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(searched for: doi:10.1177/08997640972640091)
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Published: 13 June 2016
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7060075

Abstract:
This paper describes a developing partnership between a church-based service learning center and a university initiative to build a field station in a low-income community in the anthracite coal region of Pennsylvania. It is a case study of how secular and religious institutions have been collaborating to achieve the shared goal of improving social conditions in specific communities. The theoretical focus of the paper is on how a change from a “glass is half empty” to a “glass is half full” perception of the community opens new possibilities for change. This paper concentrates on the story of one partnership as a case study demonstrating current trends in service learning both within universities and within the Catholic Church in America. Analysis centers on the basic question of why the project had symbolic power for both partners and on the institutional processes within both organizations that helped the partnership grow. We use the framework of Assets-Based Community Development (ABCD), also known as the “strengths perspective”, to conceptualize the contrast.
Carl Milofsky,
Published: 21 November 2014
Journal of Applied Social Science, Volume 9, pp 170-181; https://doi.org/10.1177/1936724414559388

Abstract:
This article presents two case studies, linked together as chained projects, as examples of public sociology involving university/community partnerships. Research described here illustrates specific ways that applied sociology and public sociology can be put to work to address community problems. While the projects described here are an important focus, the article argues that they are primarily valuable in showing how a regional resource exchange network can be set up over a period of decades and how the presence of these partnerships creates the possibility for one project to chain into another. We describe this chaining as a resource exchange network and as a “virtual organization.” Virtual organizations are intentionally created, possess internal logic, and contain a set of actors who carry out interdependent roles. Virtual organizations lack formal structure and require a minimum of organizational maintenance. The chaining method and the associated virtual organization help to bring university actors and resources to bear on helping to solve community problems.
Ram A. Cnaan, Carl Milofsky, Albert Hunter
Published: 1 January 2008
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Carl Milofsky
Published: 14 June 2006
Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 16, pp 467-480; https://doi.org/10.1002/nml.121

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