American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy

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ISSN / EISSN : 1079-2082 / 1535-2900
Published by: Oxford University Press (OUP) (10.1093)
Total articles ≅ 30,463
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American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac249

Abstract:
Roflumilast is a phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 4 inhibitor. Class: 84:92 • Skin and Mucous Membrane Agents, Miscellaneous (AHFS primary) Brands: Zoryve®Roflumilast has the following uses: Roflumilast is available in the following dosage form(s) and strength(s): Cream, 0.3%: 3 mg of roflumilast per gram in 60-gram tubes. It isessentialthat the manufacturer’s labeling be consulted for more detailed information on dosage and administration of this drug. Dosage summary: For topical use only. Not for ophthalmic, oral, or intravaginal use. There are no randomized clinical trials of oral or topical roflumilast in pregnant women. In animal reproduction studies, roflumilast administered orally to pregnant rats and rabbits during the period of organogenesis produced no fetal structural abnormalities at doses up to 9 and 8 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD), respectively. Roflumilast induced post-implantation loss in rats at oral doses greater than or equal to 3 times the MRHD. Roflumilast induced stillbirth and decreased pup viability in mice at oral doses 5 and 15 times the MRHD, respectively. Roflumilast has been shown to adversely affect pup post-natal development when dams were treated with an oral dose 15 times the MRHD during pregnancy and lactation periods in mice.
, Tiba Al Sagheer, Monica Tadros
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac286

Abstract:
In an effort to expedite the publication of articles related to the COVID-19 pandemic, AJHP is posting these manuscripts online as soon as possible after acceptance. Accepted manuscripts have been peer-reviewed and copyedited, but are posted online before technical formatting and author proofing. These manuscripts are not the final version of record and will be replaced with the final article (formatted per AJHP style and proofed by the authors) at a later time. To review the pharmacology, efficacy, safety, dosing and administration, and place in therapy of asciminib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) used as a third-line treatment option for Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase. CML is a rare cancer caused by a chromosomal translocation that forms a fusion of the BCR and ABL1 genes on chromosomes 22 and 9. Until recently, patients for whom first-line treatment options failed were treated with TKIs that bind to the adenosine triphosphate–binding site on BCR-ABL1. However, because of similar mechanisms of action, there continues to be an unmet need in patients for whom at least 2 TKIs have failed or those with a T315I mutation unable to tolerate ponatinib. In October 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved asciminib (Scemblix), the first TKI specifically targeting the ABL1 myristoyl pocket (STAMP) via allosteric binding, as a third-line option for patients with chronic-phase (CP)-CML. Asciminib received accelerated approval due to meeting its primary endpoint at week 24, demonstrating a major molecular response rate of 25.5% for patients on asciminib compared to 13.2% for those receiving bosutinib. In addition, patients on asciminib achieved a higher rate of complete cytogenetic response at 40.8% compared to a rate of 24.2% for bosutinib. Clinicians prescribing asciminib should monitor for increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, hypertension, cardiovascular toxicity including ischemic and thromboembolic conditions, and decreased numbers of neutrophils and platelets, as these may require treatment interruption, dose reduction, or treatment discontinuation. Asciminib is a unique targeted TKI that provides clinicians with an additional third-line and beyond treatment option for adults with CP-CML regardless of mutation status as well as a second TKI treatment option for patients harboring a T315I mutation.
, Layla Kassem
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac287

Abstract:
Disclaimer: In an effort to expedite the publication of articles related to the COVID-19 pandemic, AJHP is posting these manuscripts online as soon as possible after acceptance. Accepted manuscripts have been peer-reviewed and copyedited, but are posted online before technical formatting and author proofing. These manuscripts are not the final version of record and will be replaced with the final article (formatted per AJHP style and proofed by the authors) at a later time.
, Andrew V Romero, Jeffrey F Barletta
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac283

Abstract:
Disclaimer: In an effort to expedite the publication of articles, AJHP is posting manuscripts online as soon as possible after acceptance. Accepted manuscripts have been peer-reviewed and copyedited, but are posted online before technical formatting and author proofing. These manuscripts are not the final version of record and will be replaced with the final article (formatted per AJHP style and proofed by the authors) at a later time.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac266

Abstract:
By combining geographic information system (GIS) technology with data from electronic health records, health registries, and other sources, clinicians can have a powerful tool to improve patient care, says geospatial pharmacy specialist Jing Wu. Wu is a former account executive at Esri in Arlington, VA, where she helped healthcare organizations incorporate GIS technology into their platforms. She said that by viewing patients through a GIS lens, pharmacists and other clinicians are better able “to think about our patients within the context of their lives [and] create more targeted interventions.” “I think that’s going to be the standard of practice,” Wu added. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describes GIS as computer-based tools for storing, visualizing, analyzing, and interpreting geographic data. The many things GIS data can map include disease cases, hospitals, clinic types and sites, roads, public transit routes, waterways, and land boundaries. CDC uses GIS data for research on population health, toxicology, chronic disease prevention, disease surveillance, and other health issues.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac264

