Refine Search

New Search

Results: 78

(searched for: doi:10.3816/clml.2011.n.030)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 2
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Shayna Sarosiek, ,
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety pp 1-8; doi:10.1080/14740338.2021.1897565

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 24 December 2020
by Wiley
American Journal of Hematology, Volume 96, pp 258-269; doi:10.1002/ajh.26082

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kenneth J. C. Lim,
Published: 1 December 2020
Expert Review of Hematology, Volume 13, pp 1303-1310; doi:10.1080/17474086.2020.1851184

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Carmine D'acunto, , Francesca Scarpellini, Eliana Valentina Liardo, Davide Melandri
Published: 1 October 2020
JAAD Case Reports, Volume 6, pp 981-983; doi:10.1016/j.jdcr.2020.07.027

Published: 21 September 2020
Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs, Volume 25, pp 433-444; doi:10.1080/14728214.2020.1822816

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
BMC Cancer, Volume 20, pp 1-9; doi:10.1186/s12885-020-07120-9

Abstract:
The epidemiological features of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) have seldom been investigated at a national level, particularly in East Asia. The goal of our study is to present the incidence, prevalence, mortality, survival with competing risks, and causes of death of patients with WM. We used a national population-based database, operated by the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of the Korean government. This data includes information on all WM patients diagnosed according to uniform criteria, between 2003 and 2016. The total number of patients newly diagnosed with WM during the study period was 427, with a male-to-female ratio of 3.2:1. The incidence increased from 0.03 to 0.10 per 105 between 2003 and 2016, and the prevalence was 0.42 per 105 in 2016. A total of 217 patients with WM died during the study period (standardized mortality ratio = 7.57), and the overall survival (OS) of WM patients was 47.5%. On multivariate analysis, older age was associated with worse OS (P < 0.0001). WM was the most common cause of death (n = 102, 48.6%), followed by other malignant neoplasms (n = 82, 39.0%). The national incidence of WM in Korea, a racially homogeneous country in Asia, was lower than that in previous reports from other countries, reflecting ethnic disparities. However, the incidence increased, and mortality was the highest ever reported. The main cause of death was WM in itself. This study reflects the need for greater awareness of WM, particularly in Asian countries.
Kenneth J. C. Lim,
Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, Volume 21, pp 1555-1564; doi:10.1080/14656566.2020.1770727

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Iuliana Vaxman,
Published: 21 January 2020
Leukemia & Lymphoma, Volume 61, pp 1292-1304; doi:10.1080/10428194.2020.1711901

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Priyanka Samal, Prantar Chakrabarti
Indian Journal of Medical and Paediatric Oncology, Volume 41; doi:10.4103/ijmpo.ijmpo_234_19

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 5 December 2019
Blood, Volume 134, pp 2022-2035; doi:10.1182/blood.2019000725

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Pooja Advani, Aneel Paulus,
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy, Volume 12, pp 179-188; doi:10.1016/j.hemonc.2019.05.002

Abstract:
Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare, incurable hematologic disorder with a relatively indolent course in a majority of the patients. Despite this, a significant proportion of patients require treatment because of hypersecretion of immunoglobulin M and the invasion of bone marrow and peripheral organs by neoplastic lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma cells. Historically, there has been a dearth of research and therapeutic advancements in the field of WM, with most understanding based on other, related B-cell lymphoid malignancies, including multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Recently, there has been an increase in dedicated work to better explain the pathobiology of WM, which has identified several clinical and genetic markers that serve to prognosticate disease course and patient outcomes. Furthermore, this has led to dedicated clinical trials and the development of novel drugs/regimens including the first Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for this diagnosis, ibrutinib. This review aims to document some of the recent advancements with respect to prognostic markers and therapeutic options for patients with WM, as well as certain selected novel treatments with unique mechanisms of action, that are currently under development.
Withdrawal
Pooja Advani, Aneel Paulus,
Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy; doi:10.1016/j.hemonc.2019.05.001

Abstract:
Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare, incurable hematologic disorder with a relatively indolent course in a majority of the patients. Despite this, a significant proportion of patients require treatment because of hypersecretion of immunoglobulin M and the invasion of bone marrow and peripheral organs by neoplastic lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma cells. Historically, there has been a dearth of research and therapeutic advancements in the field of WM, with most understanding based on other, related B-cell lymphoid malignancies, including multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Recently, there has been an increase in dedicated work to better explain the pathobiology of WM, which has identified several clinical and genetic markers that serve to prognosticate disease course and patient outcomes. Furthermore, this has led to dedicated clinical trials and the development of novel drugs/regimens including the first Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for this diagnosis, ibrutinib. This review aims to document some of the recent advancements with respect to prognostic markers and therapeutic options for patients with WM, as well as certain selected novel treatments with unique mechanisms of action, that are currently under development.
Saurabh Zanwar, Jithma Prasad Abeykoon, Prashant Kapoor
Oncology & Hematology Review (US), Volume 15; doi:10.17925/ohr.2019.15.1.39

