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(searched for: doi:10.1037/0022-3514.86.3.435)
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Kenneth D. Keith
Published: 25 March 2019
Cross-Cultural Psychology pp 3-22; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119519348.ch1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Collabra: Psychology, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.1525/collabra.223

Abstract:
In this short commentary, data from the website Reddit is used to examine how people receive social psychological research. The data show that people care greatly about research dealing with humans: links tagged as psychology, social sciences, and health are upvoted more than other categories on Reddit. Within the category of psychology, articles were coded based on the topic of research. Articles dealing generally with social psychological topics are among the highest in number and upvotes on the subreddit r/Science. Many posts were upvoted tens of thousands of times. However, upvotes on Reddit are unrelated to scientific publishing metrics (e.g., impact factor, journal rankings, and citations), suggesting a disconnect between what psychologists and Redditors may see as relevant. These findings also highlight some points for reflection. For example, psychologists may benefit from thinking about the purpose, goals, and beneficiaries of the research they pursue. Additionally, the level of attention that some psychological research receives has implications for transparent research practices. Researchers have a responsibility to ensure that findings are reported accurately and transparently because, whether scientists like it or not, people care about psychological research, they share it, and use it in their lives.
Academy of Management Learning & Education, Volume 16, pp 509-530; https://doi.org/10.5465/amle.2016.0080

Abstract:
This paper explores the perceptions, preferences, and motivations that contribute to a widely recognized phenomenon: the continuous rise of co-authorship within the field of management. Using data from Web of Science, we first confirm that the average number of authors on published papers has steadily and continuously increased over the last four decades, and compare this trend across subfields and journals. We also conducted a survey, asking management researchers about their perceptions of co-authorship trends and their reactions to specific authorship scenarios. Comparing the "facts" and the "perceptions" of co-authorship, we suggest that increasing co-authorship in management reflects not only quality considerations and the need for collaborations but also instrumental motivations. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for the processes of peer evaluation and education in management.
, Jennifer E. Dannals, Julian J. Zlatev
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 12, pp 454-467; https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691616681645

Abstract:
We argue that psychologists who conduct experiments with long lags between the manipulation and the outcome measure should pay more attention to behavioral processes that intervene between the manipulation and the outcome measure. Neglect of such processes, we contend, stems from psychology’s long tradition of short-lag lab experiments where there is little scope for intervening behavioral processes. Studying process in the lab invariably involves studying psychological processes, but in long-lag field experiments it is important to study causally relevant behavioral processes as well as psychological ones. To illustrate the roles that behavioral processes can play in long-lag experiments we examine field experiments motivated by three policy-relevant goals: prejudice reduction, health promotion, and educational achievement. In each of the experiments discussed we identify various behavioral pathways through which the manipulated psychological state could have produced the observed outcome. We argue that if psychologists conducting long-lag interventions posited a theory of change that linked manipulated psychological states to outcomes via behavioral pathways, the result would be richer theory and more practically useful research. Movement in this direction would also permit more opportunities for productive collaborations between psychologists and other social scientists interested in similar social problems.
, Wing Gi Leung, Bryony Crane, Brian Parkinson, Timothea Toulopoulou,
Published: 13 March 2017
Behavior Research Methods, Volume 50, pp 302-312; https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-017-0871-0

Abstract:
Most research into cognitive biases has used Western samples, despite potential East-West socio-cultural differences. One reason is the lack of appropriate measures for non-Westerners. This study is about cross-linguistic equivalence which needs to be established before assessing cross-cultural differences in future research. We developed parallel Mandarin and English measures of interpretation bias and attention bias using back-translation and decentering procedures. We assessed task equivalence by administering both sets of measures to 47 bilingual Mandarin-English speakers. Interpretation bias measurement was similar and reliable across language versions, confirming suitability of the Mandarin versions for future cross-cultural research. By contrast, scores on attention bias tasks did not intercorrelate reliably, suggesting that nonverbal stimuli such as pictures or facial expressions of emotion might present better prospects for cross-cultural comparison. The development of the first set of equivalent measures of interpretation bias in an Eastern language paves the way for future research investigating East-West differences in biased cognition.
, Marina Chernikova,
European Journal of Social Psychology, Volume 47, pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2285

