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(searched for: doi:10.7227/ercw.4.1.2)
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Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, Volume 7, pp 113-125; https://doi.org/10.1080/20020317.2021.2002510

Abstract:
Research about race and racism(s) has helped to explain power relations and differences in education. However, it has been difficult to have a theoretical lens using the concept of race and racism(s) accepted in areas of education, as well as in educational research in Sweden. Issues formulated in terms of race and racism(s) are controversial and there is strong resistance to talk about race. This article provides an overview of research in education using the concepts of race, racism(s), and/or racialization in Sweden after World War II. The aim is to investigate educational research where these concepts come into use, how this research is framed, the findings of the studies, as well as nuances and tendencies in educational research using the concept of race. The article locates the historical view of the concept of race and its use in Sweden and argues that the history and unresolved political issues around eugenics and race come into play and contribute to the hesitation and avoidance of the use of the concept.
“Counting Black and White Beans”: Critical Race Theory in Accounting pp 129-137; https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-78973-405-820201013

Abstract:
References - Author: Anton Lewis
Racialization, Racism, and Anti-Racism in the Nordic Countries pp 3-37; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74630-2_1

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Published: 3 October 2016
Women & Therapy, Volume 40, pp 170-189; https://doi.org/10.1080/02703149.2016.1210965

Abstract:
Intercountry adoption (ICA) is the subject of polarized and contentious debates that can be expressed as “child rescue” versus “child trafficking.” This article describes the parallels between ICA and human trafficking, the international agreements that govern ICA and human trafficking, the evidence for fraud and corruption in some ICAs, and the conditions under which ICA can be considered trafficking. It concludes with recommendations for reform of ICA: addressing poverty and corruption as root causes, eliminating loopholes in international agreements, and ensuring protection for birth mothers and families.
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