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Paul Riermaier, Williams Bandoma, Sue Gagnon, Janet Marler, Sandra Standish, Victoria Turner
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 11-17; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7602

Abstract:
Weeding is a systematic approach to the removal of resources from a library’s collection. In the weeding process, materials are identified for withdrawal in order to maintain a collection that is accurate, updated, well-used, meets the needs of the users, and is in line with the library’s mission. When weeding tangible resources that are part of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP), a depository library must ensure that its weeding policy follows the Legal Requirements & Program Regulations of the Federal Depository Library Program and any separate guidelines set by the Regional Depository. However, there are no specific rules or guidelines to follow when weeding digital FDLP resources. This means that individual libraries have more leeway to craft digital weeding procedures that best serve their institution, patrons, and the community at large. In this article, we will discuss initial considerations when developing a process for weeding digital depository materials, we will examine different methods for analyzing a digital collection’s size and usage, and we will review methods for maintenance and weeding of digital resources.
Carl P. Olson
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 5-6; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7600

Abstract:
This report is one of the first of a series on the gray zone, a “carrier concept” for hostile action, preceded by a long game of diplomacy, threats, and propaganda to achieve warlike aims without full-scale warfare. It owes a good deal to the British Royal Army’s General Rupert Smith, author of a 2005 best-seller, The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World.
Valerie D. Glenn, Laurie Aycock
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 7-10; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7601

Abstract:
Through the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP), the Government Publishing Office (GPO) provides materials published by government agencies to designated libraries in the United States and its territories. In return, these libraries offer free, public access to the materials in their depository collections. The state of Georgia has 23 federal depository libraries—one Regional and 22 Selectives. All but two of these libraries are affiliated with academic institutions, and the majority are part of the University System of Georgia (USG).
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 2-3; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7598

Abstract:
Last year I published an editorial about voting during the pandemic, contrasting states trying to make voting more accessible, with states that were fighting efforts to enable ways citizens could vote safely. Unfortunately greater voting access is under more attack now. The Brennan Center for Justice noted as of March 24th, “361 bills with restrictive provisions in 47 states. That’s 108 more than the 253 restrictive bills tallied as of February 19, 2021—a 43 percent increase in little more than a month.” This is very disappointing, and once again my home state of Texas is restricting access, trying to ban methods of voting that local officials allowed during the pandemic in last year’s general election. The Texas Senate recently passed Senate Bill 7, which would limit extended early voting hours, prohibit drive-thru voting, and make it illegal for local election officials to proactively send applications to vote by mail. Here’s hoping the Texas House will stand up to the Texas Senate and not restrict the ways citizens of Texas can vote. I think it also demonstrates that the U.S. Supreme Court was premature in its 2013 Shelby County v. Holder ruling removing the requirement that states with a history of racial discrimination in voting get pre-clearance from the Justice Department before making changes in voting procedures. With so many states trying to restrict voting, and limit the powers of election officials, the U.S House has passed H.R. 1, For the People Act of 2021, in early March. This bill addresses voter access, election integrity and security, and more. Hopefully this will pass the U.S. Senate and allow the citizens of the United States the right to vote without undue burdens.
Emily Alford
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 18-20; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7603

Abstract:
In recent years, the opioid crisis across the United States has influenced the research of many professional fields. Widely known as a first stop information source for analysts and professionals in the medical and public health worlds, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) gathers and presents extensive data on prescription rates and overdose numbers to the public. However, the opioid crisis is a collective matter. It holds cause and effect economically, environmentally, and socially. This article explores resources developed by federal departments outside of HHS, which provide useful data and information relevant to their fields on such impacts. Departments such as Agriculture, Education, Labor, Housing and Urban Development—even the General Services Administration—make available statistics both the public and researchers can access to learn more about the effects of this crisis.
Lynda Kellam
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i2.7599

