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Results in Journal Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health: 33

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Rattana-Umpa Narida, Tanwatthanakul Jirawon, Sota Churaporn, Santiboon Toansakul Tony
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 042-050; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001034

Abstract:
To investigate the variables correlation analysis research method for assessing the caregivers’ perceptions in two groups including dependent and independent variables to correlate the measuring of early childhoods. Typically, in correlated data, for jointly normally distributed data with relevant outliers that can use a correlation as a measure of a monotonic association. Designing the 65-paired samples for the Thai Model of early detection and intervention of children as the health care system guidelines from 26-CUPs have compared. Using the DSPM divided into 65-appropriate and 65-inappropriate development early childhoods for every 13 CUPS that depends on talented children. Selecting the Receptive Language (RL) skills identified in contributing growth relative factors with four research instruments: the EPRLS, PRLF, CNRLF, and CMRLF are valid and reliable significantly. Comparisons of the appropriate and inappropriate early childhoods are differences ( < .05), the intercorrelation circumflex nature analysis (p < .05), positively. The R2 values show that 26% and 55% of the variance in training caregivers’ factor skills on the PRLF, CNRLF, and CMRLF to the EPRLS in inappropriate and appropriate early childhoods, respectively. Developmentally Appropriate Practice is a perspective in a child’s development: social, emotional, physical, and cognitive-based on the child’s cultural background: community, family history, and family structure.
Tanwattanakul Jirawon, Pairojkul Sriveing, Kamnuansilpa Peerasit, Sritanyaratana Wanapa, Santiboon Toansakul Tony
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 033-041; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001033

Abstract:
According to raising teenage parents though their abusing and neglecting children at a rural community with the ethnographic qualitative research method was surveyed. All children have protected on violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation from their teenage parents. To investigate and emphasize the consequences of violence ranged from immediate to the impact of their development on physical injury, learning ability, and local child care performance to long-term harm that caregivers carry into adult life is affected for raising children. Administration to the 89-households’ families and household memberships, 10 house stakeholders, 8 community leaders, 36 children, 65 caregivers, teenage parents and grandparents, and 3 mentors. Using the ethnographic qualitative research participatory with observation, natural conversation and in-depth interviews were randomized in rural Northeastern Region, Thailand. There are 52% of children being sexually, physically, or psychologically abused, neglected per day. Most of the teenagers’ education is poor learning skills, low academic learning achievements, and independent freedom of their sexual behaviors. These sexual intercourses between their groups are normal. Adding gambling habits among friends and adult groups are amputated without parents to dissuade. Either lifestyles as freely with sexually and gambling and the basic education are stopped, experiences’ living skills are poorly. Teenage women are changed to pregnant and young mothers. The teenage men must be searched for the job without a lack of worker’s skills to look for children with whom they are conflicted family relationships to take care.
La Shapovalova, Ka Shapovalov, Pk Shapovalova
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 025-032; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001032

Abstract:
Introduction: In accordance with the requirements for the preparation of a report, a physician must provide information on scientific research in the following sections to obtain a qualification category of a specialist: 6. Scientific and practical work (participation in scientific and practical conferences, medical scientific societies, presentations, publications); 11.2. List of publications of the attested in scientific journals and collections, abstracts and 11.3. List of speeches at international, all-Russian and republican conferences. Material and methods: The analysis of 5 qualification works of a psychiatrist (1997, 2002, 2008, 2013 and 2018) for the scientific component as part of the mandatory requirements for the processing of documents when they are submitted to the Attestation Commission on the assignment of a qualifying medical category in psychiatry . The depth of the study was 24 years. When working on the material, the following methodical approaches were used: system, complex, dynamic, normative, quantitative and situational. Methods of analysis included: historical, analytical and comparison. For the analysis, methods were used: groupings, absolute values, continuous and selective observations. Results: The psychiatrist GAUZ “KDC” independently or in co-authorship published 223 scientific and educational-methodical publications (total volume of 182.65 conventional author’s sheets), including 90 scientific (39.81) and 143 educational-methodical (142.84) works, in including one monograph and eight textbooks (two of them with the stamp of the Ministry of Education of the Russian Federation). In the e-library (www.e-library.ru) of the Russian Scientific Citation Index (RINC): publications - 31; citations - 123; Hirsch index - 3, publications in the journals of the VAK - 13. (https://elibrary.ru/author). Discussion: The scientific work of a practicing outpatient psychiatrist is assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively, the integral indicator of the psychiatrist’s own participation in each publication of 0.78 conventional printed sheets can be considered as a serious personal contribution to scientific research. In the regulatory framework of indicators and requirements for registration of the report there is no synchronization in the daily work of a practical doctor, his job duties with the statements of the report. When concluding an employment contract with the employer, there is no mention in it that the doctor should engage in scientific work, and it is an integral part of his functional duties and qualification requirements. The scientific work does not mention the “Unified qualification directory of positions of managers, specialists and employees, the section “Qualification characteristics of the positions of employees in the field of health care” for a psychiatrist. Conclusion: The attitude to the Administrative Regulations on the provision of a public service for assigning a qualification category to specialists engaged in medical and pharmaceutical activities should be reviewed in terms of synchronization with the duties of a doctor. The Regulation on the compulsory conduct of scientific research should be introduced, substantiated and provided by the employer or be excluded from the administrative regulations as an independent section and be exclusively recommendatory in nature. Publications of physicians in scientific journals and collections, theses of reports should motivate their interest, and within the limits of the possibilities of the medical institution to have reasonable financial support, fixed in the employment contract. An example of a practical doctor who speaks at international, all-Russian or republican congresses, congresses and conferences is an important indicator of his professional growth, an incentive for the disclosure and development of the potential of the medical institution team and the result of proper administrative and organizational-methodological guidance. The scientific work and publications of a psychiatrist’s practical doctor should be a weighty additional argument in favor of a positive decision on awarding the qualification category he has declared.
, Mobeen Sehrish
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 022-024; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001031