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Piergiorgio Argentero
Journal of Health Psychology, Volume 22, pp 51-67; https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105315595120

Abstract:
Moral distress occurs when professionals cannot carry out what they believe to be ethically appropriate actions. This review describes the publication trend on moral distress and explores its relationships with other constructs. A bibliometric analysis revealed that since 1984, 239 articles were published, with an increase after 2011. Most of them (71%) focused on nursing. Of the 239 articles, 17 empirical studies were systematically analyzed. Moral distress correlated with organizational environment (poor ethical climate and collaboration), professional attitudes (low work satisfaction and engagement), and psychological characteristics (low psychological empowerment and autonomy). Findings revealed that moral distress negatively affects clinicians’ wellbeing and job retention. Further studies should investigate protective psychological factors to develop preventive interventions.
, Jin X. Goh
Social Psychological and Personality Science, Volume 7, pp 437-443; https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550616644297

Abstract:
This research examined a possible gender gap in personality and social psychology. According to membership demographics from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), women and men are represented near parity in the field. Yet despite this equal representation, the field may still suffer from a different type of gender gap. We examined the gender of first authors in two major journals, citations to these articles, and gender of award recipients. In random samples of five issues per year across 10 years (2004–2013; N = 1,094), 34% of first authors in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology were women and 44% of first authors in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin were women. Articles authored by men were cited more than those authored by women. In examining the gender of award recipients given by SPSP (2000–2016), on average, 25% of the recipients were women.
Published: 31 August 2015
Small Group Research, Volume 46, pp 589-622; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496415602778

Abstract:
In the literature, the notion of the ever-growing prevalence of teamwork is dominating. First, has there indeed been a steadily increasing trajectory of the societal diffusion of and academic research on teamwork? If so, what have the main drivers of this trajectory been? In this review, we apply a multi-method approach to examine these questions. Specifically, we combine the established bibliometric method of scholarly article counts with the innovative approach of culturomics that allows the content analysis of a literature corpus spanning millions of books, both popular and scholarly. The results show that although academic research on teamwork has grown constantly and has shown a sharp increase over the past 40 years, the societal diffusion of teamwork, as indicated through the culturomics approach, actually followed a volatile trend in the past century. Certain large-scale events and developments, such as war, may serve as an explanation for these changing trends.
, Chiara Libreri, Edoardo Lozza,
Published: 4 November 2014
Health Expectations, Volume 19, pp 516-526; https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12299

Abstract:
Patient‐centred care has been advocated as a key component of high‐quality patient care, yet its meanings and related actions have been difficult to ascertain. To map the use of different terms related to the process of giving patients a starring role in their own care and clarify the possible boundaries between terms that are often mixed. A literature search was conducted using different electronic databases. All records containing the search terms ‘patient engagement’, ‘patient activation’, ‘patient empowerment’, ‘patient involvement’, ‘patient adherence’, ‘patient compliance’ and ‘patient participation’ were collected. Identified literature was then analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). The number of yearly publications, most productive countries, cross‐concepts articles and various scientific fields dealing with the multidisciplinary concepts were identified. Overall, 58 987 papers were analysed. Correspondence analysis revealed three temporal trends. The first period (2002–2004) focused on compliance and adherence, the second period (2006–2009) focused on the relationship between participation and involvement, and the third one (2010–2013) emphasized empowerment. Patient activation and patient engagement followed the temporal development trend connected to the ‘immediate future’. The bibliometric trend suggests that the role of patient in the health‐care system is changing. In the last years, the patient was viewed as a passive receptor of medical prescription. To date, the need to consider patients as active partners of health‐care planning and delivery is growing. In particular, the term patient engagement appears promising, not only for its increasing growth of interest in the scholarly debate, but also because it offers a broader and better systemic conceptualization of the patients’ role in the fruition of health care. To build a shared vocabulary of terms and concepts related to the active role of patients in the health‐care process may be envisaged as the first operative step towards a concrete innovation of health‐care organizations and systems.
International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Volume 8, pp 71-94; https://doi.org/10.1080/1750984x.2015.1019540

