Review of European Studies

Journal Information
ISSN / EISSN : 1918-7173 / 1918-7181
Total articles ≅ 1,057
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Nguyen Duc Hanh, Pham Van Thuan, Vu Quynh Loan
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n4p1

Abstract:
Studies here are the to determine effects of the quality accreditation to a training program on aim, teaching method, test and assessment methods and content, outcomes to students. Consider the fields and the professions, skills and attitudes that the curriculum must address to support graduate outcomes for students. Analyze the challenges for higher education leaders to appropriate industry requirements and the effects on faculty perceptions and capacity to design a transformative educational program for students. Comparing the difference between a curriculum only has concentrated on meeting requirements and follows quality accreditation standards with a curriculum focus to experiment for students. A case study for universities in Australia and Vietnam have been considered, compared and recommended.
Paige Dou
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p87

Abstract:
Reviewer Acknowledgements for Review of European Studies, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2021.
Bishnu Prasad Dahal
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p76

Abstract:
This paper aims to identify the significance of Sindoor or Vermilion powder (red in color) in Hindu cultural custom and in Hindu society. Sindoor is given to bride by groom on the occasion of marriage. Sindoor is given the gift by the groom to the bride in between the hair partings of married Hindu women have begun to start on the day of the marriage ceremony and the married woman. After then she considered as the wife of her husband and enters to the matrimonial life. Use of Sindoor in Hindu marriage practices signify socially culturally and even medically to order the gender disequilibrium society through the symbolic interpretation of cultural item and traditions, values, norms that are interwoven by religious bind with the member of Hindu orthodox society to sustain the patriarchal social structure. Sindoor also signify the hierarchy among the women world and the status changes when an unmarried wears a Sindoor in Hindu Society
Priscilla Southwell, Kevin Pirch
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p57

Abstract:
This research examines the rapid growth in popularity of Iceland’s Pirate Party (Piratur) by analyzing recent election results and public opinion polling (2013-17) on the popularity and ideological placement of the Pirate Party. We find that most respondents viewed the Pirate Party as centrist, and the majority of the respondents were neutral in their view of the party, although negative assessments rose by 2017.
Adel Bogari
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p63

Abstract:
The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that attract Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs) to Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs) and Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Countries (SEMCs). To this end, this paper tested three variables representing public governance, physical infrastructure and macroeconomic quality, over a ten-year period stretching from 2008 to 2017. The results of the regressions estimated on CEE countries show that entrepreneurs are attracted to this region mainly for governance and infrastructure quality. Macroeconomic policy variables seem to attract less FDIs to these countries. Using aggregated  variables, the results of the regressions estimated on SEMCs show that the governance variable becomes statistically significant but retains a low value. The other variables of physical infrastructure and macroeconomic policies seem to be more robust and better explain FDI inflows to this region.
Gila Cohen Zilka
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p31

Abstract:
Immigration of adolescents involves multiple, many-faceted changes. This study examined the experience of absorption of adolescents in Israel, in the digital age, through the eyes of mentors who work with them, from the mentors’ social-emotional perspective of themselves and of their students. In this mixed-method study, 122 mentors completed questionnaires with closed and open-ended questions, and wrote extensively about their difficulties. The findings show that most mentors (66%) worked hard to make their students part of the social fabric. Some of the mentors (34%) encountered problems resulting from misunderstandings and poor communication because of language difficulties and lack of control over pragmatic aspects in a sociocultural context. They strove to raise social awareness in the adolescents through observation, and to provide tools for reading and responding to behaviors, all the while encouraging social involvement. Mentors thought that digital environments helped them and the adolescents in their coping. Thanks to digital environments, especially smartphones, adolescents were able to blend into their new environment. Translation, databases, numerous applications, and groups on social networks respond to their needs and help with difficulties they encounter in real time, creating a sense of social connection and belonging.
Osnat Akirav
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p14

Abstract:
This study analyzes the use of legislative and non-legislative tools, which has rarely been done simultaneously. I collected data about the frequency of use of legislative tools (presenting and passing legislation) and non-legislative tools (making one-minute speeches, written and oral parliamentary questions and motions for the agenda) in five countries: the US, the UK, Canada, Australia and Israel. The results confirm my three hypotheses. Legislators from Australia, the UK and Canada use fewer legislative tools because their use is more constrained than in the US and Israel. Legislators use more semi or unconstrained tools that involve publicity than those that simply appear on the record. Finally, opposition members use more non-legislative tools while government members use more legislative tools. However, the degree of constraint on the use of the tool moderates this finding. The study provides a comprehensive understanding of the legislators' strategic use of legislative and non-legislative tools. 
Yeshwant Naik
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p7

Abstract:
Human rights dimensions of the Covid-19 response escalate the obligations of governments. Since the time Covid was first identified in December 2020 in Wuhan, China, Human Rights Watch has reported several human rights abuses including the authoritarian responses in some countries.  Many governments are expanding public health measures by abandoning universal human rights. People are arrested for violating lockdown measures and curfews. Police and/or security forces are using violence, including lethal force, to enforce public health measures such as curfews and the wearing of masks. Lockdowns have imposed restrictions on individual movement by restraining them from leaving their place of residence. Some countries have imposed partial lockdowns. While restrictions on freedom of movement are necessary in the interest of protecting public health, states still are accountable to ensure that such restrictions are proportionate, evidence-based, and time-limited.  There were grievances and inequalities across countries, some of which were based on racist, gender-specific or other discrimination. There is also increased oppression of those who think differently. The pandemic exposes the failures in the context of political action and cooperation. The article makes recommendations on how governments can confront the pandemic while respecting basic human rights.
Bisong Anthony Etta, Oko Bernard Atrogor, John Eteng Imoke, Achu Regina Anyungwu, Owor Effiom Owor
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n3p1

Abstract:
The study examines the factors of age, gender and location of social studies students and their performance on a virtual classroom platform. The study adopted the quasi-experimental design. A specific class arm of 50 Junior Secondary School (JSS) 3 students that were treated to a social studies lesson on family. The researcher developed a Social Studies Achievement Test (SSAT) with a reliability coefficient of .861; Cronbach Coefficient Alpha Statistics was administered to elicit student performance. The data collected were grouped based on age, gender and location. Mean (X ) score analysis indicated variance in performance based on personal factors, but, there was no significant correlation with academic performance of social studies students when taught using a virtual classroom platform, It was concluded that age and gender significantly influence students' academic performance in social studies using virtual classroom platform. The state government and education stakeholders adopted a virtual classroom strategy and teachers should be trained to use virtual classroom platforms for instruction for optimum educational effect in the study area.
Paige Dou
Review of European Studies, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.5539/res.v13n2p134

Abstract:
Reviewer Acknowledgements for Review of European Studies, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2021.
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