Abstract:
The use of Information Technology (IT) has made our live comfortable at present however, it has also generated certain health concerns. The disproportionate exercise of IT, with indication to accessible literature, has been consistently interrelated with psychopathological indications counting the problems of aggression as well. Although this issue was not much focused in Pakistan, this study was planned to determine the connection among the expenditure of IT and aggression in Pakistani youth. The query incorporated 200 conveniently chosen Pakistani youth between 16 to 24 years of age from 4 cities. The Aggression Scale of Buss & Perry was used along with a demographic information questionnaire. The study was hypothesized that among Pakistani youth elevated utilization of IT would be positively correlated with higher levels of aggression. It was significantly proved by the results that elevated utilization of IT is positively and significantly correlated with aggression. The findings of this study may be helpful to psychologists, counsellors, parents and teachers in diagnosing problems of the Facebook generation.
Gómez Elena, Guzmán Marianela,
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 018-021; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001030

Abstract:
Introduction: Psychiatric emergencies constitute between 1% - 10% of general emergencies in Spain, of which a quarter will end up being hospital admissions. There is little literature on patients who are referred from general to specialized hospitals. Methods: Cross-Sectional study of all the patients referred in 2018. Sociodemographic variables and clinical variables, such as diagnosis and discharge destination, were analyzed. An analysis was performed by comparing means with the Chi Square test. Results: 433 derived emergencies were analyzed. Most of the patients were women. The main reason for derivation were suicide attempts. Of those patients, 40% required hospitalizations. More than 50% of the derived emergencies were referred to the home and followed up on an outpatient basis. Conclusion: Most derived emergencies are referred to the home after evaluation. This implies that most are not life-threatening and that with adequate tools for evaluating suicide risk, we could avoid transfers and improve the resolution of these cases.
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 014-017; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001029

Abstract:
The fact that general practitioner (GP) or psychiatrist understands the psychosocial effects of prescribing on the doctor-patient relationship is as important, if not more so, than knowing pharmacology. Any prescription of drugs modifies the doctor-patient relationship. Drugs, especially psychotropic drugs, act on symptoms and change thoughts, feelings, and behaviors; they can create both physical and psychological dependency; they can discourage a deep search for real solutions, both on the part of the doctor and the patient; they can affect the doctor’s access to the patient and the problem will be out of their reach. Psychotropic drugs can make the effect of the doctor in himself as a drug more difficult, favor an insignificant or problematic or little human relational context, where the GP/psychiatrist does not delve into the true meaning of the symptoms, and the patient tends not to get involved, to make an emotional withdrawal, to be passive before the prescribed drug, and can result in the chronification and structuring of functional symptoms that become organic, with lack of cooperation of the doctor and the patient, and paradoxically with over-compliance or therapeutic discontinuity and the lack of pharmacological adherence, absences to appointments or delays or cancellations of visits, and the denial of responsibility of both the doctor and the patient.
Germanovna Dmitrieva Elena
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 004-013; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001028