Abstract:
Bibliometric methods were used to examine: (1) research themes in sport and exercise psychology articles published between 2008 and 2011; and (2) the intellectual base of the field of sport and exercise psychology, defined as influential literature being cited in these articles. The dataset consisted of 795 articles from five sport and exercise psychology journals and 345 articles obtained through citation-based extension (n = 1140 articles). A cluster analysis yielded 73 clusters showing themes in sport and exercise psychology research. Principal component analysis was used to identify and analyze relationships between 14 highly cited research areas constituting the intellectual base of sport and exercise psychology. Some main findings were: (1) the identification of many re-emerging themes, (2) research related to motivation seems to be extensive, (3) sport psychology and exercise psychology research share theoretical frameworks to some extent, however (4) differences compared to previous reviews indicate that sport psychology and exercise psychology may be regarded as two distinct research fields, rather than one united field, and (5) isolated research areas were identified indicating potential for research integration. Suggestions for future research are provided. The bibliometric approach presented a broad overview of trends and knowledge base in sport and exercise psychology research.
, Angela G. Pirlott
Personality and Social Psychology Review, Volume 19, pp 30-43; https://doi.org/10.1177/1088868314542878

Abstract:
Statistical mediation methods provide valuable information about underlying mediating psychological processes, but the ability to infer that the mediator variable causes the outcome variable is more complex than widely known. Researchers have recently emphasized how violating assumptions about confounder bias severely limits causal inference of the mediator to dependent variable relation. Our article describes and addresses these limitations by drawing on new statistical developments in causal mediation analysis. We first review the assumptions underlying causal inference and discuss three ways to examine the effects of confounder bias when assumptions are violated. We then describe four approaches to address the influence of confounding variables and enhance causal inference, including comprehensive structural equation models, instrumental variable methods, principal stratification, and inverse probability weighting. Our goal is to further the adoption of statistical methods to enhance causal inference in mediation studies.
European Journal of Personality, Volume 27, pp 5-14; https://doi.org/10.1002/per.1843

Abstract:
Nine principal personality psychology journals— Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (JPSP), Journal of Personality (JP), Journal of Research in Personality (JRP), European Journal of Personality (EJP), Personality and Individual Differences (PAID), Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (PSPB), Personality and Social Psychology Review (PSPR), Journal of Personality Assessment (JPA), and Journal of Personality Disorders (JPD)—have published 8510 research papers from 2001 to 2010. These papers have been cited 149 108 times (September 2011) by papers published in journals indexed in the Web of Science. Although personality psychologists from the US published the largest number of papers (4924, 57.9%) and had the largest number of citations (101 875, 68.3%), their relative contribution to personality literature has slightly diminished during the first decade of the new millennium. Unlike other countries, personality psychologists residing in the US demonstrated a strong country self–citation bias: They were about 14% more likely to cite papers which were written by their compatriots rather than non–US authors in three leading journals JPSP, PSPB, and PSPR. The intensity and pattern of citations indicate that personality psychology indeed occupies one of the core positions at the heart of psychological knowledge. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Futoshi Kobayashi
Psychology Learning & Teaching, Volume 12, pp 253-258; https://doi.org/10.2304/plat.2013.12.3.253