Abstract:
Richard Francis Demers, who helped shape pharmacy practice at Penn Medicine’s Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for 3 decades, died suddenly August 11 at his home in North Wales, PA. He was 63 years old. Demers was a strong advocate for the development of innovative pharmacy practice models that meet the needs of a changing healthcare landscape. He was also an early proponent of the concept that pharmacists should demonstrate and document the value of their services and establish and maintain relationships with organizational leaders. From his earliest days as a pharmacist, Demers participated in and helped lead his state pharmacy organizations. In 1982, he was installed as second vice president of the New Hampshire Society of Hospital Pharmacists. He served a term as president of the Pennsylvania Society of Health-System Pharmacists (PSHP) in 2008 and was president of the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association in 2019. In 2010, PSHP honored Demers with the Sister M. Gonzales Duffy Lecture Award, which recognizes sustained contributions to health-system pharmacy in Pennsylvania.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac263

Abstract:
At UConn Health in Framingham, CT, the pharmacy residency program team used one of its bimonthly meetings as a creative way to counter the accumulated stress from operating a learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. “Instead of sitting there and discussing a leadership article or a new leadership technique that they could implement, we just forewent the scheduled discussion items and we played trivia,” said Kevin W. Chamberlin, university director of pharmacy residency program. “Everybody laughed, and it was just a way to loosen up at the end of a stressful run.” He said the program has also extended the creative approach to residents’ wellness by hosting virtual game nights, escape rooms, and other activities as alternatives to the in-person social events that were abandoned during the COVID-19 pandemic. But Chamberlin emphasized that stress management is serious business for the residency team, which has built education, monitoring, and resources into the workday to create a supportive and wellness-focused culture.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac265

Abstract:
The federal government has authorized pharmacists to prescribe nirmatrelvir/ritonavir, or Paxlovid, for the treatment of COVID-19—but there are pros and cons for health systems to weigh before establishing pharmacists as prescribers. Trisha Jordan, chief pharmacy officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, said that on the pro side, anything that expands her team’s scope of practice is proof of concept of the profession’s ability to take on advanced tasks that improve patient care. “The con the pharmacists are worried about—and to some level the physician leadership—is that they know we can’t take this all on,” Jordan said. “We don’t have the staff to evaluate all patients seeking care.” Jordan said her health system has reallocated pharmacists throughout the pandemic to position them where they’re most needed. Most staff members are back to their usual prepandemic duties, but some pharmacists have been assigned to perform Paxlovid consultations for ambulatory care practices.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac247

Abstract:
Oteseconazole is an azole antifungal agent. Class: 8:14.08 • Azoles (AHFS primary) Brands: Vivjoa®Oteseconazole has the following uses: Oteseconazole is available in the following dosage form(s) and strength(s): 150 mg of oteseconazole (fluconazole is not supplied in the carton). It isessentialthat the manufacturer’s labeling be consulted for more detailed information on dosage and administration of this drug. Dosage summary: Oteseconazole is contraindicated in females of reproductive potential, and in pregnant and lactating women. Based on animal studies, oteseconazole may cause fetal harm. The drug exposure window of approximately 690 days (based on 5 times the half-life of oteseconazole) precludes adequate mitigation of the embryo-fetal toxicity risks. Ocular abnormalities were observed in the offspring of pregnant rats dosed at 7.5 mg/kg/day during organogenesis through lactation in pre and postnatal developmental studies. The observed ocular abnormalities included cataracts, opacities, exophthalmos/buphthalmos, optic nerve/retinal atrophy, lens degeneration and hemorrhage. Ocular abnormalities occurred at doses about 3.5 times the steady state clinical exposure seen with patients being treated for RVVC. Advise patients that oteseconazole is contraindicated in females of reproductive potential, and in pregnant and lactating women because of potential risks to a fetus or breastfed infant.
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac272

Abstract:
This is a correction to: Philip J Schneider, MS, FASHP, FFIP, FASPEN, Craig A Pedersen, BSPharm., PhD, FAPhA, FASHP, Michael C Ganio, PharmD, MS, BCPS, BCSCP, FASHP, Douglas J Scheckelhoff, MS, FASHP, ASHP National Survey of Pharmacy Practice in Hospital Settings: Clinical services and workforce—2021, American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, Volume 79, Issue 18, 15 September 2022, Pages 1531–1550, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxac147
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