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(searched for: doi:10.1177/0263774x15614730)
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The Annals of Regional Science pp 1-24; doi:10.1007/s00168-021-01050-5

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SiuSue Mark, Indra Overland, Roman Vakulchuk
Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs, Volume 39, pp 381-404; doi:10.1177/1868103420962116

Abstract:
This article studies the impact of China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) on economic actors in Myanmar. It hypothesizes that the BRI has strong transformative potential, because Chinese projects are likely to transform Myanmar’s economy on different scales and influence the allocation of economic benefits and losses for different actors. The study identifies economic actors in Myanmar who are likely to be most affected by BRI projects. It also discusses how BRI-related investments could affect the country’s complex conflict dynamics. The article concludes with policy recommendations for decision makers in Myanmar, China, and the international community for mitigating the BRI’s possible negative impacts. The analysis draws on secondary sources and primary data collection in the form of interviews with key actors in Hsipaw, Lashio, and Yangon, involved with and informed about the BRI in Myanmar at the local, regional, and national levels.
, Lloyd Scott, John P. Spillane, Katy Hayward
Construction Management and Economics, Volume 38, pp 71-90; doi:10.1080/01446193.2019.1679382

Abstract:
The United Kingdom (UK) Brexit vote of June 2016 has created unprecedented uncertainty in the construction industry in Ireland but little research to date has been undertaken on existing construction trading patterns and the potential effects of regulatory divergence and other non-tariff barriers in Ireland in this context. In response, this study uses mixed methods to fill this gap in knowledge. The experience of nine construction industry interviewees is probed – five based in Northern Ireland (in the UK) and four from Ireland, which will remain in the EU after the UK leaves. The researchers’ analysis of the qualitative data generated themes which were tested through investigation of the 101 eligible responses gathered through an online questionnaire. Our findings demonstrate that the construction trade in Ireland is highly mobile, currently trading extensively North – South and East – West. The physical barrier of the Irish Sea is less of a hindrance to trade than the regulatory barrier of the Irish border. Trade from peripheral areas is drawn to economic centres in Dublin and GB. In the view of the respondents, Brexit will impose further non-tariff barriers, although it is difficult to predict and plan for these barriers.
, Merje Kuus, Alex Jeffrey, , Nick Vaughan-Williams, Adrian Smith
Published: 1 September 2017
Political Geography, Volume 60, pp 261-271; doi:10.1016/j.polgeo.2017.02.003

Abstract:
Europe is facing challenging times. The so-called ‘migration crisis’ has seen the hardening and militarisation of Europe’s borders. Nationalist politicians are framing European states as being under siege from Islamist terrorists and economic migrants, which has led to a rise in xenophobia and casual racism on the streets of European cities. Meanwhile the Euro-zone has seen a series of employment crises and economic bailouts. Alongside such political and economic turmoil, the European Union is facing unprecedented pressures, not least from the ‘Brexit’ result of the UK's referendum on EU membership in June 2016. In reflecting on these manifold challenges to the idea and space of Europe these interventions focus on three themes that have long animated political geography scholarship: borders, power and crises. Cross-cutting the interventions are two calls to action: to rethink our analytical approaches to Europe, and to reframe our role as critical scholars
Marilena Papageorgiou
European Planning Studies, Volume 25, pp 1-16; doi:10.1080/09654313.2017.1344194

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, James D. Sidaway
Published: 1 December 2016
Geoforum, Volume 77, pp 47-50; doi:10.1016/j.geoforum.2016.10.001

Published: 8 August 2016
Europe-Asia Studies, Volume 68, pp 1197-1219; doi:10.1080/09668136.2016.1218825

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, Dimitris Kallioras,
Published: 27 July 2016
Regional Studies, Volume 51, pp 1454-1468; doi:10.1080/00343404.2016.1198472

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Vassilis Monastiriotis, Dimitris Kallioras, George C. Petrakos
Published: 1 January 2014
SSRN Electronic Journal; doi:10.2139/ssrn.2510426

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