Abstract:
Japanese college students ( N = 18) aspiring to become English teachers in junior or senior high schools studied several examples of educational games and created their own English games as an assignment during the last two weeks of an educational psychology course. Results indicated (1) a significant increase between pre- and post- self-evaluations of students' own English teaching ability, and (2) significantly positive ratings of the effectiveness of the assignment from a neutral Likert response point. As the use of games for effective learning has been demonstrated among college students on various psychology courses in the USA, the results suggested this might also be beneficial for (1) Japanese students and (2) educational psychology courses.
Roger K. Blashfield, Shannon M. Reynolds
Journal of Personality Disorders, Volume 26, pp 821-829; https://doi.org/10.1521/pedi.2012.26.6.821

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 7, pp 562-571; https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691612457576

Abstract:
The current crisis in psychological research involves issues of fraud, replication, publication bias, and false positive results. I argue that this crisis follows the failure of widely adopted solutions to psychology’s similar crisis of the 1970s. The untouched root cause is an information-economic one: Too many studies divided by too few publication outlets equals a bottleneck. Articles cannot pass through just by showing theoretical meaning and methodological rigor; their results must appear to support the hypothesis perfectly. Consequently, psychologists must master the art of presenting perfect-looking results just to survive in the profession. This favors aesthetic criteria of presentation in a way that harms science’s search for truth. Shallow standards of statistical perfection distort analyses and undermine the accuracy of cumulative data; narrative expectations encourage dishonesty about the relationship between results and hypotheses; criteria of novelty suppress replication attempts. Concerns about truth in research are emerging in other sciences and may eventually descend on our heads in the form of difficult and insensitive regulations. I suggest a more palatable solution: to open the bottleneck, putting structures in place to reward broader forms of information sharing beyond the exquisite art of present-day journal publication.
Jeffrey Kushkowski
Journal of Business & Finance Librarianship, Volume 17, pp 201-219; https://doi.org/10.1080/08963568.2012.685035

Abstract:
Since 1981 the Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference (BCERC) has published cutting-edge entrepreneurship research. Using bibliometric techniques, this study examined the 3,395 items included in Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, the BCERC proceedings, between 1981 and 2008. The results show that entrepreneurship is a highly collaborative, interdisciplinary field with an increasingly international focus. The results offer an understanding of the demographic, institutional, and topical trends within the field. This research provides valuable insights into the structure of entrepreneurship that librarians can use to provide better assistance to their entrepreneurship scholars.
, Zoe Walton
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 7, pp 72-78; https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691611429356

Abstract:
An academic journal’s impact factor (hereafter JIF) is an average measure of the citation count of individual articles published in that journal. JIF is used to assess merit, predict impact, and allocate resources, but the actual number of citations to individual articles is only modestly correlated with the JIFs of the journals in which they are published. We counted PsycInfo citations to 1,133 articles published in nine leading psychology journals (1996–2005). Both article length ( r =.31) and reference list length ( r = .41) predicted log-transformed citation counts better than JIF ( r = .27). Articles with fewer graphs and more structural equation models were more frequently cited. Citation count was better predicted by a model based on article length and citation count rather than JIF. When JIF was used to predict citation count, the impact of women authors and social science research was underestimated. These findings distinguish impact in science, as measured by JIF, from actual impact in psychology, and they show the unintended consequences of using a measure of the former to predict the latter.
Psychology Learning & Teaching, Volume 11, pp 316-325; https://doi.org/10.2304/plat.2012.11.3.316

Abstract:
In a world made smaller by information technology and convenient travel, the teaching of a psychology of all people has become increasingly important. However, the content of western psychology, in both research and teaching, has failed to encompass the complexities of culture and the importance of the role of cultural understanding in the modern world. This article presents some of the culture-based challenges facing psychology and teachers of psychology, including ethnocentrism, development of cultural competence, and integration of cultural concepts in teaching. The author concludes that the contributions of psychology to the solution of important world problems depend in part upon broader cultural understanding.
, Alex Jadidian, Gregory D. Webster, Kyle J. Sandell
Published: 16 July 2011
Scientometrics, Volume 89, pp 207-227; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-011-0452-4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Volume 4, pp 364-378; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-9004.2010.00268.x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 June 2010
Psychological Reports, Volume 106, pp 891-900; https://doi.org/10.2466/pr0.106.3.891-900