Abstract:
Psychopatia is a borderline between mental diseases and good health. One of its versions is mosaic psychopatia. For certain everyone knows, that the mosaic represents. These are the parts of diverse elements collected together. And so this disease is named after the patient shows signs of several types of psychopatia at once. It is known that Historic figures such as Ivan Grozny, Hitler, Stalin, Putin and other dictators have suffered from this disease.
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 5, pp 001-003; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001027

Abstract:
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had affected both developed and developing countries too. The first case in Nepal was confirmed on 23 January 2020. It was also the first recorded case of COVID-19 in South Asia. Nepal reported its first COVID-19 death on May 16. At the end of October, the number of death stood 937 and 1126 on 9 November. In September and October, deaths doubled, and with winter setting in, fatalities may skyrocket. Among the total CP cases in Nepal nearly 50% are from the Capital Kathmandu. So, Kathmandy is the new epicenter of COVID-19 in Nepal. There are no proper community-based isolation centres and ICU beds are also still limited. Due to increasing trend of COVID-19 cases and death people have fear of psychological stress. A study shows at least one symptom of psychological distress whereas 32% suffered from two or more symptoms of psychological distress such as restlessness, fearfulness, anxiety and worry and sadness. Despite limited resources, the government’s major challenges are early diagnosis, management of confirmed cases, contact tracing, and implementing some public health measures to reduce the infection’s transmissibility.
Husain Waqar, Mobeen Sehrish
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 4, pp 084-086; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001026

Abstract:
The present study was designed to measure the relationship between the consumption of Information Technology (IT) and anxiety among Pakistani youth. The inquiry included 200 conveniently selected Pakistani youth aged 16 to 24 years from 4 cities. The anxiety subscale of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale was administered along with a demographic information questionnaire. It was hypothesized that higher use of IT would be positively correlated with higher levels of anxiety among Pakistani youth. The results significantly supported the hypothesis, and it was established that the excessive use of IT is positively and significantly correlated with anxiety. The results are consistent with similar studies carried out in countries other than Pakistan.
Werkua MekonnenD, Necho Mogesie, Belete Asmare, Mekonnen Werkua
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 4, pp 076-083; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001025

Abstract:
Background: Alcohol and chat use during adolescence is associated with academic and health problems, including abuse or dependence in adulthood. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and early initiation of alcohol and chat use among school-going adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed with 546 school-going adolescents. The ACE International Questionnaire (ACE-IQ) was used to assess ACEs, Alcohol and chat use was assessed by questions prepared by the authors. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between overall ACE score and alcohol use and the potential moderating effects of confounders. Results: prevalence of chat chewing behavior was 26.6% followed by alcohol use 20%. A total of 66.2% of participants reported at least one ACE, and 5.93% reported four or more ACEs. High/Multiple ACEs (ACEs=1-3 and above 3) were significantly associated with increased alcohol use behaviors (AOR=1.491(1.072-3.078) and (AOR=3.171(1.330-7.560) respectively and increased chat use behaviors by 4.92 times (AOR=4.92, 95%CI=2.640-8.432) and 11.022 times (AOR=11.022, 95%CI=1.230-25.560) respectively controlling other factors. Conclusion: ACEs were significantly associated with risk behaviors, alcohol and chat use may lead to poor health, and educational outcomes among adolescent students and numbers of ACEs have graded association. Social support, sex, residence, parent educational status, and current level of depressive symptoms were significant modulating factors, which parents, school teachers, psychologists, and adolescent health care providers should give the concern to decrease the effect on school-going adolescents.
Benjelloun Roukaya,
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 4, pp 073-075; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001024

Abstract:
The expansion of social media platforms has given birth to a specific professional category in charge of « sanitizing » social media and keeping it free of “inappropriate” content. These content moderators, as a result of being constantly exposed to potentially traumatic images, may be at risk of developing stress-related symptoms. Here we present the case of a social media content moderator who experienced intrusive images, anxiety symptoms and insomnia. Literature about this subject is very scarce, while the need is increasing to assess this phenomenon and set up strategies of monitoring, counseling and treating this category of workers. Key points The expansion of social media platforms has given birth to a specific professional category: content moderators. As a result of being constantly exposed to potentially traumatic images, content moderators may be at risk of developing stress-related symptoms. The need is increasing to assess this phenomenon and set up strategies of monitoring, counseling and treating this category of workers.
, Ei Idrissi Slitine Nadia, Rabou Maoulainine Fadl Mrabih
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 4, pp 070-072; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001023

