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(searched for: doi:10.1075/idj.23.1.09che)
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Will Stahl-Timmins, Jonathan Black,
Identifying information and tenor in texts, Volume 25, pp 101-109; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.25.1.08sta

Abstract:
The British Medical Journal has recently started making visual abstracts to summarise published research studies. These 1024 × 1024 px images give a quick overview of a trial’s participants, design, and key findings. These visual abstracts are designed to help busy health professionals and researchers get a quick overview of newly published research. The present article describes simple pragmatic evaluations of these visual abstracts: analysis of social media stats and an opportunistic reader survey. Our goals were to identify how useful our readers found this new visual format, and whether there were any improvements we could make. The social media stats were initially very promising. Longer term performance over several visual abstracts, however, was not as strong, suggesting a possible halo effect provided by the novelty of a new presentation format. The survey proved to be a quick and valuable way of getting feedback on the design of the initial template, and resulted in several design adjustments.
Zhiyuan Ying
Published: 1 April 2021
Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Volume 1881; https://doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/1881/2/022020

Abstract:
Film and television special effect embodies the new development of the combination of visual technology and art. It has become an effective expression method of contemporary movies and an indispensable technical guarantee for creative realization. This article mainly studies the special effects of interactive film and television animation in visual design. This article attempts to take the perspective of visual design as an entry point, push traditional film and television animation to the forefront of technology, and combine the new characteristics of film and television animation with the changes in science to analyze the influence of traditional film special effects theory on digital technology. The changes in the spatial form that have occurred underneath. In this special effects creation, film and television special effects technology and space performance theory are combined. In theory, the three spatial forms in film and television special effects creation are redefined and expressed according to creative practice. They are spatial expression from scratch, spatial expression combining virtual and real, and interactive expression between space and people or things. Technically, it has achieved a breakthrough in its own capabilities. Experimental data shows that under the three backgrounds of medium saturation + high brightness, low brightness + high saturation, and medium brightness + high saturation, there is no more comfortable foreground color to match with it, showing obvious visual discomfort.
Timothy O’Mahony, Jason Petz, Jonathan Cook, ,
Published: 1 May 2019
Journal: PLOS ONE
Abstract:
Visual design, learning sciences, and nanotechnology may be strange bedfellows; yet, as this paper highlights, peer interaction between a designer and a scientist is an effective method for helping scientists acquire visual design skills. We describe our findings from observing twelve sessions at the Design Help Desk, a tutoring center at the University of Washington. At each session, a scientist (who is expert in his own domain but a novice in design) consulted a designer (who is expert in design but a novice in science) in order to receive advice and guidance on how to improve a scientific visualization. At the Design Help Desk, this pairing consistently produced a momentary disequilibrium in the scientist’s thought process: a disequilibrium that led to agency (where the scientist gained ownership of his/her own learning) and conceptual change in the scientist’s understanding of visual design. Scientists who visited the Design Help Desk were satisfied with their experience, and their published work demonstrated an improved ability to visually communicate research findings—a skill critical to the advancement of science. To our knowledge, the Design Help Desk is a unique effort to educate scientists in visual design; we are not aware of any other design-advice/tutoring centers at public or private universities in the United States or abroad.
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