Abstract:
I hope you are all enjoying the warming weather (or at least making the best of it). By the time this issue is published, I imagine that I will have spent several days sitting on my porch or hanging out at a gorge. I can’t wait. I also hope by the time you are reading this that most, if not everyone, has been able to get vaccinated.During the past year, in addition to efforts to grow our membership, the leadership of GODORT has endeavored to retain a sense of community through a difficult time. Our Friday chats have been successful with a wide range of topics from government documents in the news to a discussion of the Mapping Prejudice Project. While we may not be able to sustain the pace of the chats indefinitely, I hope we can continue to come together informally in between conferences.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 2-3; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7532

Abstract:
To make democracy representative, our electoral process contains two related concepts: “electoral equality”—an individual’s vote should count the same as every other individual’s vote, and “representational equality”—elected representatives should represent approximately the same number of people.
Elizabeth Psyck
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 9-11; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7537

Abstract:
In the fall of 2018, I was asked to calculate the value of Grand Valley State University’s (GVSU) general collection (defined as everything except Special Collections and University Archives) as part of risk mitigation planning and updating insurance coverage. Records indicated that our collection’s value was last calculated 11 years earlier, and we lacked both written documentation and institutional memory regarding the process used to calculate that value. While there is a fairly significant body of knowledge around calculating the value of monographs, I struggled to find guidance on calculating the monetary value FDLP collections. There is a robust body of scholarship on promoting the intrinsic value of being a member of the FDLP to library administration and other stakeholders, but very few of them focus on detailed financial benefits of tangible collections.
Megan Graewingholt
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 5-6; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7534

Abstract:
Change, often said, is inevitable, while growth is optional. Originating in Government Documents, Laura Baker, User Experience and Assessment Librarian, has witnessed considerable change in her career and in the library profession. After more than twenty years at Abilene Christian University (ACU) Library, her position has grown to embrace assessment, promote library technology, and support accessibility of government documents through digitization.
Dominique Hallett
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 7-8; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7536

Abstract:
On September 1, 2020, LLMC, a non-profit Minnesota-based consortium of law libraries, launched the open-access portal RIGHTS! (http://www.llmc.com/rights/home.aspx). If you are looking for primary materials such as current constitutions, human/civil rights acts, Non-Governmental Organizations’ websites, advocacy organizations, and other resources specifically dealing with injustices regarding marginalized parties, this is the place to look. Their stated mission is preserving legal titles and government documents, while making copies inexpensively available digitally through its on-line service, LLMC-Digital (http://www.llmc.com/about.aspx). The original intent was to focus on primarily US and Canadian sources, as seen by the dropdown navigation on the left of the site, but the site also includes other international sources. The page opens at the “Civil and Human Rights Law Portal—Global,” which includes links to various government organizations, judicial information, non-governmental organizations, research and education resources and various documents from different countries. The RIGHTS! site can also be reached through the parent page (http://LLMC.com) with the link to RIGHTS! Located in the right-hand column. The RIGHTS! Portal is sponsored by the Vincent C. Immel Law Library at Saint Louis University.
Lynda Kellam
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7533

Abstract:
The following were the Chair’s remarks at the GODORT General Membership Meeting on January 14:Welcome GODORT members, guests, and hopefully some future members. My name is Lynda Kellam. I am the Chair of GODORT and in my daily life the Senior Data Librarian at the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research. I begin this meeting by acknowledging that Cornell and Ithaca, NY are located on the indigenous lands of the Cayuga Nation and we recognize the indigenous peoples who have and continue to live here. I have a few prepared remarks and I know this might be unprecedented in GODORT, but I hope you will have patience with me as I believe this is necessary.
Gwen Sinclair
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 7-7; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7535