Abstract:
WHO declared the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, caused by SARS-CoV-2, to be a pandemic on March 12, 2020. In Morocco, the first case was reported in March 2nd 2020. The mental health of general population, medical and nursing staff especially has been greatly challenged. The aim of the present article is to explore the stress status of medical and nursing staff associated with exposure to the COVID-19. The medical staff was asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire anonymously. In University Hospital Mohamed VI, in Marrakesh, Morocco. During May 2020. In total, 120 valid questionnaires were collected. Among them, there were 57 residents (47,5%), 30 internes (25%), 22 nurses (19%) and others: medicine students and technical staff. The age was between 23 and 60 years. 15% of professional lived alone, 85% with their family, 74% lived with an old person or with a person having a chronic disease. In our study: the severity of symptoms in 36% of the asked professional, deaths among health professionals in 15%, death of a family member in 14%, the rapid spread of pandemic in 90%, the lack of knowledge in 83%, and finally contamination risk especially if comorbidity associated in 2%. Further risk factors: feelings of being inadequately supported by the hospital in 42%, fear of taking home infection to family members or others in 80%, being isolated, feelings of uncertainty and social stigmatization in 43%. The psychological presentation was the nightmare 19 in %, the insomnia in 48%, the somatization in 18%, the irritability in 22%, the aggressiveness in 14%, the nervousness in 70% and the drowsiness in 5%. During the vulnerability of the individual’s conditions during and after the COVID-19, psychological intervention should be done and a mental health support for the health professional.
Jobman Justine, , Koehler Ann, Struwe Leeza, Wells Wendy
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 4, pp 042-045; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001017

Abstract:
Introduction: Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg m-2) is epidemic globally and is associated with increased risk for a wide range of physical and mental health comorbidities. This is a particular concern for rural residents who have a greater rate of obesity than urban residents, but are disadvantaged in obtaining care because of a shortage of health care professionals. Community health fairs provide an opportunity for rural residents to receive health care services and education at reduced or no cost. Therefore, this study explored the role of community health fairs for providing health services and improving the health of residents in a rural community where obesity is a serious health concern. Methods: This study involved a retrospective longitudinal analysis of data collected during community health fairs conducted in a rural western Nebraska, USA community during 2014, 2015, and 2016 (n = 83). The Planned Approach to Community Health (PATCH) framework was used to target health education in this rural community. This approach involved 1. Mobilizing the community (via health fairs), 2. Collecting and organizing data (from consented attendees), 3. Selecting health priorities (obesity), 4. Developing a comprehensive intervention (nutrition and physical activity education), and 5. Evaluating the effectiveness of the framework (declines in measures of obesity over time). Analyses characterized BMI, percent body fat, visceral fat, and BP and explored differences between genders. The sample was recruited by advertising with flyers for health fairs at the College of Nursing. Most booths provided printouts of results for participants in order for them to keep and track their health information. Once potential participants arrived at the health fair site, there were asked if they would like to participate in the study via an invitation letter. They could then decline or sign the consent. Results: Percent body fat and visceral fat level differed between genders (p = < .001 and .001, respectively). Mean body fat levels (women 39.4%, men 28.8%) were unhealthy. Mean visceral fat level was unhealthy in men (16), but healthy in women (10). BMI and systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not differ between genders. Mean BMI was 31 kg m-2; 33% of participants were overweight, 44% were obese. Mean systolic and diastolic BP were 134 and 78 mg Hg, respectively. Most participants were hypertensive (systolic: men 57%, women 32%; diastolic: men 24%, women 7%) or prehypertensive (systolic: men 21%, women 39%; diastolic: men and women 36%). Conclusion: Obesity and high BP were common in this rural population, supporting the need for effective education and intervention efforts to address these health issues. Health fairs provide a manner in which to reach community persons needing referrals to local clinics, mental health providers and physicians. Education provided at such events is valuable as well and may in fact be the only health care contact they receive. Though community health fairs provide an economical way for individuals to receive screenings and health information, few men participated and few individuals attended in multiple years. The lack of repeat attendees prevented assessment of the efficacy of the education intervention. Means of enhancing participation, particularly by men and previous attendees, need to be explored. Repeatedly attending health fairs enables participants to monitor their progress, seek physical and mental health screenings and discuss any health concerns and helps researchers assess the efficacy of interventions.
Jensen Olaf, Olaf Jensen, , George Charalambous, Agnes Flores, Lise Hedegaard Laursen, David Lucas, Debbie Andrioti
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 3, pp 001-011; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001004

Aguirre Trina, Trina Aguirre, Leeza Struwe, Ann Koehler, Rebecca Kreman, Rebecca Bowman, Erica Schulte, Kayla Pierce, Molly Bloodgood, Jeffrey Holloway
Archives of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Volume 2, pp 001-005; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.apmh.1001002

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