Refine Search

New Search

Results: 12

(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764011418123)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Published: 6 December 2021
Quality & Quantity, Volume 56, pp 3539-3554; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-021-01277-6

Abstract:
Content or text analysis is one of the most common evaluation methods employed in qualitative research. Despite its wide application, however, a clear structure of how such evaluation should be conducted is often lacking due to the complexity of qualitative data. As a consequence, highly differentiated category systems with small-step subdivisions of categories and sub-categories are often used, leading to a loss of context both among categories and for the content as a whole. The aim of this paper is to describe the Phenomena-centered Text Analysis (PTA) as a novel form of qualitative text analysis, which takes these shortcomings into account by focusing on text-inherent phenomena. These phenomena are identified in two preceding quantitative analysis steps that identifying overlapping coding for subsequently qualitative analysis. We explain the structured code- and context-based approach of this new method and demonstrate its application with an empirical example. The PTA contributes to an increasing demand of qualitative methods especially for small-scale projects that need a structured kind of qualitative data analysis.
Published: 28 November 2021
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211057452

Abstract:
Previous research lags behind in illuminating theoretical mechanisms that shape governance decision-making on board practices. Using an integrated theoretical approach, I examine how board interlock network and institutional factors are associated with board governance policy adoption in nonprofit organizations. A linear regression model is employed to investigate policies adopted by a panel of public charities in three cities in Upstate New York during 2008 and 2014. Results show that not only the presence of board interlock networks but also central network positions relate to extensive policy adoption. Results also reveal that the use of paid professionals in management relates to institutional isomorphism reflected by more extensive governance policy adoption. These results provide insights for nonprofit leaders seeking to facilitate good governance practices by paying attention to board members’ affiliations and institutional environment considerations.
Ruomei Yang, Charles Harvey, Frank Mueller,
Published: 10 February 2021
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 50, pp 959-982; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764021991677

Abstract:
We examine the role of mediators in locally embedding the community foundation model of philanthropy to enable its global diffusion. We hold that mediators, as trusted agents within elite networks, promote and legitimate institutional innovation by tailoring the model to satisfy local requirements. They thereby limit resistance while creating future potentialities. Our novel addition to the community foundation literature stems from research on the transatlantic diffusion of the community foundation template from the United States to the United Kingdom focused on an in-depth case study of one of Europe’s largest community foundation, that serving Tyne & Wear and Northumberland in North East England. Our findings suggest that success in embedding the community foundation model depends on rendering it fit-for-context and fit-for-purpose. Mediators operating at both the macro and micro level matter because they have the cultural, social, and symbolic capital needed to win acceptance for initially alien philanthropic principles, practices, and structures.
, Abhisekh Ghosh Moulick,
Published: 24 July 2017
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 46, pp 1117-1141; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764017720769

Abstract:
Drawing upon transaction costs economics, we examine the determinants of the two-stage allocation process within the local United Way (UW) system. We use a unique multiyear data set that captures local UW allocations to nonprofit grantees at four points in time (2000, 2004, 2008, and 2010). We find that the first stage is screening, in which organizations’ legitimacy, mission, and financial performance are preliminary determinants of partnership in the UW system. In the second stage, UWs incentivize existing grantees with high legitimacy to stay in the system through larger allocation share. These determinants are stable over time. However, size of these effects varies across size of UW system; this finding suggests that transaction costs influence the likelihood of using performance measures to evaluate grantees in the first stage of the allocation process.
Published: 3 October 2016
International Public Management Journal, Volume 20, pp 356-380; https://doi.org/10.1080/10967494.2016.1237398

Abstract:
While organizational systems are associated with innovation and adaptability, interorganizational relationships may be predisposed to stability. Using multinomial logit analysis, we test how resource dependencies affect system stability in local United Way (UW) systems between 2000 and 2010. We find strong support for the resource dependence argument. UW are less likely to drop larger, powerful partners that are strong fundraising partners. However, powerful, long-term partners not contributing to the strategic objectives of the UW system are more likely to experience a decrease in allocations. While powerful resource partners may capture the UW, UW systems continue to change through the addition of new partners and the reallocation of resources among long-term partners. However, context also affects the capacity for change. Larger UWs are more likely to add new partners and less likely to keep long-term partners.
, Suzann Lupton
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 45, pp 156S-174S; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764016643608

Abstract:
Nonprofit organizations operate within the confines of formalized agreements structured by parent organizations, funders, and partners. Compliance with the rules comprising these agreements leads to organizational legitimacy and the resulting access to resources. At times, compliance can be challenging because internal and external stakeholders exert pressures on nonprofits that can sometimes dissuade rule adherence. These pressures can be amplified when a nonprofit is an affiliate. Affiliate nonprofits must meet accountability demands of their local constituencies while aligning missions, organizational structures, governance, and programmatic activities with parent organizations that might be geographically distant. Affiliate status thus adds a layer of complication to an already complex environment. We conduct an institutional analysis as a basis for assessing how nonprofit affiliates interpret global rules for maintaining affiliate status and factors most important to them in maintaining continued compliance with such rules. Our research is conducted in the context of United Way (UW) affiliate organizations in Indiana.
, Stijn Van Puyvelde, Marc Jegers, , Jemima Bidee, Roland Pepermans
Published: 9 February 2015
Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Volume 86, pp 73-88; https://doi.org/10.1111/apce.12067

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Leslie Stoel, Linda Niehm, Nicole Eckerson
Published: 1 September 2013
Journal of Small Business & Entrepreneurship, Volume 26, pp 443-462; https://doi.org/10.1080/08276331.2013.876761

Abstract:
This study uses institutional theory to examine the relationship between rural community norms and optimism for new firm survival. A survey of 1161 residents and business owners in 32 rural US communities explored community-wide attitudes toward change and norms related to community and local business sector symbolic and performative actions and their influence on local residents’ optimism about prospects for success of new businesses. Multiple regression analysis revealed that institutional norms supporting change and reflecting positive attitudes regarding residents’ and business owners’ actions in the task environments are positively related to community optimism about new firm survival. Evidence also supports differential effects of population size on norms related to openness to change and retailer performative actions. Findings suggest that the rural community institutional environment may have an influence on efforts to attract and retain new businesses in rural communities.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top