Abstract:
Fans of comics and cartoons will revel in the creative deployment of characters from the funny pages throughout Constitution Illustrated. Artist R. Sikoryak is a contributor to The New Yorker and The New York Times Book Review and is the author of several illustrated books. In his latest work, he has concocted an ingenious ploy to enliven the text of the Constitution. Each page features a different section of the Constitution being recited by cartoon characters. Sikoryak has imitated the style and borrowed the characters of dozens of cartoonists. Readers will find favorites both classic and contemporary, from Bud Counihan’s Betty Boop and Chester Gould’s Dick Tracy to Alison Bechdel’s Dykes to Watch Out For and Harvey Pekar’s American Splendor. Aficionados will have fun figuring out the artist being imitated on each page, and a helpful index provides a key to the source of each drawing for those who aren’t able to recognize the myriad cartoonists represented.
Andrew Lopez
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 18-24; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7539

Abstract:
There is no question that libraries of all sizes, no matter how small, have an important role to play in preserving and facilitating the discovery of government publications. This is especially true for documents issued at the state and local level, precisely because they are less-well known nationally and therefore less likely to be included in larger national digitization projects. By focusing on what might as well be called small government publications, little libraries and small selective depository libraries can enter the digitization arena by undertaking small-scale digitization projects that, despite their diminutive scale, can achieve digital preservation successes in the range of minor to major. For inspiration, we should recall the hero of Robert Walser’s now celebrated novel from 1909, Jakob von Gunten, who adopts the motto “To be small and to stay small.”
Lorri Mon
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 49, pp 12-17; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v49i1.7538

Abstract:
In 2020, a pandemic of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus struck worldwide, rapidly becoming the most devastating since the 1918 global influenza pandemic. As librarians confronted entirely new challenges in how to safely manage libraries during the COVID-19 crisis, a common question was, “what happened in libraries during the 1918 influenza pandemic?” This article explores that question through the lens of government documents and news articles of the 1918-1921 time period, seeking to understand what happened then in libraries nationwide, and what we might learn from it today.
Kenya Flash, Dominique Hallett
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 7-8; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7475

Abstract:
This is the final installment of stories and tales as told by government information professionals as part of the “Who are ‘We the People’?” survey conducted by Kenya Flash and Dominique Hallett. We would like to thank you for joining us on this journey through the stories from those in the trenches. We hope you have recognized yourselves in some, giggled and/or shaken your head at others, and overall, simply enjoyed these tales. Our pilot survey has provided us with so much insight and information, but these stories really cut to the heart of our profession and what it is like being a government information p8rofessional. Thank you for your time and your tales.
Lynda Kellam
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 4-4; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7473

Abstract:
Dear GODORT Members,I am excited to serve as the chair of GODORT for this year. And what a year to serve! For those unfamiliar with me, I am the senior data librarian at the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, where I’ve been since July 2019. Before that, I was the data and government information librarian at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) for fourteen years. At UNCG I was the Federal Library Depository Program selective depository coordinator and, while I no longer work directly with documents, I remain committed to the use, preservation, and continuity of access to government information.
Anna L. Price
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 28-32; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7479

Abstract:
Government oversight of the food supply chain consists of a complicated regulatory framework involving multiple executive branch agencies, congressional committees, and state governments. The agencies primarily involved with food safety issues are the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Although the above entities divide responsibility for different aspects of food safety and quality, according to a 2019 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, the patchwork of statutes and regulations has led to “inconsistent oversight, ineffective coordination, and inefficient use of resources.”
Megan Graewingholt
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 5-6; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7474

Abstract:
Many readers may recognize Julia from her role as author of the “Get to Know” column, writing articles on GODORT members and their work in Documents to the People since 2008. Reflecting on her work, Julia reported that the best aspect of writing the “Get to Know . . .” column was meeting the amazing people in the library community and learning from their research projects. Having experience in a number of industries, from working in a publishing house to being a high school teacher, Julia believes that librarians are the most supportive community of professionals. “While we all work with government information, there’s a lot of people doing a lot of different things,” says Stewart. If there was a new or emerging trend, like digitization, interviewing colleagues provided an opportunity to reach out and learn from other professionals in the field.
Tori Stanek
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 20-27; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7478