Abstract:
The citation impact of a comprehensive sample of articles published in social and personality psychology journals in 1998 was evaluated. Potential predictors of the 10-yr. citation impact of 1,580 articles from 37 journals were investigated, including number of authors, number of references, journal impact factor, author nationality, and article length, using linear regression. The impact factor of the journal in which articles appeared was the primary predictor of the citations that they accrued, accounting for 30% of the total variance. Articles with greater length, more references, and more authors were cited relatively often, although the citation advantage of longer articles was not proportionate to their length. A citation advantage was also enjoyed by authors from the United States of America, Canada, and the United Kingdom. 37% of the variance in the total number of citations was accounted for by the study variables.
Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Volume 32, pp 526-527; https://doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x09991270

Abstract:
We question a central premise upon which the target article is based. Namely, we point out that the evidence for “positive illusions” is in fact quite mixed. As such, the question of whether positive illusions are adaptive from an evolutionary standpoint may be premature in light of the fact that their very existence may be an illusion.
Personality and Social Psychology Review, Volume 13, pp 334-353; https://doi.org/10.1177/1088868309347835

Abstract:
For the first half of the 20th century, sociology was one of the closest allies of social psychology. Over the past four decades, however, the connection with sociology has weakened, whereas new connections with neighboring disciplines (e.g., biology, economics, political science) have formed. Along the way, the sociological perspective has been largely lost in mainstream social psychology in the United States. Most social psychologists today are not concerned with collective phenomena and do not investigate social structural factors (e.g., residential mobility, socioeconomic status, dominant religion, political systems). Even when the social structural factors are included in the analysis, psychologists typically treat them as individual difference variables. Sociologist C. Wright Mills famously promoted sociological imagination, or the ability to see distal yet important social forces operating in a larger societal context. By comparing sociological perspectives to psychological perspectives, this article highlights the insights that the sociological perspective and sociological imagination can bring to social psychology.
Published: 1 May 2009
Behavior Research Methods, Volume 41, pp 425-438; https://doi.org/10.3758/brm.41.2.425

Abstract:
Mediation models are often used as a means to explain the psychological mechanisms between an independent and a dependent variable in the behavioral and social sciences. A major limitation of the unstandardized indirect effect calculated from raw scores is that it cannot be interpreted as an effect-size measure. In contrast, the standardized indirect effect calculated from standardized scores can be a good candidate as a measure of effect size because it is scale invariant. In the present article, 11 methods for constructing the confidence intervals (CIs) of the standardized indirect effects were evaluated via a computer simulation. These included six Wald CIs, three bootstrap CIs, one likelihood-based CI, and the PRODCLIN CI. The results consistently showed that the percentile bootstrap, the bias-corrected bootstrap, and the likelihood-based approaches had the best coverage probability. Mplus, LISREL, and Mx syntax were included to facilitate the use of these preferred methods in applied settings. Future issues on the use of the standardized indirect effects are discussed.
Published: 1 January 2009
Annual Review of Psychology, Volume 60, pp 369-394; https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163655