, Stéphanie Poulain, Lise Willems, Fatiha Merabet, Ronan Le Calloch, Jean R. Eveillard, Charles Herbaux, Damien Roos‐Weil, Iss Chaoui, Xavier Roussel, et al.
Published: 12 December 2018
by Wiley
British Journal of Haematology, Volume 186, pp 146-149; doi:10.1111/bjh.15718

Comment
Francesco Cavazzini, Gian Matteo Rigolin, Antonio Cuneo
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 379, pp 1973-1976; doi:10.1056/nejmc1809505

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 17 October 2018
by Wiley
American Journal of Hematology, Volume 94, pp 266-276; doi:10.1002/ajh.25292

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America, Volume 32, pp 841-852; doi:10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.010

, Sajitha Sachchithanantham, Shameem Mahmood, Darren Foard, Faye Sharpley, Tamer Rezk, Thirusha Lane, Cristina Quarta, , , et al.
Published: 16 August 2018
Blood, Volume 132, pp 761-764; doi:10.1182/blood-2018-04-846493

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , , , , Niels Van De Donk, , Ute Hegenbart, , Sonja Zweegman, et al.
Leukemia, Volume 32, pp 1883-1898; doi:10.1038/s41375-018-0209-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Shalal Sadullah, , , Ramón García-Sanz, , , Wolfgang Willenbacher, , Monique C Minnema, et al.
Published: 1 July 2018
The Lancet Haematology, Volume 5; doi:10.1016/s2352-3026(18)30087-5

Abstract:
Treatment options for Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia are heterogeneous, and no well established treatment standards exist. Although guidelines from the Eighth International Workshop on Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia were published in 2016, inconsistent awareness and budget constraints have prevented their widespread implementation, and real-life treatment patterns might differ across health-care systems. We aimed to generate information about treatment and outcome patterns for patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia outside of clinical trials. In this large, observational, retrospective chart review, academic and community physicians in ten European countries were invited to retrospectively complete electronic records for patients with symptomatic Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia who had begun treatment after Jan 1, 2000, and before Jan 1, 2014, and had available clinical and biological data. The primary endpoints were reasons for treatment initiation, treatment choices, progression-free survival, and overall survival. We assessed the variables that affected choice of front-line therapy, progression-free survival, and overall survival in multivariate analyses. Electronic records were reviewed for 454 eligible patients. The most frequent reasons for starting front-line treatment were anaemia (in 328 [72%] patients) and constitutional symptoms (in 264 [58%] patients). Choice of therapy varied between front-line, second-line, and third-line approaches; age; and type of institution. In the front-line setting, 193 (43%) of 454 patients received monotherapy, 164 (36%) received chemoimmunotherapy, and 95 (21%) received other combination regimens (data on front-line treatment were missing for one patient, and another patient received only steroids). After front-line treatment, median progression-free survival was 29 months (95% CI 25–31), median overall survival was not reached (not reached–not reached), and 10-year overall survival was 69% (62–74). In multivariate analyses, patients who were high risk according to the International Prognostic Scoring System for Waldenström Macroglobulinemia had significantly worse progression-free survival and overall survival than did those who were low risk. Additionally, progression-free survival was shortened in patients treated with monotherapy compared with those treated with chemoimmunotherapy or other combination therapies and in those treated at an academic institution compared with those treated in the community. Constitutional symptoms (excluding fatigue) were associated with worsened overall survival. This large observational dataset should inform and help set guidelines, and improve understanding of treatment practices and outcomes, for European patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia. Pharmacyclics LLC (an AbbVie company).
, Jithma P. Abeykoon, Amanda Shreders, , Shaji Kumar, , , Amber B. Koehler, Craig B. Reeder, Francis K. Buadi, et al.
Annals of Hematology, Volume 97, pp 1417-1425; doi:10.1007/s00277-018-3311-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Meletios A. Dimopoulos
Hematologic Malignancies pp 191-220; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-25586-6_11