Abstract:
In December 2019, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) approved an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Schedule DAA-0567-2015-0013 request for disposition of detainee records that included sexual assault and abuse allegation information. Despite receiving a record number of objections, NARA did not change the temporary status of the documents in question. This essay examines ICE record creation and NARA record handling policies, as well the Freedom of Information Act’s role in the transparency of both entities.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 2-3; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7472

Abstract:
This is our student paper issue and I would like to thank all the professors who submitted papers this year: Emily Rogers, Andrea Morrison, and Jennifer Morgan. I would also like to thank the editorial board for all their hard work this year reviewing articles. Well done everyone!
Michelle M. Bessette
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 13-19; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7477

Abstract:
The Department of Defense (DoD) operates the largest employer-sponsored child care in the nation. For Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and more, the Military Child Care Act (MCCA) of 1989 was enacted to establish law-mandated standards for all branches. Providing high-quality, available child care to service members helps maintain a mission ready force. Before the passing of the MCCA, the services’ child care programs were tainted with poor oversight, deplorable conditions and child abuse scandals detailed in GAO reports and congressional hearings. Investigations and legislative activity leading up to the passing of the MCCA, which became law under the National Defense Authorization Act of 1990 and 1991, forced the DoD to take responsibility for a new breed of service members—the military family.As a military spouse with children and employee of the DoD who co-supervises a child development center (CDC), I understand the importance of the MCCA and am able to witness DoD’s investment in their military families. The history of abhorrent conditions has all but vanished, due in part to public access of government publications. The timeline of this legislation in combination with nongovernment publications helps tell the story of the how the military model of child care became one in which the civilian sector strives to accomplish. My decade long career of federal service, my desire to be more knowledgeable of the original MCCA and my interest in military history inspired my research. My intended audience are those unfamiliar to military child care and those who may not understand the needs and sacrifices of our nation’s military families.
Jim Church
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 9-12; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7476

Abstract:
An added benefit of doing library instruction is you learn things from students and faculty. This knowledge informs both collection development and research consultations. It is especially interesting when a new faculty member arrives and issues a revised syllabus for a popular course. One such class at UC Berkeley is in the Global Poverty and Practice (GPP) minor, founded by Professor Ananya Roy ten years ago. Her book, Poverty Capital: Microfinance and the Making of Development, makes the uncomfortable point that people and institutions profit from poverty: it is a lucrative business. But there are also those who attempt to create and influence “poverty knowledge.” The 1998 subtitle of the World Bank’s flagship publication, the World Development Report, was “Knowledge for Development.” In 2017 the World Bank wrote a feature news article (about itself) as a “knowledge institution.” There are articles that trace the history of the World Bank’s vision of itself as a “knowledge bank,” a term I find both amusing (do they charge “interest”?) and problematic. Yet a library is also a knowledge institution, and what we purchase or recommend influences the thinking and research of students and scholars.
Marissa Rydzewski
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 33-38; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i4.7480

Abstract:
On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) characterized the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. Two days later, the US president declared a state of emergency in Proclamation No. 9994. One of the many problems that arise with a public health crisis is the shortage of essential medical supplies like ventilators, masks, and hand sanitizer. When these items become scarce, some businesses or entrepreneurs try to inflate their prices to make a higher profit when they know they can still sell these necessary items. These high costs on goods during disasters or emergencies can seem unfair and make it difficult for those who need them able to afford them. During these stressful times, it’s important for Americans to recognize and report price gouging when they suspect fraudulent activity when purchasing items. Where do people find the authority on anti-price gouging laws? Typically, it is each state’s responsibility, however, in times of crisis, the federal government could also do what is necessary to protect the public interests. This paper will assist people in understanding what price gouging is, how to recognize when price gouging is occurring, and how to report it. Additionally, this paper will address what responsibility the federal government has to protect Americans from price gouging schemes in times of crisis and what it is currently implementing to prevent these fraudulent actions.
Tom Adamich
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 10-11; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7420

