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(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.jcrs.2003.08.001)
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, Rushmia Karim, Dipak N. Parmar
Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Volume 39, pp 1254-1259; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrs.2013.06.005

Abstract:
To standardize the management of patients with herpetic eye disease scheduled for cataract surgery, a questionnaire was sent to each fellow of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists registered as a consultant with a subspecialty interest in cornea. Most respondents agreed that disease stability was required before cataract surgery was offered; 62.3% would operate on patients in whom the disease had been quiescent for 3 to 6 months. The decision to prescribe prophylactic antivirals divided the respondents, with 58.8% in favor of starting antiviral treatment. Most respondents (72.46%) did not start topical antiviral treatment. In regard to changing topical steroid use postoperatively, 80.9% would not change their routine regimen. Oral acyclovir was the first line of treatment for 92.5%. The conclusions were that a significant period of inactivity should be considered before cataract surgery is performed in patients with herpes simplex virus eye disease. Oral antiviral prophylaxis is common clinical practice, but no change in routine postoperative steroid use is needed. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.
Ingo Schmack, , Daniel Epstein, Mike P. Holzer
Published: 1 January 2010
Journal of Refractive Surgery, Volume 26, pp 202-208; https://doi.org/10.3928/1081597x-20090515-05

Abstract:
To study the current practice styles and preferences of refractive surgeons in Germany. In February 2008, a seven-item questionnaire regarding the practice of refractive surgery was mailed to 282 members of the German Society of Intra-ocular Lens Implantation, Interventional, and Refractive Surgery (DGII) and the Commission of Refractive Surgery (KRC). Most questions were identical to our 2005 German refractive surgery survey. All data were analyzed in a masked fashion. The response rate was 42.2%. The majority (68%) of respondents reported that they perform refractive surgery in laser centers (exclusively or partially) followed by general hospitals (19.4%) and universities (12.6%). Although LASIK was the predominant type of refractive surgery performed (80.6%), other refractive procedures included refractive lens exchange (60.2%), photorefractive keratectomy (47.6%), phakic intraocular lens implants (45.6%), laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (36.9%), epithelial laser in situ keratomileusis (15.5%), intracorneal rings (5.8%), and limbal relaxing incisions (2.9%). The volume of refractive surgery procedures and the preferred type of excimer laser systems, microkeratomes, and diagnostic devices varied at different institutions. Most respondents performed either wavefront-guided custom ablation or wavefront-optimized ablation (63.1%) compared with conventional excimer laser correction (36.9%). Refractive surgery practice styles and preferences in Germany are comparable to trends in other European countries. Although LASIK is the most commonly performed refractive procedure, the numbers of various surface ablation techniques and refractive intraocular lens procedures are increasing.
Zelda S Pick, David V Leaming,
Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, Volume 36, pp 604-619; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9071.2008.01869.x

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, David Leaming, Benjamin Hoy
Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology, Volume 34, pp 401-410; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9071.2006.01240.x

Abstract:
This study examines the current practice and trends for cataract and refractive surgery in New Zealand. A confidential postal questionnaire was sent to all consultant ophthalmologists practising in New Zealand in 2004. Most questions were identical to the 2000 New Zealand survey, and were also similar to the 2003 survey of the American Society of Cataract and Refraction Surgeons (ASCRS). From 97 surveys there was a 92% response rate. Of those surveyed, 70 were performing cataract surgery, 17 were performing refractive surgery, subtenons anaesthetic was used for cataract surgery in 60%, clear corneal or anterior limbal incision in 86%, one-piece foldable intraocular lens in 65%. For refractive surgery, use of refractive lens surgery was recommended for high refractive errors. Advice to a 45-year-old +3.00 hypermetrope wanting refractive surgery was to have laser in situ keratomileusis (88%), laser epithelial keratomileusis (6%) or clear lens extraction (6%). Ninety-four per cent of refractive surgeons in New Zealand used a wavefront analyser. Clear lens extraction was practised by 23 ophthalmologists, phakic intraocular lenses by 16 ophthalmologists. New Zealand cataract and refractive surgery practice remains comparable to that of the members of the ASCRS. As in previous comparisons, there is a relatively low use of topical anaesthetic (New Zealand 19%vs. USA 61%vs. UK [pilot study] 33.3%). This survey showed a high uptake of wavefront analysis in refractive surgery (New Zealand 94%vs. USA 45%).
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