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(searched for: doi:10.17238/issn2221-2698.24.14)
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, Ria-Maria Adams, Aytalina Ivanova
Published: 22 June 2022
Journal of Youth Studies pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2022.2081493

Abstract:
Many small remote cities in the circumpolar North lose population. Our starting point is that such settlements have a viable future when young people see perspectives for their own well-being there. This article studies such perspectives using cases from northern Russia and northern Finland, based on empirically grounded fieldwork. Emphasising contextuality, we analyse how authorities, civil society and industrial companies provide conditions for youth well-being in northern industrial settlements. The results show, how a viable urban community could look like for young inhabitants: crucial determinants are education, social networks and family ties, nature, housing, comfortable infrastructure, meaningful work, mobility and good health. While many of the results resembled between the case study regions, among the differences in the two countries, we found that in Finland notions of a good life in the North base more on individual preferences than in Russia, where collective notions are more important. In conclusion, we suggest that youth well-being becomes a principal component of concepts of viable urban communities, including but not limited to such cases as Arctic peripheral single-industry towns.
A. E. Shaparov, F. K. Sokolova, A. K. Magomedov,
Published: 24 January 2022
Journal: Polar Record
Abstract:
The Russian Arctic regions have a significant geographical, historical, and economic connection with the Northern Sea Route (NSR); the successful implementation of Russia’s geo-political and geo-economic strategies in the Arctic is mainly dependent upon the socio-economic situation in these regions. Population migration is a determinant of the current and future labour potential of the supporting regions; compared to natural growth, it has been a key driver of population and an indicator of the quality of human resources. The research herein considered the factors and impacts of migration on the quality of human resources in the Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation (AZRF). Russian population census data for 2002 and 2010, and statistical materials were analysed by age and migrant education to characterise the quality of human resources. To identify the causes of migration, the quantitative data analyses were supplemented with results from sociological studies and expert assessments. An index methodology was used to compare the quality of life and human capital development of the Arctic regions. Accordingly, most of the analysed Arctic regions showed high indicators of human development, which were higher than the national average in education, but significantly lower in longevity. Further, most of the Arctic regions occupied lower positions in Russian regional quality of life. It was concluded that the AZRF regions hold high quality of human capital; however, since high-quality living conditions are lacking, they serve as donors of human capital to other parts of the country. These regions would require external labour resources in the near future due to the planned large-scale projects for the development of the NSR, concurrent reduction and ageing of labour resources, and demand changes in the labour market. The government’s socio-economic policies would determine the scale, dynamics, and direction of migration, as well as their impact on the demographics and labour potential of the supporting regions of the NSR.
Published: 1 November 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Sustainability
Sustainability, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132112058

Abstract:
Based on quantitative and qualitative analysis, this paper attempts to answer a research question that is critical for many Arctic communities: “What makes local youth want to leave?” Using the Russian Arctic cities of Naryan-Mar, Salekhard, and Novy Urengoy (Nenets and Yamalo-Nenets regions) as case studies, this article explores how local youth contribute to social sustainability and define the futures of their Arctic cities. The study identifies new variables relevant to the youth cohort built on the Urban Sustainability Index and social sustainability model. Based on 400+ questionnaires and interviews with Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth, education professionals, and public officials, this study looks at the youth’s educational and professional strategies, social activities and cultural consumption, migration patterns, and civic engagement in a broader context. This article also discusses how local youth feel disempowered in building their futures and highlights the importance of access to educational opportunities and wider career choices in the Arctic.
Abstract:
The problem of insufficient population of the Arctic territories is one of the urgent problems of the state. A possible source of population and potential labor is the northern regions located in the immediate vicinity of the Arctic zone. Demographic and social problems of the North are reflected in the social behavior of young people. The inability to meet their own needs leads young people to decide on migration and, accordingly, to reduce the labor potential of the region. In this paper, issues related to the definition of migration attitudes, causes and factors of youth migration were raised. The purpose of the study: to determine the migration attitudes of young people and the migration behavior that implements these attitudes. The object of the study was the final year students of various fields and levels of education. A semi-structured interview was chosen as the research method. Based on the interviews conducted, the main groups of strategies that reflect the migration behavior of young people, as well as their key features, were identified. The main criteria for the formulation of strategies were the orientation of migration plans and the activity in the manifestation of migration behavior. On their basis, 4 groups of migration strategies were identified: active (“Moving”, “Settling”) and passive (“Waiting for moving”, “ Waiting for conditions»). The tendency of informants to active or passive strategies of migration behavior is determined by a number of factors that are significant for a particular individual, having both internal and external nature. Of the external factors, the current place of residence is more affected, and of the internal factors, the level of education. The factors are differentiated depending on the group of strategies. Those seeking to move are more likely to pay attention to the development of the entertainment infrastructure and career prospects, who have chosen their current place of residence – predictability and stability of future conditions, the ability to communicate with loved ones. Based on the results of the research, it is proposed to focus on the factors that are important for passive strategies, since this will allow for a more effective impact on the migration behavior of young people.
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