Tropical Plant Research

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 2349-9265 / 2349-1183
Published by: AkiNik Publications (10.22271)
Total articles ≅ 306
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DOAJ
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SHERPA/ROMEO
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Latest articles in this journal

, P. O. Ige, Q. A. Onilude, Z. T. Animashaun
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 609-618; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.075

Abstract:
This study was carried out to aid the prediction of tree slenderness coefficient using non-linear regression models for tree species in Omo Biosphere Reserve, Southwestern Nigeria. Systematic line transect design was adopted for the study. Three transects were laid with four plots on each transect at alternate positions which made a total of 12 sample plots (50 m × 50 m) in the study area. Diameter at breast height (DBH), diameter at the top, diameter at the middle and diameter at the base as well as total height and merchantable height of all trees were measured. Descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation and regression analysis were adopted for the study. The study showed that about 23.5% of the trees in the study area are susceptible to wind-throw damage. Correlation analysis revealed that DBH is a better predictor of Slenderness coefficient than other tree growth characteristics. Six non-linear models were adopted for the tree slenderness coefficient prediction. The best models were selected based on the highest Adj.R2, lowest AIC and SEE values. Normal logarithmic equation SLC = 30.72 + (-41.21) In(D) was selected as the candidate model for the pooled data. The same candidate model (Natural logarithm) was selected for both the Desplatsia lutea and Strombosia pustulata species with the equation SLC = -0.04 + (-63.82) In(D) and SLC = 22.12 + (-51.40) In(D) respectively while exponential model with equation SLC = 170.94e(-1.93) was selected for Sterculia rhinopetala. These equations were recommended for predicting slenderness coefficient for each of the tree species in Omo Biosphere with apparently valid potentials for enhancing reasonable quantification of the stands’ stability.
, V. Jayalakshmi, S. Khayum Ahammed, N. Kamakshi
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 634-637; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.079

Abstract:
The growth and yield characters of chickpea varieties suitable for mechanical harvesting were evaluated through field experiment conducted for three consecutive years (2016__17 to 2018__19) during rabi season on vertisols under rainfed conditions at Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nandyal, Andhra Pradesh. The investigation was carried out in split plot design with three replications. Two plant geometries (30.0 × 10.0 cm and 22.5 × 10.0 cm) were assigned to main plots and six chickpea varieties (viz., GBM 2, Dheera, CSJ 515, HC 5, Phule G 08108 and BRC 1) were assigned to sub plots. Pooled analysis of experimental results indicated that significantly higher number of branches per plant (8.7) and number of pods per plant (31.1) and test weight (24.3 g) were observed under 30.0 × 10.0 cm when compared to 22.5 × 10.0 cm. Higher plant height (44.8 cm), height of lowest pod bearing branch (30.0 cm), lower days to 50 % flowering (42.1 days) and higher test weight (31.2 g) were observed in Dheera. Higher number of branches per plant (9.2) and number of pods per plant (34.2) were observed in GBM 2. Higher seed yield was observed in Phule G 08108 (1708 kg ha-1) which is followed by GBM 2 (1675 kg ha-1) Dheera (1569 kg ha-1) and BRC 1 (1493 kg ha-1). Higher harvest index (56.4%) was also observed in Phule G 08108. Chickpea varieties GBM2, Dheera and BRC1 were best suitable for mechanical harvesting and higher seed yield due to their excellent morphology.
Laxminarayan Sonawane, Shiv Colony Vanyajeev Sanrakshan Sanstha, Prasad Sonawane, Mayuresh Kulkarni
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 619-621; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.076

Abstract:
Zingiberaceae is a family of monocotyledonous plants consisting of about 50 genera with a total of about 1600 known species of perennial herbs with tuberous rhizomes, distributed throughout tropical and sub-tropical forests. India has rich diversity of Zingiberaceae plants with nearly 200 of the world taxa occurring here. In Maharashtra 11 genera and around 40 species under this family are found in wild and cultivated state. Satpuda hills of Khandesh are lesser known for their wild Zingiberaceae members with only 5 species recorded in earlier floristic studies of the region. Present paper deals with the addition of Zingiber roseum to the flora of Jalgaon district and Khandesh region. The present record of Z. roseum is only the second record of this species from Maharashtra. The study provides a detailed taxonomic description, photographs and relevant information of above-mentioned plant species.
, M. Venkaiah, J. Swamy, J. Prakasarao, Deccan Regional Centre Botanincal Survey Of India
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 594-603; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.073

Abstract:
Amaryllidaceae plants are collectively called as Amaryllids, majority are ornamentals, beyond beauty they also boon for perfume, vegetables and medicine. They are playing a key role in horticulture as ornamental plants, used for decoration in all kinds of ceremonies and florists often used in bouquets. The present paper deals with 19 species belonging to 10 genera and key to the species, brief description, Flowering and fruiting period, locality, economic importance, photographs etc. were provided.
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 689-695; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.087

Abstract:
The lichen genus Dibaeis is currently represented in India by two species, viz., Dibaeis baeomyces and Dibaeis pulogensis reported from the states of Meghalaya, Sikkim and Western Bengal. The present study describes the occurrence of a new record Dibaeis absoluta from the Eastern Himalayan hill tracts of Mizoram, North-East India which is situated in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot. The addition of present new record of Dibaeis species further increased the number to three in India. A revised key is also provided.
, T. Taufikurahman
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 654-668; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.083