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Maddalena Mazzucchelli, Anna Maria Frustaci, Marina Deodato, ,
Mediterranean Journal of Hematology and Infectious Diseases, Volume 10; doi:10.4084/mjhid.2018.004

Abstract:
Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder with distinctive clinical features.Diagnostic and prognostic charactrization in WM significantly changed with the discovery of two molecular markers: MYD88 and CXCR4. Mutational status of these latter influences both clinical presentation and prognosis and demonstrated therapeutic implications.Treatment choice in Waldemstrom disease is strictly guided by patients age and characteristics, specific goals of therapy, necessity for rapid disease control, risk of treatment-related neuropathy, disease characteristics, risk of immunosuppression or secondary malignancies and potential for future autologous stem cell transplantation.Therapeutic landscape has expanded during the last years and the approval of ibrutinib, the first drug approved for Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, represents an important step forward for a better management of the disease.
, Giampaolo Merlini, Meletios Dimopoulos
Neoplastic Diseases of the Blood pp 617-638; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-64263-5_33

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Stephen M. Ansell, Rafael Fonseca, Asher Chanan-Khan, Robert A. Kyle, Shaji K. Kumar, Joseph R. Mikhael, Thomas E. Witzig, Michelle Mauermann, Angela Dispenzieri, et al.
Published: 1 September 2017
JAMA Oncology, Volume 3, pp 1257-1265; doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.5763

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Maura Nicolosi, Elisa Santambrogio, Umberto Vitolo
Expert Review of Hematology, Volume 10, pp 637-647; doi:10.1080/17474086.2017.1339596

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Robert Frank Cornell, Linda J. Burns
Hematopoietic Cell Transplants pp 384-391; doi:10.1017/9781316335727.041

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Ariel C. Johnson, , Stacy J. Arnold, Ali McBride, Ling Zhang, Rachid C. Baz,
Clinical Lymphoma Myeloma and Leukemia, Volume 17, pp 252-262; doi:10.1016/j.clml.2017.02.028

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Antonio Sacco, Adriano Fenotti, Loredana Affò, Stefano Bazzana, Domenico Russo, Marco Presta, Michele Malagola, Antonella Anastasia, Marina Motta, Christopher J. Patterson, et al.
Published: 11 March 2017
Oncotarget, Volume 8, pp 35435-35444; doi:10.18632/oncotarget.16130

Abstract:
The Literature has recently reported on the importance of genomics in the field of hematologic malignancies, including B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders such as Waldenström's Macrolgobulinemia (WM). Particularly, whole exome sequencing has led to the identification of the MYD88L265P and CXCR4C1013G somatic variants in WM, occurring in about 90% and 30% of the patients, respectively. Subsequently, functional studies have demonstrated their functional role in supporting WM pathogenesis and disease progression, both in vitro and in vivo, thus providing the pre-clinical evidences for extremely attractive targets for novel therapeutic interventions in WM. Of note, recent evidences have also approached and defined the transcriptome profiling of WM cells, revealing a signature that mirrors the somatic aberrations demonstrated within the tumor clone. A parallel research field has also reported on microRNAs (miRNAs), highlighting the oncogenic role of miRNA-155 in WM. In the present review, we focus on the latest reports on genomics and miRNAs in WM, providing an overview of the clinical relevance of the latest acquired knowledge about genomics and miRNA aberrations in WM.
Jithma P Abeykoon, ,
Cancer Management and Research, pp 73-83; doi:10.2147/CMAR.S94059

Abstract:
New developments in the management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia Jithma P Abeykoon,1 Uday Yanamandra,2 Prashant Kapoor1,3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Hematology and Stem Cell Transplant, Army Hospital (Research & Referral), Delhi, India; 3Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare, immunoglobulin M -associated lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. With the recent discoveries of CXCR warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis (WHIM) and MYD88 mutations, our understanding of the biology of WM has expanded substantially. While WM still remains incurable, the field is rapidly evolving, and a number of promising agents with significant activity in this malignancy are being evaluated currently. In this review, we discuss the new developments that have occurred in WM over the past 15 years, with a focus on the role of ibrutinib, an oral Brutonâ
, , , Jeffrey V Matous, David Macdonald, , Olivier Tournilhac, Shuo Ma, , Leonard T Heffner, et al.
Published: 1 February 2017
The Lancet Oncology, Volume 18, pp 241-250; doi:10.1016/s1470-2045(16)30632-5

