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(searched for: doi:10.13182/nt80-a32432)
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, Milan Hnizdil, , Miroslav Raudensky
Published: 29 June 2018
Heat Transfer Engineering, Volume 40, pp 1649-1655; https://doi.org/10.1080/01457632.2018.1480881

Abstract:
A basic energy balance that includes phase change has been used to describe the boiling heat transfer process. By using the differential form of this energy balance, the relative change in the heat transfer coefficient can be determined when the surface and coolant temperature change. This represents a general solution to the boiling heat transfer problem under high flux conditions where fully mixed thermal boundary layer exists, although the solution procedure is approximate. The results agree quite well with experimental data. Further work remains to prescribe the heat transfer process near the critical heat flux and Leidenfrost point. This approach vastly reduces the empiricism and data required for boiling heat transfer processes, and also existing data can be used to generalize to a wide range of conditions.
Published: 1 January 2011
Multiphase Flow Dynamics 3 pp 283-317; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-21372-4_12

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S. S. Sadhal, P. S. Ayyaswamy, J. N. Chung
Engineering Materials and Processes pp 275-310; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4022-8_6

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L.J. Huang, P.S. Ayyaswamy, Srinivas S. Sripada
International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 39, pp 3791-3797; https://doi.org/10.1016/0017-9310(96)00064-6

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Jong-Chull Jo, Sang-Kyoon Lee, Won-Ky Shin
Published: 1 September 1991
KSME Journal, Volume 5, pp 130-139; https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02953612

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Jeremy D. M. Linn, Stephen J. Maskell, Mike A. Patrick
Published: 1 April 1988
by AMNS
Nuclear Technology, Volume 81, pp 122-125; https://doi.org/10.13182/nt88-a34084

Abstract:
Heat transfer rates to spray droplets under conditions corresponding to those of a loss-of-coolant accident in a light water nuclear reactor have been recalculated in light of the discovery of missing mass exchange terms in the equations of motion used in a previously published computation. While the inclusion of these missing terms into the model equations proves to make only a small difference in the rate of temperature increase of the droplet, the fall distance of the droplets, important in spray heat transfer efficiency, is significantly altered. Furthermore, it is shown that the predicted fall distance, e.g., at 95% temperature interval increase, is very sensitive to the drag law employed in the calculation.
Yasuo Motoki, Mitsuo Naritomi, Mitsugu Tanaka, Gunji Nishio, Kazuichiro Hashimoto, Susumu Kitani
Published: 1 November 1983
by AMNS
Nuclear Technology, Volume 63, pp 316-329; https://doi.org/10.13182/nt83-a33290

Abstract:
Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment spray were carried out to investigate effectiveness of the depressurization by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute model containment (7-m diameter, 20 m high, and 708-m3 volume) with PWR spray nozzles. The depressurization rate is influenced by the spray heat transfer efficiency and the containment wall surface heat transfer coefficient. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was investigated with respect to spray flow rate, weight ratio of steam/air, and spray height. The spray droplet heat transfer efficiency was investigated whether the overlapping of spray patterns gives effect or not. The effect was not detectable in the range of large value of steam/air, however, it was better in the range of small value of it. The experimental results were compared with the calculated results by computer code CONTEMPT-LT/022. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was almost 100% in the containment pressure, ranging from 2.5 to 0.9 kg/cm2·G, so that the code was useful on the prediction of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of containment atmosphere in a PWR accident condition.
Mitsugu Tanaka, Hironori Watanabe, Kazuichiro Hashimoto, Yasuo Motoki, Mitsuo Naritomi, Gunji Nishio, Susumu Kitani
Published: 1 July 1981
by AMNS
Nuclear Technology, Volume 54, pp 54-67; https://doi.org/10.13182/nt81-a32753

Abstract:
Capacity curves, spray distributions, and droplet size distributions of light water reactor [pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR)] containment spray nozzles are obtained, and the heat removal effectiveness is evaluated by a computer program CONDENSE. It is revealed by the calculations that spray droplets from a PWR spray nozzle always attain the containment atmosphere temperature and spray droplets from a BWR spray nozzle attain the containment atmosphere temperature above ≍70°C.
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