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Results in Journal Vol. 52, Issue 2: 40

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Simon Jeffery, Tony Lynas-Gray, Ron Hilditch
Published: 28 December 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.56956aa8

Emily Moravec
Published: 15 December 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.53f6dcad

Abstract:
Creating a website to promote one’s scientific work has become commonplace in many scientific disciplines. A plethora of options exist for framework to generate your website content, hosting it, and registering a domain name. The goal of this document is to provide early career scientists (1) an overview of the current options for creating a website to promote their professional persona, and (2) general advice concerning website written content and one’s web presence. To get a sense of how other scientists created their websites, I created a survey asking colleagues about the services they used to create their websites and advice they have for someone creating a website. I received 54 responses from 53 astronomers and one computer scientist of which 23 were in an academic position beyond postdoc (faculty, scientist, etc.), 1 was an individual research fellow, 4 were in their third postdoc, 4 were in their second postdoc, 16 were in their first postdoc, and 6 were graduate students. I report the results of this survey here.
Randall K. Smith
Published: 15 December 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.9b7fdbfa

Abstract:
Modern science is a communal affair, with researchers joining into groups of all sizes for a single project or perhaps a career-long endeavor. Each field has its own standards and norms of practice, driven by history and funding patterns. Astronomers, broadly defined here to include astrophysicists, planetary scientists, heliophysicists, and physicists involved in astronomy, have an extremely long history and an eclectic funding pattern that includes private donors, government grants, and multi-national funding.
Michaël Gillon, Victoria Meadows, Eric Agol, Adam J. Burgasser, Drake Deming, René Doyon, Jonathan Fortney, Laura Kreidberg, James Owen, Franck Selsis, et al.
Published: 2 December 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.afbf0205

Abstract:
The upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) combined with the unique features of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system should enable the young field of exoplanetology to enter into the realm of temperate Earth-sized worlds. Indeed, the proximity of the system (12pc) and the small size (0.12 R ) and luminosity (0.05% L ) of its host star should make the comparative atmospheric characterization of its seven transiting planets within reach of an ambitious JWST program. Given the limited lifetime of JWST, the ecliptic location of the star that limits its visibility to 100d per year, the large number of observational time required by this study, and the numerous observational and theoretical challenges awaiting it, its full success will critically depend on a large level of coordination between the involved teams and on the support of a large community. In this context, we present here a community initiative aiming to develop a well-defined sequential structure for the study of the system with JWST and to coordinate on every aspect of its preparation and implementation, both on the observational (e.g. study of the instrumental limitations, data analysis techniques, complementary space-based and ground-based observations) and theoretical levels (e.g. model developments and comparison, retrieval techniques, inferences). Depending on the outcome of the first phase of JWST observations of the planets, this initiative could become the seed of a major JWST Legacy Program devoted to the study of TRAPPIST-1.
Forrest Mozer, Jean Brodie, James Overduin
Published: 11 November 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.33281d8c

Bob Marcialis, Faith Vilas, Lisa Prato, Lynn Hayden
Published: 20 October 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.d309cee8

Kenneth Johnston, Stephen Maran
Published: 2 October 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.4afb3708

Abstract:
Hobbs was a pioneer in the studies of the cm-mm radio emission and polarization of solar system, Galactic and extragalactic sources in the period 1960-1990. He became Branch Head of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in 1976, where he guided investigations across the EM spectrum.
Michael J. Kurtz, Roman Chyla, The ADS Team
Published: 22 September 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.8d12c399

Abstract:
Second Order Operators (SOOs) are database functions which form secondary queries based on attributes of the objects returned in an initial query; they can provide powerful methods to investigate complex, multipartite information graphs. The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has implemented four SOOs, reviews, useful, trending, and similar which use the citations, references, downloads, and abstract text. This tutorial describes these operators in detail, both alone and in conjunction with other functions. It is intended for scientists and others who wish to make fuller use of the ADS database. Basic knowledge of the ADS is assumed.
Kevin Krisciunas
Published: 16 September 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.2e0ebf9a

Abstract:
Osterbrock worked as a “computer” at Yerkes Observatory and contributed significant time and effort to a variety of historical projects and archives, especially the Mary Lea Shane Archives of the Lick Observatory.
Ted Dunham
Published: 10 September 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.a08df10c

Abstract:
Jim Elliot performed numerous groundbreaking occultation studies, including the first occultation observations with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and the discovery of Uranus' rings.
Constance Walker, Jeffrey Hall, Lori Allen, Richard Green, Patrick Seitzer, Tony Tyson, Amanda Bauer, Kelsie Krafton, James Lowenthal, , et al.
Published: 25 August 2020
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.346793b8

Abstract:
In May 2019 SpaceX launched its first batch of 60 Starlink communication satellites, which surprised astronomers and laypeople with their appearance in the night sky. Astronomers have only now, a little over a year later, accumulated enough observations of constellation satellites like those being launched by SpaceX and OneWeb, and run computer simulations of their likely impact when fully deployed, to thoroughly understand the magnitude and complexity of the problem. This research informed the discussion at the Satellite Constellations 1 (SATCON1) workshop held virtually 29 June to 2 July 2020 and led to recommendations for observatories and constellation operators. The SATCON1 report concludes that the effects on astronomical research and on the human experience of the night sky range from “negligible” to “extreme.”
Christopher Munch
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.331d8c78