Abstract:
In the era of widespread rituximab use for Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia, new treatment options for patients with rituximab-refractory disease are an important clinical need. Ibrutinib has induced durable responses in previously treated patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia. We assessed the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib in a population with rituximab-refractory disease. This multicentre, open-label substudy was done at 19 sites in seven countries in adults aged 18 years and older with confirmed Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia, refractory to rituximab and requiring treatment. Disease refractory to the last rituximab-containing therapy was defined as either relapse less than 12 months since last dose of rituximab or failure to achieve at least a minor response. Key exclusion criteria included: CNS involvement, a stroke or intracranial haemorrhage less than 12 months before enrolment, clinically significant cardiovascular disease, hepatitis B or hepatitis C viral infection, and a known bleeding disorder. Patients received oral ibrutinib 420 mg once daily until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The substudy was not prospectively powered for statistical comparisons, and as such, all the analyses are descriptive in nature. This study objectives were the proportion of patients with an overall response, progression-free survival, overall survival, haematological improvement measured by haemoglobin, time to next treatment, and patient-reported outcomes according to the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) and the Euro Qol 5 Dimension Questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L). All analyses were per protocol. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02165397, and follow-up is ongoing but enrolment is complete. Between Aug 18, 2014, and Feb 18, 2015, 31 patients were enrolled. Median age was 67 years (IQR 58–74); 13 (42%) of 31 patients had high-risk disease per the International Prognostic Scoring System Waldenström Macroglobulinaemia, median number of previous therapies was four (IQR 2–6), and all were rituximab-refractory. At a median follow-up of 18·1 months (IQR 17·5–18·9), the proportion of patients with an overall response was 28 [90%] of 31 (22 [71%] of patients had a major response), the estimated 18 month progression-free survival rate was 86% (95% CI 66–94), and the estimated 18 month overall survival rate was 97% (95% CI 79–100). Baseline median haemoglobin of 10·3 g/dL (IQR 9·3–11·7) increased to 11·4 g/dL (10·9–12·4) after 4 weeks of ibrutinib treatment and reached 12·7 g/dL (11·8–13·4) at week 49. A clinically meaningful improvement from baseline in FACT-An score, anaemia subscale score, and the EQ-5D-5L were reported at all post-baseline visits. Time to next treatment will be presented at a later date. Common grade 3 or worse adverse events included neutropenia in four patients (13%), hypertension in three patients (10%), and anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and diarrhoea in two patients each (6%). Serious adverse events occurred in ten patients (32%) and were most often infections. Five (16%) patients discontinued ibrutinib: three due to progression and two due to adverse events, while the remaining 26 [84%] of patients are continuing ibrutinib at the time of this report. The sustained responses and median progression-free survival time, combined with a manageable toxicity profile observed with single-agent ibrutinib indicate that this chemotherapy-free approach is a potential new treatment choice for patients who had heavily pretreated, rituximab-refractory Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia. Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie Company.
Morie A. Gertz
Published: 17 January 2017
by Wiley
American Journal of Hematology, Volume 92, pp 209-217; doi:10.1002/ajh.24557

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, Volume 26, pp 197-205; doi:10.1080/13543784.2017.1275561

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Anna Maria Frustaci, Paola Picardi, Antonino Greco, Alessandra Tedeschi
Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia pp 357-365; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-22584-5_25

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Laetitia Souchet, Sylvain Choquet, Christian Buske
Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia pp 315-326; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-22584-5_21

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Biology and Management of Unusual Plasma Cell Dyscrasias pp 71-93; doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-6848-7_4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Efstathios Kastritis, Ranjana Advani, , Christian Buske, , Ramón García-Sanz, , , Charalampia Kyriakou, et al.
Published: 8 September 2016
Blood, Volume 128, pp 1321-1328; doi:10.1182/blood-2016-04-711234

Abstract:
Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder for which clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and treatment strategy have been proposed as part of the consensus panels of the International Workshop on Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia (IWWM). At IWWM-8, a task force for treatment recommendations was impanelled to review recently published and ongoing clinical trial data as well as the impact of new mutations (MYD88 and CXCR4) on treatment decisions, indications for B-cell receptor and proteasome inhibitors, and future clinical trial initiatives for WM patients. The panel concluded that therapeutic strategies in WM should be based on individual patient and disease characteristics. Chemoimmunotherapy combinations with rituximab and cyclophosphamide-dexamethasone, bendamustine, or bortezomib-dexamethasone provide durable responses and are still indicated in most patients. Approval of the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib in the United States and Europe represents a novel and effective treatment option for both treatment-naive and relapsing patients. Other B-cell receptor inhibitors, second-generation proteasome inhibitors (eg, carfilzomib), and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are promising and may increase future treatment options. Active enrollment in clinical trials whenever possible was endorsed by the panel for most patients with WM.
Efstathios Kastritis,
Best Practice & Research Clinical Haematology, Volume 29, pp 194-205; doi:10.1016/j.beha.2016.08.023