Abstract:
When I first received a gracious invitation to examine The Sum of the People: How the Census has Shaped Nations, from the Ancient World to the Modern Age, I have to admit I was a bit skeptical as to author Andrew Whitby’s intent to talk about the census as both a concept and an historical narrative spanning a timeline, as the subtitle indicates, “from the Ancient World to the Modern age.” Would the work be just another brief commentary on our current US 2020 Census, or would it digress into a study of enumeration as a tool used by statisticians to merely count human bodies and their geographic location—lacking a human narrative or historic context?
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 2-5; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7415

Abstract:
The coronavirus has disrupted one of the foundations of our democracy—voting. Several states delayed primaries during the shut-downs. Now states are expanding, or hindering, voting options so that citizens may vote safely during this pandemic. Pew Research polled registered voters and found that 63 percent were uncomfortable voting in person because of the coronavirus outbreak. Unfortunately how citizens can vote safely during this time is falling along partisan lines.
Kenya Flash, Dominique Hallett
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 25-30; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7423

Abstract:
At the fall 2017 Federal Depository Library Program conference, a chance conversation regarding government information librarians’ average salaries evolved into a survey to learn who is working with government documents. In the course of the conversation, it became apparent the roles and duties of government information professionals were shifting. After some consideration, the authors determined that the best course of action would be to ask government information professionals about their perceptions of who they are and what they consider the future of government information librarianship to be.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 31-31; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7424

Abstract:
WHEREAS, the American Library Association (ALA) and the academic library community lost a valued member on April 5th, 2020, with the death of Peter Leo Kraus . . .
Lynda Kellam
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 7-7; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7417

Abstract:
Favorite spot in Ithaca, New YorkMy favorite spot is my second floor porch looking out over the Fall Creek neighborhood. It is just a great place for people watching. I also love Ithaca Falls and Six Mile Creek. So much natural beauty here.Favorite pastime/hobby I am a big music fan so I guess my hobby is listening to music and collecting records. And yes I still have CDs. :) But my real hobby should be finishing my PhD. At least that is what my advisor would say.
Amanda Wakaruk
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 12-17; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7421

Abstract:
The public domain status of US federal government works has been a point of envy for librarians working in Commonwealth countries for more than a century. Absent of the constructed barriers of copyright controls, anyone is able to freely reproduce, share, and build upon US federal government publications. This results in greater distribution, and thus greater visibility and impact, for the expertise of federal employees including scientists, policy analysts, and statisticians. It also helps prevent copyright chill, which occurs when legitimate rights are not exercised due to a fear of infringement, real or imagined.
Susanne Caro
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 6-6; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7416

Abstract:
The last few months have been mentally and emotionally draining for many of us. The murder of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and too many others at the hands of police and the lynching of Ahmaud Arbery has rocked the nation. Protests for justice are met with more police violence.
Carl Olson
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 10-10; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7419

Abstract:
The “Brown-Water Navy” in Vietnam gained fame by numerous books, such movies as Apocalypse Now, and the Presidential candidacy of Senator John Kerry, a “swift-boat” veteran. Commendably, this compact and lavishly illustrated history begins with an executive summary of riverine operations from the French Indochina War to the withdrawal of the United States Navy in the 1970’s. Subsequent chapters describe the major campaigns, milestone by milestone.
Kenya Flash, Dominique Hallett
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 8-9; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7418

Abstract:
Here are more stories and tales as told by government information professionals as part of the “Who are ‘We the People’?” survey conducted by Kenya Flash and Dominique Hallett.
Ben Chiewphasa
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 18-24; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7422