Abstract:
Münch conducted research in infrared radiometry for NASA’s Mariner, Viking, and Pioneer planetary probes, and made important contributions to the understanding of galactic structure, solar physics, and stellar atmosphere theory.
Geoffrey Chester
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.bf43c4bd

Abstract:
Born in 1940 in Ohio, Slabinski developed an interest in science at an early age. As one of the world’s leading experts on the orbital mechanics of satellites, his work in USNO’s Earth Orientation Department provided critical support to the Global Positioning System (GPS).
Hugh M. Van Horn, Earl Scime, D. J. Pisano, Maura McLaughlin, Duncan Lorimer
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.2d670f52

Abstract:
Littleton was a professor of physics at West Virginia University, where he played a key role in the expansion of astronomical research and establishing its strength in radio astronomy. His research interests included solar physics and late-type stellar atmospheres.
Emma Carleton, Kevin Krisciunas
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.528399f4

Abstract:
A long-term employee of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Nat Carleton's proudest achievement was his involvement in the design and construction of the MMT telescope at Mount Hopkins, Arizona.
Nicole Vassh, F.X. Timmes
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.082fb169

Abstract:
A symposium to honor the late pioneer. This event celebrated her life and science through short talks from her colleagues and collaborators as well as researchers who have benefited from her trailblazing and scientific insights.
Cynthia Bauer-Levy, Deborah Gabriel
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.7a765940

Abstract:
Bauer was the first professionally trained astronomer at Penn State, where he organized the first undergraduate program in astronomy. His most important scientific work led to a complete revision of the assigned ages and past history of meteorites and asteroids.
Pierre Bergeron, John Glaspey, Hugh Van Horn
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.706f1887

Abstract:
Wesemael was an expert in stellar-atmosphere theory as applied to very hot, high-gravity stars, publishing important works on the properties of white dwarfs. His honors included the Herzberg Medal and the Rutherford Memorial Medal in Physics.
David DeVorkin
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.a83e494f

Abstract:
Alexander Gurshtein (1937–2020) grew up Jewish in Moscow admist the turbulence of Stalinist rule and World War II. He become deeply involved in lunar cartography for the Soviet space program as well as archaeoastronomy. He emigrated and taught at Mesa State College until 2010.
Pierre Bergeron, John Glaspey
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.c06890d4

Abstract:
Gilles Fontaine (1948–2019) was awarded for his pioneering, world-renowned work in theoretical and observational studies of white dwarf stars and the late stages of stellar evolution.
Tim Tackett, Spencer Olin, Keith Nelson, Sally Hufbauer
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.8afa3ad4

Abstract:
Karl served as a faculty member at the University of California, Irvine from almost its very beginning, and was interested in the conditions and considerations that inspire some scientists to venture outside the familiar ground of their own disciplines.
David Blewett, Thomas Burbine
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.f33a5382

Abstract:
Jeff Bell was primarily known for his research on the Moon and asteroids, including the 52-color Survey and the introduction of the K-type asteroid taxonomic class.
Katelyn Horstman, Virginia Trimble
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.907653b3

Abstract:
To explore whether gender bias has an effect on publication times, we looked at the elapsed time from submission to acceptance, \Deltat, for female and male first authors submitting to the Astrophysical Journal. For the years 1998 and 2018, around 4000 papers were collected and analyzed to determine first author gender and \Deltat. On average, papers with women as first authors take two weeks longer to be accepted for publishing than papers written by their male counterparts. Although we do not believe a week is a long enough elapsed time to give female authors a disadvantage, it shows that there are gender discrepancies within astrophysics that need to be addressed. We hope by collecting voluntary demographic data from first authors publishing to astrophysical journals that biases such as these can be resolved.
Virginia L. Trimble
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.4b7c948d

Abstract:
AAS honorary member Lodewijk Woltjer was the third director general of the European Southern Observatory, President of the International Astronomical Union, and a founder and the first president of the European Astronomical Society.
Sarah C. Beck
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.30458ae7

Abstract:
Gail Anne Reichert died Sunday the 21st of August, 2016. She was a leader in the international collaboration that in the early 1990s pioneered the reverberation mapping technique for measuring the emission regions of active galactic nuclei.
Patrick Seitzer
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.e86e0460

Abstract:
Peter was an internationally recognized expert on the history of telescopes and binoculars, and served on the Executive Committee of the Historical Astronomy Division from 2005-2007. He was a frequent attendee and presenter at HAD sessions at AAS meetings.
Megan Donahue
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.2947723a

Abstract:
Edwin Loh was a professor at Michigan State University for 31 years, where he took a deep interest in undergraduate education and teacher training.
Kevin Krisciunas
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.00e8b40d

Abstract:
Paul Hodge, an expert in the subject of nearby galaxies, was born on November 8, 1934, in Seattle, Washington.
Bruno Leibundgut
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.b881786b

Abstract:
Gustav Tammann died on Sunday the 6th of January 2019. Gustav Andreas Tammann, a pillar of 20th century astrophysics, has passed away at the age of 86. During his long and successful astronomical career, he made seminal contributions to extragalactic astrophysics and cosmology.
N. Brickhouse, G. J. Ferland, S. Milam, E. Sciamma-O'brien, A. Smale, A. Spyrou, Phillip Stancil, L. Storrie-Lombardi, G. M. Wahlgren
Vol. 52, Issue 2, Volume 52; https://doi.org/10.3847/25c2cfeb.10bdb63d

Abstract:
This report provides detailed findings on the critical laboratory astrophysics data needs that are required to maximize the scientific return for NASA's current and near-term planned astrophysics missions.
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