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Vincent Levy, Maya Ouzegdouh, Jérôme Tamburini, , , , Brigitte Pégourié-Bandelier, Olivier Tournilhac, Marouanne Boubaya, et al.
Published: 2 May 2016
by Wiley
American Journal of Hematology, Volume 91, pp 782-786; doi:10.1002/ajh.24405

Abstract:
Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia is generally treated with alkylating agents, purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies, alone or in combination. We report the outcomes of 82 patients (median age 61 years) treated with the RFC combination. Twenty‐five patients were treatment‐naive. RFC was administered every 4 weeks, for a median of five cycles. At treatment discontinuation, the overall response rate was 85.4%. The responses improved after treatment discontinuation in 25 patients, with a median time to best response achievement of 10.8 months, raising the major response rate (PR, VGPR and CR) from 64.6% to 76.8%. With a median follow‐up of 47 months, the median progression‐free survival time had not been reached (67% PFS at 48 months) and was influenced by age and treatment status before RFC. Likewise, the median time to next therapy had not been reached. Two cases of myelodysplastic syndrome/AML and 3 cases of transformation to aggressive lymphoma occurred. Thirteen patients died. The 3‐year overall survival rate was 90%. Long‐lasting cytopenias occurred in 19 patients. The RFC combination thus gave a high response rate and durable responses, even in heavily treatment‐experienced patients. The high incidence of long‐lasting cytopenia might be reduced by giving fewer courses and thereby minimizing myelotoxicity. Am. J. Hematol. 91:782–786, 2016.
, Efstathios Kastritis, Irene M Ghobrial
Published: 23 November 2015
Annals of Oncology, Volume 27, pp 233-240; doi:10.1093/annonc/mdv572

Abstract:
Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare, low-grade malignancy with no established standard of care. Rituximab regimens are most commonly used, supported by their efficacy in hematologic malignancies, including WM. A growing number of investigational regimens for WM have been evaluated in phase II clinical trials, including single-agent and combination strategies that include newer-generation monoclonal antibodies (ofatumumab and alemtuzumab), proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib), immunomodulatory agents (thalidomide and lenalidomide), phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway inhibitors (everolimus and perifosene), a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ibrutinib), and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (panobinostat). Other novel agents are in early-stage development for WM. International treatment guidelines for WM suggest suitable regimens in the newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory settings, in accordance with patient age, disease presentation, and efficacy and safety profiles of particular drugs. These factors must be considered when choosing appropriate therapy for individual patients with WM, to maximize response and prolong survival, while minimizing the risk of adverse events. This review article provides a clinical perspective of the modern management of patients with WM, in the context of available trial data for novel regimens and recently updated treatment guidelines.
渊朱 华, 徐 卫, 勇李 建, Huayuan Zhu, Wei Xu,
Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi, Volume 36, pp 972-976; doi:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-2727.2015.11.019

Guillemette Fouquet, Stéphanie Guidez, Marie-Odile Petillon, Chanaz Louni, Bella Ohyba, Malek Dib, , Charles Herbaux, Audrey Martin, Béatrice Thielemans, et al.
Published: 6 October 2015
by Wiley
American Journal of Hematology, Volume 90, pp 1055-1059; doi:10.1002/ajh.24175

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 September 2015
Blood Reviews, Volume 29, pp 301-319; doi:10.1016/j.blre.2015.03.001

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rajshekhar Chakraborty, Prashant Kapoor, , Morie A Gertz
Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, Volume 15, pp 1143-1156; doi:10.1586/14737140.2015.1071668

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rajshekhar Chakraborty, Prashant Kapoor, ,
Expert Review of Hematology, Volume 8, pp 569-579; doi:10.1586/17474086.2015.1061427

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Silvia Montoto, Charalampia Kyriakou
Clinical Guide to Transplantation in Lymphoma pp 241-246; doi:10.1002/9781118863282.ch24

Comment
Christian Buske, J. F. Seymour
Published: 12 May 2015
Leukemia & Lymphoma, Volume 56, pp 2489-2490; doi:10.3109/10428194.2015.1058938

Page of 2
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top