Abstract:
There appears to be a universal desire to understand individual differences. This common desire exhibits both universal and culturally specific features. Motivations to view oneself positively differ substantially across cultural contexts, as do a number of other variables that covary with this motivation (i.e., approach-avoidance motivations, internal-external frames of reference, independent-interdependent views of self, incremental-entity theories of abilities, dialectical self-views, and relational mobility). The structure of personality traits, particularly the five-factor model of personality, emerges quite consistently across cultures, with some key variations noted when the structure is drawn from indigenous traits in other languages. The extent to which each of the Big 5 traits is endorsed in each culture varies considerably, although we note some methodological challenges with comparing personality traits across cultures. Finally, although people everywhere can conceive of each other in terms of personality traits, people in collectivistic cultures appear to rely on traits to a lesser degree when understanding themselves and others, compared with those from individualistic cultures.
, Lauren Ban, Leah Kaufmann, Stephen Loughnan, , Jennifer Whelan,
Published: 22 May 2008
Scientometrics, Volume 76, pp 169-185; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-007-1892-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
P. J. Henry
Published: 22 May 2008
Psychological Inquiry, Volume 19, pp 49-71; https://doi.org/10.1080/10478400802049936

Abstract:
Twenty years have passed since Sears (1986) Sears, D. O. 1986. College sophomores in the laboratory: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology's view of human nature. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology., 51: 515–530. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] alerted social psychologists to the many possible dangers faced by relying on a database composed mostly of students, especially with respect to the generalizability of the theoretical conclusions we come to. With a focus this time on the prejudice literature, this article examines how much has changed in our approach to whom we study. Content analyses show that prejudice researchers who publish in social psychology's major journals continue to rely heavily on student samples. Next, data are presented showing that important differences may exist between student and nonstudent participants in terms of how prejudice-related variables are expressed and used. The article concludes by raising metatheoretical concerns about the continued use of student samples both in the conclusions we arrive at as a science and in the very topics we study in the prejudice literature, with various recommendations suggested for decreasing this trend in relying on such a narrow database.
, Timothy Takemoto, Sophia Moskalenko, Jannine Lasaleta, Joseph Henrich
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Volume 34, pp 879-887; https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167208316921

Abstract:
In a society where there are pronounced concerns for “face,” people come to be especially focused on how they are being evaluated by others. We reasoned that Japanese should conceive of themselves in terms of how they think they are considered by others. This hypothesis was tested by contrasting Japanese and North American participants who were in front of a mirror with those who were not. In two studies, replicating past research, North Americans who were in front of a mirror were more self-critical and were less likely to cheat than were those who were not in front of a mirror. In contrast, Japanese participants were unaffected by the presence of the mirror.
David A. Kenny
Published: 28 November 2007
Organizational Research Methods, Volume 11, pp 353-358; https://doi.org/10.1177/1094428107308978

Abstract:
This commentary reviews the author's history with mediation. In the second part, the author attempts to explain why there is such interest in the topic. In the third part, the author comments on the five articles in this feature topic.
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 1, pp 251-269; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6916.2006.00015.x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Fredda Blanchard-Fields,
Psychology and Aging, Volume 21, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.21.1.1

Abstract:
This article provides a review of the first 20 years of Psychology and Aging, the American Psychological Association's first and only scholarly journal devoted to the topic of aging. The authors briefly summarize its history, its contributions to the study of aging, and its broader status as a scholarly publication. One theme highlighted in our review is the diversity of content in the journal throughout its history. Another is the strong impact that articles published in the journal have had on both basic and applied topics in aging. Efforts to encompass the breadth of topics and methodologies in aging research while retaining excellent quality remain the exciting but essential challenge for Psychology and Aging.
Roger C. Mannell, Douglas A. Kleiber, Marianne Staempfli
Published: 1 January 2006
A Handbook of Leisure Studies pp 109-124; https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230625181_7

Comment
, Gary Rosenberg, Kathleen Barker
Published: 30 November 2005
Social Work in Health Care, Volume 41, pp 129-148; https://doi.org/10.1300/j010v41n03_09

Abstract:
The authors conclude this special issue by responding to the commentaries of their colleagues and reviewing relevant scholarship that appeared in the bibliometric literature since their literature reviews for the initial three articles in this issue were completed. They conclude, in part, that examination of bibliometric data regarding the entry of an article into the profession's knowledge base, and its ongoing life therein, may provide insights about the scientific communication process that lead to improvements of that process.
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