College & Research Libraries News

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ISSN / EISSN : 0099-0086 / 2150-6698
Published by: American Library Association (10.5860)
Total articles ≅ 8,550
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College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.2.50

Abstract:
Once Upon a Time in the Academic Library: Storytelling Skills for Librarians UT iSchool alumni create endowed scholarship for BIPOC students ACLS launches Commission on Fostering and Sustaining Diverse Digital Scholarship Apply now for IMLS Native American, Native Hawaiian Library Services grants University of Arkansas joins ASERL How to Be a Peer Research Consultant: A Guide for Librarians and Students Bloomsbury acquires ABC-CLIO CLIR announces new publication awards
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.2.89

Abstract:
Special Collections and Archives (SCA) at Northern Arizona University’s (NAU) Cline Library was awarded a $349,526 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support the digitization of 400 rare and unique moving images held by SCA and three regional cultural heritage partners: the Hopi Tribe, the Hualapai Tribe, and Diné College on the Navajo Nation. SCA holds early images, including river running the Colorado River, exploration of Grand and Glen canyons, and landscapes of the American Southwest. The goal of the three-year project is to preserve and make available these historically and culturally significant, at-risk analog moving images that depict people, places, and events on the Colorado Plateau. The project also supports Cline Library’s implementation of the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials, which offer guidance for nontribal institutions regarding the culturally responsive and respectful care of materials connected to Native American communities. The protocols will guide the selection of and access to films, which will be done in collaboration with tribal partners. In the third year of the project, NAU and its tribal partners will contribute a selection of the digitized films to the Tribesourcing Southwest Films project (https://tribesourcingfilm.com) for culturally appropriate description and re-narration by communities of origin.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.2.49

Abstract:
Welcome to the February 2022 issue of C&RL News. The COVID-19 pandemic, along with other recent social and political events, provided, and continues to provide, opportunities to re-evaluate service models, launch innovative projects, and adapt to a variety of new environments.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.2.92

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Google year in search News engagement Newsroom closures Vinyl record sales
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.3.136

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Anne-Marie Deitering Lis Pankl Diane Dias De Fazio Nan Schichtel
Isabel Soto-Luna
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.3.125

Abstract:
For nearly the last two years, we have faced new challenges in unprecedented ways due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thanks to current technology, however, we have been able to get creative to keep things moving as much as possible and find new ways to do things, including searching for jobs. Like many others, I found myself having to traverse a job search process that involved doing only virtual interviews. In my case, however, I am a new librarian (class of 2018) and this was my first full job search in the profession.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.3.129

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Ah-ah-ah-ah, staying online, staying online,Ah-ah-ah-ah, staying online, staying online, Ah-ah-ah-ah, staying online –ine-ine-ine,I’m staying online! Sing along with the famous tune by the Bee Gees. White suit and disco ball are not required. I recently became an online reference and instruction librarian. During the pandemic, my institution made the difficult decision to have fewer physical locations and encouraged students to stay online. I was given the opportunity to continue online full-time as a remote worker. I live in Virginia while the main campus is in Florida. We also have a librarian in Georgia, as part of our geographically dispersed team, who works with some of the education centers. I absolutely love being an online librarian. I provide large group and individual instruction through Zoom, work within the learning management system as an embedded librarian, and answer questions by phone, text, email, and the library chat virtual reference desk. But getting here was quite the journey.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.3.132

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Anti-Defamation League Berkeley Earth National Alliance on Mental Illness
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.3.100

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As a new reference librarian, one of the most common questions I’ve encountered over the past year is some variation of “How do I find a peer reviewed scholarly article?” While the goal of professors who’ve assigned this task is to educate students on the nature of academic research, students are usually unclear on what “peer review” means and how to find this information. Often it is quite literally just a check box item amongst the facets. On its face, peer review as a means of authentication seems valid. Why not have a qualified scholar or two review a work to see if it is accurate and relevant for publication? Unfortunately, as we know from countless studies, peer review is subject to systemic and individual bias across multiple genres and forms that undermines the legitimacy of the process. Within the open access movement, this has led to calls for more transparency. Scholars see a move to open peer review, especially as part of the movement for open science, as a solution to the inefficiencies and inequities of a closed process. Certainly, the technologies of publishing on the open web now make this easier than ever, with annotation tools, commenting features, and automation, and this would presumably solve for bad actors who take advantage of the peer review process to enact academic theft, fraud,4 or private retaliation.
College & Research Libraries News, Volume 83; https://doi.org/10.5860/crln.83.4.185

Abstract:
Preprints pro and con Higher education enrollment Journal editorial representation Podcasts
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