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(searched for: doi:10.18488/journal.35/2015.2.1/35.1.1.9)
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, Segun Oshewolo, Solomon I. Ifejika, John Shola Olanrewaju, Modupe Ake
Published: 1 January 2021
Cogent Social Sciences, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2021.1961396

Abstract:
This paper examines the monetization of politics through the manipulation of the loopholes in the electoral funding architecture of Nigeria. It evaluates whether the ceiling placed on individual and group donations to candidates and political parties by Nigeria’s Electoral Act 2010 (as amended) was adhered to in mobilizing election funds in recent presidential elections. In other words, this paper investigates whether election funding in Nigeria’s recent elections followed the prescribed protocols as indicated in the Electoral Act and the extent to which adherence or otherwise contributed to the monetization of the electoral contests and its implication for electoral integrity. Using data generated from key informant interviews and qualitatively analyzed in the tradition of logical inductive method, the paper finds a contravention of the legal provisions for electoral funding. The various political parties leveraged their political structures to raise funds without due recourse to the prescriptions of the Electoral Act, thus compromising the level-playing ground necessary for electoral integrity. The paper contends that the consolidation of democracy in Nigeria must entail the plugging of the capillaries and streams of illegitimate electoral funding and the establishment of critical institutional framework that would drive adherence to constitutionally prescribed provisions on electoral funding.
Published: 3 July 2020
The Round Table, Volume 109, pp 386-395; https://doi.org/10.1080/00358533.2020.1788762

Abstract:
The phenomenon of vote buying at every round of elections in Nigeria since 1999 has attracted the attention of scholars. This has given rise to a plethora of insightful analyses. In these studies, vote buying was seen mostly as a pre-voting matter. However, the 2019 elections witnessed the entrenchment of a pattern of vote buying known as ‘see and buy’, in which voters display their votes before proceeding to money collection points, often discreetly located around the voting centres. This article sees the trend as a response of the political actors to the increasing sophistication of Nigeria’s electoral administration, which made old-style election malpractices such as ballot snatching, ballot stuffing and result falsification difficult. This article adopts a qualitative method that utilises data sourced from secondary sources such as reports of local and international election observers and newspapers. It concludes that vote buying is a crooked response of the political class to electoral reforms in Nigeria.
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