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(searched for: doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(15)01038-7)
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Published: 15 November 2021
by MDPI
Current Oncology, Volume 28, pp 4721-4737; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28060398

Abstract:
Background: A variety of side effects following the tattooing of the skin were reported over the years. Analytical studies showed that some tattoo inks contain harmful compounds. Methods: We presented six patient cases with cutaneous malignancies in tattooed skin and performed an extensive literature research. Results: Two patients with black ink tattoos that were diagnosed with malignant melanoma raises the number of described cases to 36 patients. One of the patients developed an immunologic reaction limited to the tattoo area after treatment with a targeted immune therapy. In the other patient, the malignancy (malignant melanoma) was fatal. Basal cell carcinoma was seen in four patients with tattoos containing varying ink colors (black, green, red). This increased the number of described patient cases to 18. Although some ink components and their cleavage products have carcinogenic properties, epidemiological evidence for a causative correlation fails. Further epidemiologic studies on tattoos and malignancies, as well as on the appearance of naevi in tattoos, are necessary. Determining the type of mutation might be helpful to separate sun-induced tumors from skin cancers due to other pathogenic mechanisms.
F. Cherkaoui El Baraka, N. Kluger, I. Ollivier, R. Bourgoin, M. Grossin, C. Zeboulon, C. Phan, C. Sin,
Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie, Volume 147, pp 285-292; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annder.2019.10.024

Abstract:
Quelques cas de mélanomes sur tatouages ont été rapportés. Le rôle du tatouage dans le développement de tumeurs cutanées malignes est cependant très discuté. Nous rapportons deux nouvelles observations de mélanomes se développant sur des tatouages, complétées d’une revue systématique de la littérature.
Stanislaw P Stawicki, Jameson M Petrochko, Andrew C Krakowski, Colin Donnelly, John B Wilson, Jennifer Bruno Irick
International Journal of Academic Medicine, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.4103/ijam.ijam_13_19

Abstract:
As tattoos become more common, it is likely that practitioners will encounter adverse tattoo reactions with increasing frequency. While some tattoo-related complications (TRCs) may be nonspecific and challenging to diagnose, others present overtly and can be identified quickly by a well-informed practitioner. TRCs occur at both of these extremes, highlighting the need for better awareness and knowledge sharing regarding this heterogeneous group of morbidities. This review is a result of a compilation of the best available clinical evidence across various groupings of TRCs. The authors' intent was to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the topic while creating a rich repository of referenced knowledge for future investigations. From the standpoint of frontline health-care providers, effective recognition and management of TRCs require an open-mind, high degree of clinical suspicion, and nonjudgmental approach to a mainstream phenomenon that is still considered by many to be a taboo. The following core competencies are addressed in this article: Medical knowledge, Patient care, and Systems-based practice.
Jose’ F Velasquez, Gisella Nele,
Journal of Surgical Case Reports, Volume 2018; https://doi.org/10.1093/jscr/rjy071

Abstract:
We report a case in which abdominal tattoo margins were modified and used to hide the surgical incision for desmoid tumour removal. Our patient is a 37-year-old female with history remarkable for atrial septal defect closure at the age of ten, but not for previous abdominal surgeries or trauma. A desmoid tumour diagnosis was made upon needle biopsy of the 5 × 4 cm2 mass confined to the rectus abdominis. Subsequently, tumour was resected with an incision through the tattoo upper margin and abdominal wall was reconstructed with primary fascial closure mesh reinforced. Excision was radical, scar inconspicuous and no incisional hernia, bulging, nor tumour recurrence were detected at 2-year follow-up. This report highlights the fact that an abdominal tattoo might be considered as incision access instead of typical midline incision.
, N. Barrado-Solís, C. Martínez-Lahuerta, E. Gimeno-Carpio
Published: 1 September 2017
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas, Volume 108, pp 678-680; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adengl.2017.06.006

, N. Barrado-Solís, C. Martínez-Lahuerta, E. Gimeno-Carpio
Published: 1 September 2017
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas, Volume 108, pp 678-680; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ad.2016.11.023

, Hristo Mangarov, Anastasiya Atanasova Chokoeva
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, Volume 5, pp 696-697; https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2017.156

Abstract:
A 40-year-old Caucasian, the otherwise healthy male patient, presented with 3-years history of a prominent tumor-like formation, located on his back, without subjective complaints. Initially, the lesion was 1-2 cm in size but gradually increased to a visible-pronounced tumor-like formation. No other dermatologic diseases, neither other known abnormalities were reported for the medical and family history. Softly-elastic on palpation tumor-like formation was established in the left infrascapular area of the back, measuring 8/9 cm in diameter. The lesion was clinically suspected for lipoma or another soft-tissue tumour with benign nature, so the patient underwent planned surgical excision under local anaesthesia. A tumour was excited with deep elliptical excision and furthered for histological evaluation, while the wound edges were sutured with single cutaneous stitches. Additionally, a large black-colored tattoo of the Bulgarian historical noble Khan Krum was also observed within the clinical examination, covering almost the whole upper 1/3 part of the patient’s back Within the careful clinical observation of the tattoo, we noticed a fibroma-like lesion, affecting the noble’s right iris. Fibromas are common benign tumours in Caucasians, composed of fibrous or connective tissue. They can be seen in all organs from mesenchymal tissue, in varies size. Eyelids are often commonly affected in elderly. Although very commonly seen in every day dermatological practice, fibromas have been never reported, located in the iris. In the presented case, a small ʺiris-fibromaʺ, hidden within a black-colored tattoo was diagnosed in a patient with lipoma, as a sporadic clinical finding.
Anastasiya Atanasova Chokoeva,
Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, Volume 5, pp 397-398; https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2017.069

Abstract:
A 28-year-old male patient, presented with a one-week history of pain and itching on the skin of the left upper leg. Erythematous indurated, warm and painful on palpation, subcutaneous plaques and nodules were clinically observed, affecting the skin of the left upper leg, within a recent black-wolf tattoo. The diagnosis of traumatic panniculitis with superposed bacterial infection, provoked by a wolf tattoo was made. The patient underwent 7-days systemic antibiotic treatment regimen and topical application of iodine povidone unguent under occlusion for 7 days. Significant alleviation of the subjective complaints was achieved within the first week, with a total clinical resolution of the symptoms. The role of the procedure as a source of trauma for subcutaneous inflammation (traumatic panniculitis) and the contamination of the equipment or the staff (infective panniculitis) in simultaneously triggering of the pathogenetic chain of the reported Wolf’s panniculitis could be present.
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