Abstract:
Mangroves are a diverse group of highly salt-tolerant woody plants, which grow in the inter-tidal zones in tropical and subtropical latitudes. Despite its unique services to the people, coastal and marine systems, mangroves have become one of the most rapidly disappearing ecosystems in the world. This paper reviews the available information on distribution, current status and challenges of mangroves in Sri Lanka. Today, around 160 km2 of mangrove vegetation is available in Sri Lanka and distributed mainly in Jaffna, Batticaloa, Kalpitiya, Rekawa and Trincomalee and is composed of 21 species of true mangroves and 24 species of mangrove associates. Mangroves in the island have been adversely affected due to the numerous anthropogenic activities, including land reclamation, tourism, coastal aquaculture and agriculture and other industrial activities etc. Proper conservations of mangroves are urgently required to the island to avoid further decline of mangrove ecosystem. It is imperative to evaluate policies, legal instruments and development strategies to effectively protect this valuable ecosystem.
Farha Rehman, Sumaira J. Khan, Iram Khan Tahir, Azra Shaheen
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 638-644; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.080

Abstract:
The nature of the soil is a very important factor in the growth and development of a crop. Crop plants suffer a decline in growth and yield, when exposed to the saline condition. Pea considers one of the main leguminous crops, due to its ability to produce significant quantities of protein, carbohydrates and nutrient-rich seeds. Plants were subjected to four salt treatments, 4, 8, 12 and 16 mmhos cm-1 of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate and the biomass and biochemical responses were measured. All growth attributes such as stem, root and leaf fresh and dry weight decrease with the increased salinities doses. Salt treatments were no significant effects on the biomass and quantitative changes in starch, protein and soluble sugar in seeds of pea. But it was noted that the starch contents were much reduced in 16 mmhos cm-1, the salinity level of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate as compared to control. The protein content and sugar content value were increased in a higher concentration of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate, when compared to control in Pea, CV. Azad P-1. The proline content increased with salt stress up to 8 mmhos cm-1 in CV-Azad P-1. It was also observed that the high dose of sodium sulfate is declined biomass and quantitative changes in starch, than that of sodium chloride solution in pea seeds.
, Rajesh Kumar
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 650-653; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.082

Abstract:
The specimen was collected during the rainy season in June, 2018 from Botanical garden Rain Forest Research Institute, Jorhat. Morphological characters of the specimen were recorded in the field and micromorphological characters were studied in the laboratory under the optical microscope. After a thorough examination of the specimen and its spores and capillitial threads, it is confirmed that the specimen is wild edible puffball named Calvatia craniiformis belongs to family Agaricaceae. It is also ensured after consultation with available literature that Calvatia craniiformis is the first report in North-East India.
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 684-688; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.086

Abstract:
Carbohydrates were analysed in 40 species of marine macroalgae belonging to three classes collected at seasonal intervals between April 2018 to March 2019 from the intertidal habitats in Gulf of manner coastal regions.Among the 40 dominant seaweeds 11 species belonged to Chlorophyceae, 13 species to Phaeophyceae and the remaining 16 species to Rhodophyceae. The carbohydrate content of seaweeds varied from 4.50±0.12 to 72.25±3.15 % of DW during the summer season. The percentage of carbohydrate content was maximum in Gracilaria verrucosa (72.25±3.15 % of DW) during the summer season and minimum in Turbinaria ornata (4.50±0.12 DW) during the summer season. The carbohydrate content of seaweeds varied from 5.50±0.17 to 48.38±3.04 % of DW during the pre-monsoon season. The maximum values were observed in Gracilaria corticata var. corticata the minimum content was observed in Padina pavonica. The carbohydrate content of seaweeds varied from 4.83±0.12 to 58.18±4.56 % of DW during the monsoon season. The maximum value was observed in Gracilaria corticata var corticata and the minimum was in Padina pavonica. The carbohydrate content of seaweeds varied from 7.36±0.16 to 67.25±2.41 % of DW during the post-monsoon season. The maximum value was observed in Acanthophora spicifera and the minimum content was observed in Sargassum ilicifolium.
U. N. Uka, E. J. D. Belford
Published: 31 December 2020
Tropical Plant Research, Volume 7, pp 696-701; https://doi.org/10.22271/tpr.2020.v7.i3.088

Abstract:
The roadsides of the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana are lined with the several species of trees, such as, Terminalia catappa, Mangifera indica, Ficus platyphylla and Polyalthia longifolia. The people use them for their health care needs. The vehicle emissions results in oxidative injury in these plants, due to the production of reactive oxygen species. The present study assessed the antioxidant potential of leaves of these tree species subjected to vehicular pollutants. The free radical scavenging activity of leaf extracts of the four tree species were measured using 1, 1- diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH). The total phenolic content (TPC) of the extract was determined by a spectrophotometric assay using the Folin-Ciocalteau’s reagent. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured using Phosphomolybdate assay. In this study, the medicinal properties of leaves of Terminalia catappa, Mangifera indica, Ficus platyphylla and Polyalthia longifolia sampled from the control sites showed better medicinal properties. DPPH scavenging activity at concentration 2.7 ug ml-1 was lower at the arterial road sites in all the four tree species. A higher DPPH percentage inhibition was recorded at the control sites. The IC50 values were higher for the leaf sample extracts from the arterial road sites and lower for the Control site. The total phenolic content of leaf samples of all the four tree species at the arterial road sites were lower than and significantly different from those at the Control site (p=0.000). The TAC values were lower at the arterial road sites in comparison to the control sites. There was a significant difference among the arterial road sites and also when compared with the control (P<0.05). It could be suggested from this study that variability exists in the antioxidant activities of plants due to a decrease in the medicinal properties of plants subjected to constant auto vehicular pollution.
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