Business and Economic Research

Journal Information
EISSN : 2162-4860
Current Publisher: Macrothink Institute, Inc. (10.5296)
Total articles ≅ 479
Archived in
SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

Josphat Nyoni, Tendai Vanesssa Jaravaza, Matthew Mare, Martin Dandira, Elias Kandjinga
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 76-89; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18228

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Saliu Mojeed Olanrewaju, Ogunleye Edward Oladipo
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 90-122; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18481

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Li-Jen Yeh, Hsien-Chang Kuo
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 123-144; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18482

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Ethan Hunt, Hyungjoon Jeon, Sang Lee
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 62-75; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18369

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Soeb Md. Shoayeb Noman
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 207-217; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18433

Abstract:
Determining the health insurance premium is the most important aspect in providing social health insurance. In measuring the rate, it is needed to calculate the cost of providing the service. One possible methodological tool of calculating the cost is the contingent valuation method for the evaluation of the consumers’ capacity and their willingness to pay for the services. This study applied a Logit model, having binary depended variable with follow up dichotomous choice at different premium levels, to estimate the factors associated to joining the social health insurance scheme. The study found that 80.1 percent of the government employees of Bangladesh wants to pay on average 6.69 percent of their basic salary as social health insurance premium. The result shows that younger peoples are less willing to pay while older people are more willing to pay for social health insurance. The study also revealed that the area of residence and no of visit to doctor play a key role in determining the willingness to pay. This study should help the policymakers to formulate and implement the social health insurance scheme in Bangladesh.
Paula M. Caligiuri, Helen De Cieri
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 1-19; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18411

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Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 145-164; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18380

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Richard Bwalya, Mabvuto Zulu
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 44-61; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18451

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Yu Hsing
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 218-226; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18604

Abstract:
Based on an extended IS-LM-AS model, this study finds that if the Argentine peso depreciates 1% versus the U.S. dollar, the consumer price in Argentina would increase by 0.2518%. In addition, more structural fiscal deficit as a percent of potential GDP, more M2 supply, a higher U.S. price level, and a higher expected price level would raise Argentina’s consumer price level. Therefore, partial exchange rate pass-through is confirmed for Argentina.
Mohsen Mohaghegh, A. S. Valipour
Business and Economic Research, Volume 11, pp 252-265; doi:10.5296/ber.v11i2.18491

Abstract:
Numerous theoretical and empirical studies have investigated the role of financial development, human capital accumulation, and trade liberalization on economic growth. Their findings, however, have been inconclusive as to which of these factors’ implementation should policy makers prioritize. We construct a panel of more than 160 `developed’, `developing’ and `less-developed’ countries between 1965 and 2017 to address this issue. We use non-stationary dynamic panel estimations to argue that quantitative effects of these factors depend on national income levels. Even though developed countries benefit the most from investing in their human capital and developing countries gain more by improving their financial institutions, our results show that both financial development and human capital are relatively ineffective in less developed countries. Nonetheless, trade liberalization has a stronger impact on GDP growth in these economies than in developing and developed countries.
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