy Spirit in their hearts and in the living of faith in the Church. There is a need to contemplate the aspects of human personal experience of the Holy Spirit in relation to the theological language of the Persons in Trinity so that the faithful may discern the presence of the Holy Spirit in their lives. It is therefore important that in theological discussions about the Holy Spirit there is an awareness to view the need of ‘translating’ theological language into simpler language of catechism. In order that the faithful are able to identify the presence and the works of the Holy Spirit in experiences, in prayer, and in the life of faith, catechetical language about the Holy Spirit should bring more images related to human experience.
Joko Umbara
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 77-94; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i1.4035.77-94

Abstract:
An experience of the cross of Jesus Christ in Christian theology brings the sense of paradox. Christ’s death on the cross reflects the fate of humanity within the context of Christian faith. The cross is also seen as a mystery that tells the tragic story of humans who accept their punishment. However, the cross of Jesus Christ also reveals meanings that challenge Christians to find answers in their contemplation of the cross. The cross becomes a stage for human tragic drama, which might also reveal the beauty of death and life. It is the phatos of humanity, for every human being will die, but it is also seen as the tree of life hoped for by every faithful. On the cross is visible God’s self-giving through the love shown by the crucified Christ. God speaks God’s love not only through words, that is, in the teachings of Jesus Christ, but also through Christ’s loving gesture on the cross. The cross of Christ is the culmination of God’s glory and through it, God’s glory is shown in the beauty of divine love.
Adi Putra Panjaitan
Published: 7 July 2020
MELINTAS, Volume 35, pp 174-194; doi:10.26593/mel.v35i2.4040.174-194

Abstract:
Generally, listening to music is a fun activity to almost everyone. Furthermore, music can be used as an entertainment and a means of expressing the self. Music can be found everywhere easily, whether in private or in public places, and it has become part of human life. In this article, the author explores the power of music through its particular elements in relation to human character education. In other words, music is considered to have influences in shaping the character of the self, albeit in daily experiences music is often seen as merely entertainment. The elements of music, which includes melody, rhythm, harmony, beat, dynamics, timbre, and lyrics, are correlated to the effects each may bring towards the listeners. In this approach, music is considered to have a transformative role in shaping and orienting the character of the listener, since the person is not merely focused on the thinking mind, but to the sensitivity of the self perceiving the sound of music.
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