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Results in Journal Social Psychological Bulletin: 80

(searched for: journal_id:(1403425))
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Ewa Skimina, Dominika Karaś, Ewa Topolewska-Siedzik, Maria Kłym-Guba, Klaudia Ponikiewska, Radosław Rogoza, Eldad Davidov, Jan Cieciuch
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15, pp 1-33; doi:10.32872/spb.3029

Abstract:
Experience sampling is considered one of the best methods for measuring behavior (Furr, 2009, https://doi.org/10.1002/per.724). When used for this purpose, it requires a coding system to transform diversified reports on what people are doing, provided as responses to an open-ended question, into interpretable data. We present a categorization of everyday behaviors that can be used to code responses from experience sampling and diary studies conducted with different groups of participants—from adolescents to elderly people. This categorization was developed and validated on a set of 19,840 responses to an open-ended question about participants’ recent activity, provided by 667 persons ranging in age from 12 to 66. As a result of the multistage work, we present a categorization system which forms a hierarchy from three broad categories to 97 narrow ones through middle levels of five, 23, and 63 categories of behaviors. The possible usage of the developed categorization is discussed.
John Nezlek
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15, pp 1-19; doi:10.32872/spb.2679

Abstract:
The present paper provides an overview of diary style research. This includes descriptions of different methods and the types of research questions for which they are appropriate. Data analytic methods are described and some recommendations are provided. Recommendations regarding the preparation of manuscripts describing the results of diary studies are also provided.
Evelina De Longis, Guido Alessandri
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15, pp 1-21; doi:10.32872/spb.2975

Abstract:
Emotion dynamics, how people’s emotions fluctuate across time, represent a key source of information about people’s psychological functioning and well-being. Investigating emotion dynamics in the workplace is particularly relevant, as affective experiences are intimately connected to organizational behavior and effectiveness. In this study, we examined the moderating role of emotional inertia in the dynamic association between both positive and negative emotions and self-rated job performance among a sample of 120 Italian workers (average age 41.4, SD = 14), which were prompted six times per day, for five working days. Emotional inertia refers to the extent that emotional states are self-predictive or carry on over time and is measured in terms of the autocorrelation of emotional states across time. Although inertia has been linked to several indicators of maladjustment, little is known about its correlates in terms of organizational behavior. Findings revealed that workers reporting high levels of positive emotions and high inertia rated their performance lower than workers high in positive emotions, but low in inertia. In contrast, the relation between negative emotions and performance was not significant for either high levels of inertia or low levels of inertia. Taken together, these results suggest the relevance of investigating the temporal dependency of emotional states at work.
Caroline Zygar-Hoffmann, Sebastian Pusch, Birk Hagemeyer, Felix D. Schönbrodt
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15, pp 1-37; doi:10.32872/spb.2873

Abstract:
Motivational variables are considered fundamental factors influencing the occurrence of behavior. The current study compared different types of motivational variables (implicit and explicit motive dispositions, motivation as states and as aggregated person-level variables) in their ability to predict communal and agentic behavior reports in intimate relationships. 510 individuals completed measures of dispositional communion and agency motives and participated in a dyadic experience sampling study with five assessments per day across four weeks. They reported on their momentary communal and agentic motivation, as well as on their own and their partner’s behaviors. All examined types of motivational variables predicted certain behavior reports on the between-person or within-person level and had incremental effects beyond the other motivational variables in at least one motive domain. Directly replicating and conceptually extending prior research, the effects of motivational states and their aggregates were consistently found across behavioral outcomes, across self- and partner-reports and across the motive domains of communion and agency. Using the example of motivational states, the general value of assessing within-person variables for psychological phenomena in ESM-designs is discussed.
Thuy-Vy Nguyen, Jonathon McPhetres, Edward L. Deci
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15; doi:10.32872/spb.2663

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Aleksandra Cisłak, Marta Pyrczak, Artur Mikiewicz, Aleksandra Cichocka
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15; doi:10.32872/spb.2645

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Matthias Keller, Mirella Walker, Leonie Reutner
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15; doi:10.32872/spb.2643

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Clara Kulich, Soledad De Lemus, Pilar Montañés
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 15; doi:10.32872/spb.2667

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Janusz Grzelak
Social Psychological Bulletin, Volume 14; doi:10.32872/spb.v14i4.2307

Abstract:
Poland in 1988 was on the edge of economic, social and political collapse. The two antagonistic entities – the communist party and the government on one side and the Solidarity movement on the other - were each too weak to overcome the crisis by itself. Undertaking negotiations appeared to be the last chance to solve the crisis peacefully. There was a number of external circumstances and opportunities that supported undertaking the Talks, including Michail Gorbachev's perestroika in the East, Ronald Reagan's anti-communist policies in the West, the support of the Catholic Church and the support of the vast majority of Polish society. The whole Round Table story can be viewed as a transformation from a zero-sum game to a cooperative non zero-sum game with the solution close to a Pareto optimal solution. The processes included, among others: concentration on problems rather than people; building a mutual trust; creating the idea of the common good; and partitioning negotiations into many teams thereby creating a decision-making structure that was both hierarchical and flexible. After thirty years, both democracy and the rule of law are at stake again in Poland. Unfortunately, however, it does not seem that today’s socio-political situation is capable of fostering negotiation methods for solving the nation’s problems.
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