Abstract:
Preparation for an imminent volcanic eruption relies on strategic communication between experts and the general public, ongoing scientific research and monitoring, and government assistance. Should one falter, lives are at stake at the most critical moment, whether it involves inescapable pyroclastic flows or perhaps plane engine shutdown from volcanic ash. Throughout history, legislative concerns surrounding volcano hazards have been built around the notion of proactiveness, yet financial and resource support oftentimes reflect a tendency towards reactiveness. The following document examines the legislative evolution of volcano hazards mitigation that has extended its reach well into 2020. In addition, an overview of the United States Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards will be followed by an evaluation of government databases for finding historic and current volcanic data and information.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 35-36; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7426

Abstract:
“What a great project—I know I’ll be passing this information along to my colleagues!” “I wish I had thought of that research topic!” “I wouldn’t be where I am today if not for his mentoring and support!” “Wow, she knows everything about GODORT!”
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 32-34; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i3.7425

Abstract:
Report of the GODORT Cataloging Committee Virtual ALA Annual Meeting
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 10-12; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7335

Abstract:
A method to evaluate a library’s government information collection using OCLC’s WorldCat is described. By searching material type codes for government publications, and limiting the search to an owning library, it is possible to find the number of cataloged government publications in a library’s collection. The system can be used to identify the age of government publications in a library, the number of items on a given subject, and find publications on a topic from a specific time period. This method of analysis is especially useful for analyzing government information collections when publications are cataloged into a library’s main collection. The search technique can be used to generate statistics on government publication collections which can be used to prepare reports on library collections and materials.
, Dominique Hallett
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 8-9; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7334

Abstract:
Many and wondrous are the tales told by government information professionals of their interactions with these boundless sources of information. This discovery was made as Kenya and Dominique were compiling information from the recent for “Who are we the people” survey. In the survey conducted in late 2018-early 2019 we included the following question:Tell us your favorite government documents/government information story. If you would like your name to be included with your story, please include it here, otherwise your story might be published as an anonymous story from the survey.
Sandy Staebell, Sue Lynn McDaniel
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 13-20; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7336

Abstract:
Government documents librarians, special collections librarians and museum curators should collaborate. When they do, researchers and students benefit. While government documents tend to report the beginning and the end of the political process, political ephemera, artifacts and manuscripts provide a deeper understanding of what happens in between. Knowledge of readily available political collections equips information specialists to better serve users. Our survey reveals several U.S. academic institutions that provide online access to significant political collections. A close examination of the Rather-Westerman Political Collection at Western Kentucky University demonstrates how some university-held political collections are created, utilized and further developed.
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 3-3; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7331

Abstract:
Greetings Members! The New Year is typically a time of reflection, looking at the past year and evaluating the good and the bad. This has been one heck of a year for government information; the National Science Foundation brought us the first image of a black hole, the Mueller Report was one of the most eagerly awaited publications of the year, and United Nations Climate Change Conference reports have called the world to action. At the state level California banned plastic straws, Washington State tightened gun safety regulations, New York strengthened renter’s rights, and more states either legalized or decriminalized marijuana. It has been difficult to keep track of it all.
Government Documents Round Table
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 24-24; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7338

Abstract:
In the accompanying document, text to be removed is indicated by strike though. Proposed new text is bolded and underlined.Purpose:To provide a clearer, more accurate definition of Task Forces, Interest Groups, and Discussion groups.To clarify the roles and differences between Task Forces, Interest Groups, and Discussion groups.To allow Interest Groups to have a voting member on steering.
Government Documents Round Table
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 25-29; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7339

Abstract:
A draft of the 2020 revisions to GODORT's bylaws.
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 4-5; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7332

Abstract:
Think about a disaster that you have never experienced personally or that occurs in other areas but not where you live. For me, that is a wildfire. Now, imagine that the only available information is in a language you cannot read or understand. For my first few years living in Puerto Rico that was me.
Kristina Hall
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 21-23; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7337

Abstract:
This article describes a copyright review program at HathiTrust which sought to determine the copyright status of individual US state government documents. The copyright project was carried out from 2014 to November 2019, and more than thirty-five people from different institutions took part.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 2-2; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7330

Abstract:
Howdy everyone! It is 2020 and Census Day is April 1, 2020. There are many changes with the Census this year. Census 2020 will be the first census that people can respond to online. Sometimes people are not sure where to be counted (for example people in shelters and college students) and the Census Bureau has been working on this issue since 2015 (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/2020-census/about/residence-rule.html). For more information check out the 2020 Census Operational Plan—https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/decennial-census/2020-census/planning-management/planning-docs/operational-plan.html.
Heather Christenson
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 48, pp 6-7; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v48i1.7333

Abstract:
I am pleased to have this opportunity to update GODORT and DttP readers on the progress of the HathiTrust U.S. Federal Documents Program.As of this writing in December 2019, HathiTrust includes close to 1.4 million U.S. federal documents digitized from print. Our top contributors are the University of Michigan, the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, and the University of Minnesota. The collaborative nature of our aggregate contributions is powerful—our collection includes digital volumes from 51 different institutions and from the Technical Report Archive & Image Library (TRAIL).
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 47, pp 28-33; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v47i4.7215

Abstract:
Publicly-traded companies have reporting and disclosure requirements set by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which includes the public disclosure of financial statements and an annual 10-K report. In contrast, privately-held companies most often do not meet the SEC filing requirements, and therefore, are not required to disclose financial information. For investors and business researchers, this can provide clear challenges for researching privately-held companies. This paper first highlights a sample of the significant legislation and rules affecting disclosure requirements of public and private companies. Then, it offers other government sources for company and industry financial information. Finally, it suggests further resources to educate business owners, investors, and business researchers.
Laura Sare
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 47, pp 2-2; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v47i4.7209

Abstract:
To continue the legal theme set by the cover photo contest, I am often called on by colleagues to teach strategies for finding legal resources in library instruction sessions. Legal databases and legal materials are often perceived as foreign and overwhelming to undergraduate students as compared to other scholarly resources. Teaching legal materials also often includes having to give a brief overview of the legal system so students understand what types of materials are available to them. When demonstrating how to find legal materials I demonstrate case law relevant to the curriculum in the class, but I find that an active learning session helps reengage the students who are needing a break. I have a collection of “fun laws” for students to find and briefly read so that I know they have learned basic searching techniques. I break down these session to search for case law by citation and by case names.
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 47, pp 21-27; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v47i4.7217

Abstract:
This paper provides an overview of the legislative history of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA), known popularly as McCain-Feingold. It will also explore the challenges to the act in the courts. The paper will conclude with a review of access to campaign finance reports resulting from the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. With a rich legislative history that spans several Congresses as well as a history of judicial interventions which have shaped the law as it stands today, it is pertinent that the American people have access to information associated with the law so as to better understand the federal election process and assess its strengths and weaknesses in advance of the 2020 elections.
Spencer Bowman
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 47, pp 17-21; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v47i4.7214

Abstract:
This paper will explore how information played an important role in the history of the Hanford site. Looking closely at Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Energy (DOE), and other government agency publications and documents will bring more insight into the effects on the environment and how the government has handled the situation throughout its operations. This paper will also add non-governmental perspectives on the issues presenting news reports and evidence that call attention to the problems.
Mark Chalmers
DttP: Documents to the People, Volume 47, pp 10-10; https://doi.org/10.5860/dttp.v47i4.7212

Abstract:
Coal is a readily combustible rock of carbon and hydrocarbons that is found all across the United States. Due to its combustive properties and relative abundance, burning coal has been and still is a substantial fraction of the US energy market. However, also due its combustive properties, coal veins and mines tend to, well, catch fire. Lewis and Clark reported seeing burning veins of coal in 1805 when they were exploring the Missouri River in what is now central North Dakota. Maybe you have heard of the still burning mine fire in Centralia, Pennsylvania where a strip mine has been burning since 1962 and could continue to burn for over 250 years. Abandoned coal mines that catch fire are serious health, safety, and environmental hazards that the US government has been trying to address for decades.
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